100d limit

Loris

Mongoose
Hy All, i'm a total newbe of traveller, even if i own 10 different reiteration of the game i haven't never ever played or mastered a game.
Now i'm trying to convince a group of friends to start playing.
One thing that i can't untertstand fully is the 100d limit...
There is somewhere a table of the travel times to reach the 100d limit, maybe based on the UPP of the system?
or has anyone a fast rule to generate it? (maybe a x*y dices of hoursor something similar)
thank You!
 

MasterGwydion

Banded Mongoose
I wrote an excel spreadsheet based on the formulas in the books. It breaks everything down by thrust and distance. All Thrusts and Planetary Sizes for time to and from the 100D limit. I have the Thrust and Range Band chart for missile travel times in the same spreadsheet. It will also allow you to manually calculate the travel times between variable distance planetary orbits.

Unfortunately, I have no idea how to give it to you in the forum.
 

kevinknight

Banded Mongoose
I have created a spreadsheet in OpenOffice, but you can download and pull it into Excel. It has a bunch of standard distances then the bottom line allows you to enter your distance desired and returns the time.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/4rzgagjtglelthd/TravGen%20Travel%20Times.ods?dl=0
 

paltrysum

Cosmic Mongoose
You can estimate using the table on p. 163 of the 2022 Core Rulebook. For example, if the planet is size 8 (approximately 12,800km in diameter), then 100 times that is 1.28 million km. Looking at the table, it takes about 333 minutes at 1G of acceleration to travel 1 million km, so you could fudge it to require about 425 minutes. No, that is not accurate, but if you're looking for a quick and dirty answer, that will do.

For a more accurate answer, the formulas described here will help: http://forum.mongoosepublishing.com/viewtopic.php?t=56360
 

MasterGwydion

Banded Mongoose
paltrysum said:
You can estimate using the table on p. 163 of the 2022 Core Rulebook. For example, if the planet is size 8 (approximately 12,800km in diameter), then 100 times that is 1.28 million km. Looking at the table, it takes about 333 minutes at 1G of acceleration to travel 1 million km, so you could fudge it to require about 425 minutes. No, that is not accurate, but if you're looking for a quick and dirty answer, that will do.

For a more accurate answer, the formulas described here will help: http://forum.mongoosepublishing.com/viewtopic.php?t=56360

6 hours 18 minutes by My count. for 100d on a Size 8 planet with a Thrust 1
4 hours 27 minutes for Thrust 2
3 hours 38 minutes for Thrust 3
3 hours 9 minutes for Thrust 4
2 hours 49 minutes for Thrust 5
2 hours 34 minutes for Thrust 6
2 hours 23 minutes for Thrust 7
2 hours 14 minutes for Thrust 8
2 hours 6 minutes for Thrust 9

All of these numbers include start from and end at zero velocity relative to the planet.
 

adzling

Banded Mongoose
this is the google sheet i built to track intra and inter-system spacecraft chases.

If you want hit me up and i will post.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/kjb6aifbrwqiv88/Screen%20Shot%202022-05-26%20at%201.44.00%20PM.png?dl=0
 

IanBruntlett

Cosmic Mongoose
Loris said:
Hy All, i'm a total newbe of traveller, even if i own 10 different reiteration of the game i haven't never ever played or mastered a game.
Now i'm trying to convince a group of friends to start playing.
One thing that i can't untertstand fully is the 100d limit...
There is somewhere a table of the travel times to reach the 100d limit, maybe based on the UPP of the system?
or has anyone a fast rule to generate it? (maybe a x*y dices of hoursor something similar)
thank You!

I am using the Traveller Core Rule Book (2016 edition).

On p148, the rules state "A ship can only safely jump when it is more than 100 diameters distant from any object larger than the ship".

I used the formulae on p152 of the in a spreadsheet, to come up with timings to reach the 100 diameter limit, mainly for world sizes 1 to 10 (aka A).

The formula is:
Time = 2 x Square Root of ( Distance / Acceleration)

Where:-
Time is in seconds
Distance is in metres
Acceleration is in 'G' i.e. Thrust setting for the manoeuvre drive.
EDIT Acceleration is in G and a Thrust of 1 is 10m/s/s etc so when you do the calculation it should be:
Time = 2 x Square Root of ( Distance / (Thrust*10))
As an approximation, G is assumed to be 10m/s/s instead of the usual 9.8m/s/s
I am working on a Python script to produce a better quick reference table.

My calculations can be accessed as a PDF https://drive.google.com/file/d/1wMAV01dOpty13l0UwKnpu0lZ-jYdu8B_/view?usp=sharing or as a .ods file https://drive.google.com/file/d/14WidI7DZGZoQ3fhaldAIo84EKBdn8_Si/view?usp=sharing

Note: I calculate time taken in seconds because of my (limited) spreadsheet abilities, the figures for "Minutes" and "Hours" might not be what you expect. The columns for minutes and hours are probably best regarded as "ball park" figures with the number after the decimal point ignored.
 

IanBruntlett

Cosmic Mongoose
I wanted to know how long it would take to travel to the 100 diameters limit, starting off from a world.

So I wrote a small Python program to create a quick reference table.

I then used that quick reference table to create a convenient to use (I hope!) table.

Because I can't post a PDF here, I decided to make it available on Google Drive..

If you are interested, take a peek at it here... https://drive.google.com/file/d/1pq9tN7vk2GCo4jhU9bxI0nDIGhjFVx7K/view?usp=sharing

Let me know if you can access it OK or not.
 
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