[OGL Ancients] Follow-up material

The King

Cosmic Mongoose
Are there any chance to see some complementary material and/or scenarios/campaigns for OGL ancients like it was the case for Slaine RPG?
 

Stratos

Mongoose
There's some stuff in the Signs & Portents magazine (Mongoose Publishing's in-house monthly magazine). You should be able to find it a FLGS or subscribe. Every month is chock full o great stuff (including more Slaine too!).

As for supplemental books... the way the Mongoose OGL works... they put out the core rules and are relying on other publishers to put out supplemental books. I know Kiln Publications is working on several supplements for a few of the OGL books. Check them out: www.kilnpublications.com

Cheers!
 

The King

Cosmic Mongoose
mthomason said:
The King said:
What about a good 256-pages good Greek campaign?

Might be willing to publish one if anyone's willing to write one.... :)
I ordered the core book recently. I love the setting but have some dislike of the d20 system. However I read much interesting reviews at Enworld and I let me persuade to give it a try.
I could very well write something inspired from Jason and the Argonauts or even the Odysseus.

kiln publications said:
are you talking from 1st level up to a certain level???
Exactly. A campaign like slain for example. We do'nt need to play the Greek heroes already. First of all, the PC's must build their own legends among monsters, foes and friends alike and gods of course.
 
The King said:
mthomason said:
The King said:
What about a good 256-pages good Greek campaign?

Might be willing to publish one if anyone's willing to write one.... :)
I ordered the core book recently. I love the setting but have some dislike of the d20 system. However I read much interesting reviews at Enworld and I let me persuade to give it a try.
I could very well write something inspired from Jason and the Argonauts or even the Odysseus.

I'd buy it!
:D
 

The King

Cosmic Mongoose
Confused Wolf said:
The King said:
mthomason said:
Might be willing to publish one if anyone's willing to write one.... :)
I ordered the core book recently. I love the setting but have some dislike of the d20 system. However I read much interesting reviews at Enworld and I let me persuade to give it a try.
I could very well write something inspired from Jason and the Argonauts or even the Odysseus.

I'd buy it!
:D
I am pleased to have my first client before my even working on it. :D
 
I had a question, would a mythical campaign set in ancient Greece that did not include historical facts be too far off? As in using the geography, basic gods and goddesses and going on from there. The reason I am asking is people bring up historical basis for playing the game but I wasn't sure how a "fictional" scenario would go over.
 

The King

Cosmic Mongoose
kiln publications said:
I had a question, would a mythical campaign set in ancient Greece that did not include historical facts be too far off? As in using the geography, basic gods and goddesses and going on from there. The reason I am asking is people bring up historical basis for playing the game but I wasn't sure how a "fictional" scenario would go over.
You do what you want with your campaign. Nobody can tell you it's right or wrong. It's your world with mythic/historical setting.
All the older D&D and ADD setting used historical background and inserted their own mythology. You should do the same.
For my part I intend to developp a campaign in mythic Greece without the need to base on historical facts. Myths are tales by definition, not facts.
Of course one can always talk of the myth of Alexander the great but what he did is recorded as historical facts. If you read books about him you will learn about the legends surrounding him but the guy lived in the historical period of Greece where all men and women were mortals.
That is why you can developp your own mythos if you play a campaign before the recorded history (i.e. the tales of the Odysseus and the Iliad and the other common tales from gods and demigods of that time).
 

The King

Cosmic Mongoose
When I think of it, the OGL ancients core book really need some companion sourcebooks. Look at Conan RPG for example: the rulebook has more than 350 pages whereas OGL ancients only counts 256 pages.
Hey for a 128 pages sourcebooks we could have some data on navigation (including the famous People from the Sea), siege rules, the city-states or the Egyptian gouvernment, etc.
 
I had a question, would a mythical campaign set in ancient Greece that did not include historical facts be too far off? As in using the geography, basic gods and goddesses and going on from there. The reason I am asking is people bring up historical basis for playing the game but I wasn't sure how a "fictional" scenario would go over.

A mythical campaign certainly doesn't have to stick to the historical facts. It would be more important to keep the "feel" of the Greek myths, but of course it is difficult to define what that exactly does mean...
 
I guess what I should clarify would be starting the "heroes" at 1st level..have them develop up through the levels until they end up possibly being gods and goddesses or rulers themselves. Maybe have them interact with some people out of mythology such as Icarus, the Minotaur, etc.... that way there is hopefully no one saying but in "fill in the black year" such and such did not do that historically...... maybe even do one for Egypt. Write now I am doing prelim work for an entry level adventure called "Tears of the Oracle". I would like to maybe run it one of the days at Origins as a pick up game.....
 

The King

Cosmic Mongoose
You can refer to the Hercules & Xena series where anachronisms are many. You can't be ahistorical with mythology. The life of Icarus was never written so I guess he probably had the time to meet your player's characters.
The same is true with Jason and the Argonauts. The film tells a version but you can invent your own.
Look at the movie Odysseus with Kirk Douglas. There are many facts of the myths that weren't included in the movie. Can we thus say the movie isn't historical?
Even better: the movie Hercules (with Steve Reeves) does only feature a part of his life but doesn't relate all of his 12 labors.
In conclusion you have an open choice in doing what you want. If you want more info, you might appreciate the "Greek Myths" by Robert Graves.
 
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