Space 1999

Tom Kalbfus

Mongoose
I recently saw the pilot episode of Space 1999

Here is the summary from the wikipedia entry:

The date is 9 September 1999. An Eagle transporter has landed at Nuclear Disposal Area Two on the far side of the Moon. The isolated site is a vast repository for atomic waste shipped from Earth. Automated handling equipment unloads numerous lead drums from the craft, lowering them into one of the many storage shafts dug into the lunar surface. During this operation, two space-suited technicians enter the restricted area. The men begin a methodical survey of the radiation-proof synthocrete covers sealing the shafts, searching for the slightest indication of radiation leakage.

The operation is under the supervision of Professor Victor Bergman and Doctor Helena Russell, whose attention is focused more on the 'scopes recording the men's vital signs than the radiation detectors. As they watch, the brain-wave patterns of one man, Jim Nordstrom, go haywire. After suffering an apparent seizure, the man goes berserk. He attacks his co-worker then runs into the laser barrier which surrounds the restricted area. Nordstrom is repelled and falls, smashing his helmet open on a rock. One unnaturally opaque green eye stares sightlessly through the splintered visor as he dies from explosive decompression.

During this, Eagle Two is seen en route to the Moon. Its sole passenger is John Koenig, the newly appointed commander of Moonbase Alpha, a self-sustaining lunar colony built by the nations of Earth as a centre for space research and exploration. Gerald Simmonds, chief executive of the World Space Commission, calls to impress upon Koenig that nothing must delay his first assignment: the launch of the manned deep-space probe to the planet Meta. A virus infection plaguing the Meta Probe astronauts and other operatives on the Moon must not be an obstacle.

After Simmonds signs off, Koenig's ship passes the Space Dock, a space station in lunar orbit; as he watches, the Meta probe ship docks with the station. Meta is a rogue planet currently passing through the outer limits of Earth's solar system. The planet was discovered when radio astronomers were tracking a series of repetitive radio signals approaching from deep space. Photographs sent back from the latest robot probe, Spacefarer 9, confirm that Meta possesses an atmosphere. Hopes are high that the upcoming mission will find Meta supporting some form of intelligent life.

Eagle Two touches down and Koenig is met at the travel-tube station by Bergman, an old friend and university mentor. The professor informs Koenig that, in addition to a news blackout, all routine travel has been suspended due to the medical crisis. After the two men reach Koenig's office, Bergman reveals a closely guarded secret—the 'virus infection' is a cover-story. No one knows what has killed nine workers at Disposal Area Two and affected Probe Astronauts Eric Sparkman and Frank Warren. Bergman suggests Koenig meet with Helena Russell, head of the Medical Section. He is intrigued when the professor reveals the previous commander had suppressed her findings.

The next morning, Koenig meets with Helena in her office. As both try to ignore the obvious attraction between them, Helena delivers her report. The symptoms of the affected men are consistent with radiation-induced cerebral cancer—a malignant brain tumour causing first disorientation and aberrant behaviour, then coma and death. However, there has been no sign of radiation exposure detected in any of the victims. There is also no connection between the disposal-area workers and the Meta Probe crew. Visiting the astronauts, Koenig is shocked by what he finds in Intensive Care: two unresponsive vegetables, staring sightlessly with milky green eyes.

Knowing that the Meta Probe astronauts will never recover, Koenig confers with Captain Alan Carter, head of Reconnaissance, about the feasibility of continuing the mission with the back-up crew. The Australian astronaut (knowing only the 'virus infection' cover-story) responds negatively, but promises that his staff will expedite preparations for the launch. Helena, though, will not vouch for the continued health of the back-up crew, as their working and living conditions have been identical to the affected astronauts.

Simmonds calls and is briefed on the current situation. Koenig is unsettled by the Commissioner's lack of concern over the deaths and his insistence on maintaining appearances for the sake of political manoeuvring (especially as the International Lunar Finance Committee meets on the fifteenth to discuss the budget for the coming year). He makes a deal with Simmonds that will temporarily suspend atomic-waste shipments from Earth, giving him time to investigate the cause of the silent killer on the Moon. In return, Koenig guarantees the Meta Probe will be launched.

Koenig and Bergman fly to Area Two to oversee another radiation check. Their Eagle first approaches Disposal Area One, where operations ceased five years previously. When questioned, the pilot, Collins, informs Koenig that Area One is a turning point for travel to Area Two—being one of the few constructs on the Moon's far side, it is known as Navigation Beacon Delta. Bergman informs Koenig there is no indication of any radiation leak at this site. As they proceed on, the viewer sees Collins display a facial tic then begin to repeatedly rub his right eye.

At Area Two, Koenig and Bergman observe the two technician-volunteers scan the waste-pit covers for the slightest hint of radioactive emission. Proceeding without incident, the survey results in another negative reading. Suddenly, a psychotic Collins—his right eye now opaque green—raves he must get out. He rushes at the monitoring depot's windows and attempts to bash one out with his space helmet. In the ensuing scuffle, Koenig manages to stun the astronaut. The group escapes from the compartment just before the fractured window ruptures.

Returning to Moonbase, Koenig discovers Warren has expired. Soon after, Helena pronounces Sparkman dead, shutting off his life-support system. Revealing the true nature of the 'virus infection' to Carter, Koenig suspends the Meta Probe launch until the cause of death is discovered. The Commander then spends a sleepless Alpha 'night' listening to the Meta signals. As he broods over the events of the past few days, he thinks to himself that what Neil Armstrong declared to be a 'giant leap for mankind' in 1969 has proven to be more of a stumble in the dark.

Electronic detective work by Benjamin Ouma, head of the Computer Section, reveals the correlating factor between the Meta Probe astronauts, the pilot Collins, and the disposal area workers who developed the illness: they have all flown over Navigation Beacon Delta—the obsolete Disposal Area One—on numerous occasions. An examination of the probe astronauts' training flights reveals times where some influence blanked out the flight recorder over that location. A check is made on Area One and senior data analyst Sandra Benes reports rising heat levels. Remote cameras show the concrete mounds glowing redly. Despite the heat, there is no detectable radioactivity.

After the cameras burn out, Koenig flies out to Area One himself to observe the situation. The mounds are now emitting strange flares of energy. While over the site, his Eagle's flight controls suddenly fail and he manages a crash-landing some distance away. Moments later, Area One is consumed by a series of explosions. The Commander, retrieved by the search-and-rescue team, is brought back to Alpha for medical assessment. After he is given a clean bill of health, a concerned Helena berates him for his recklessness. Amused, Koenig retorts, 'I didn't know you cared.'

Investigating the explosion, Bergman finds an instrument salvaged from the site that recorded a sharp increase in magnetic activity. Further research reveals a never-before-seen reaction from the accumulated atomic waste—powerful emissions of magnetic radiation. These wild surges of energy are responsible for the sudden brain damage and the flight-instrument failures; as seen at Area One, the unstable waste material eventually explodes. Unwilling to risk more lives, Koenig and Helena declare Area Two off limits. To obtain further data, a remote-controlled Eagle is flown over the site. Soon after arriving, a magnetic surge fries the ship's control systems and it crashes.

To force a face-to-face confrontation with Simmonds, Koenig transmits an emergency code—then is ‘unavailable’ for the follow-up inquiries. On 13 September 1999, the Commissioner travels to Alpha. Unwilling to acknowledge the danger, he questions whether Area Two is an actual threat. Heat levels there are rising and, as Bergman points out, it contains over one hundred forty times the amount of atomic waste buried at Area One. Simmonds wonders if, like Area One, it could simply burn out in a sub-surface firestorm. Koenig insists there can be no hope of a controlled reaction—they are sitting atop the biggest bomb ever made by Man.

Simmonds seizes on Bergman's suggestion to disperse the waste over the Moon's surface; by breaking up the accumulated mass, they might reduce the potential of a nuclear explosion. Eagles fitted with electromagnetic winches proceed to Area Two. They begin the slow process of emptying the forty-eight silos one canister at a time. The heat level holds, but there are disturbing indications of magnetic-field fluctuations. With all the Eagles committed to the operation (and two already forced to return to base with guidance-system damage from the magnetic-field effect), Koenig has Carter commandeer Simmonds' Eagle for a high-altitude observatory flight.

Simmonds confidently declares the situation to be under control, suggesting they draft a communiqué to the Space Commission to dispel any doubts. An exasperated Koenig tries to give the politician a reality check when the magnetic field surges off the scale. Energy discharges shoot from the open waste pits. An ever-growing chain reaction of explosions obliterates Area Two and spreads to the waste canisters strewn over the lunar surface. Only those Eagles not over the site escape destruction. In mere seconds, the entire area erupts in a colossal fireball that rocks the entire Moon.

At Alpha, seismic shocks fracture the crater floor, rupturing several buildings of the installation. All personnel are hurled to the floor, pinned down by tremendous g-forces—the force of the explosion is rapidly pushing the Moon out of orbit. In space, the Moon's violent motion sends the orbiting Space Dock tumbling out of control; the Meta probe ship is flung away into space as the station blows apart under the strain. Carter fights to keep his Eagle under control and in range, radioing Alpha with a running commentary as the Moon accelerates away from Earth, propelled by the rocket-like thrust of the nuclear blast.

Koenig drags himself to the communications desk; with great effort, he reaches up and opens a channel to Carter. The astronaut reports Eagle One was caught in the Moon's gravitational field and has been carried along with it. He will make it back to base. As the waste pile stops fissioning, acceleration drops and the overpowering g-forces abate. Adjustments made to the base's artificial-gravity field help compensate. Alpha has sustained damage, but is operational. As the senior executives try to figure their next move, a live visual from the Mars satellite documents the Moon's rapid plunge out of the solar system.

Koenig orders Central Computer to assess the chance of successfully executing Operation Exodus, the emergency evacuation plan. With the Moon moving on an unknown trajectory and experiencing constantly shifting g-forces, current conditions match no recorded parameters. Computer concludes human decision is required. Koenig then informs the population of Alpha of their present situation. Under current conditions, he assures them, there is the possibility of a continued existence in space. They are alive, the base is intact and has sustained power and environment. As any attempt to return to Earth would fail, he concludes, they will not try.

Second-in-command Paul Morrow scans all frequencies for any signal from Earth, intercepting an American television newscast. The newsreader reports on the calamitous affects the Moon's departure has had on Earth—tidal waves and major earthquakes along established fault lines in the United States, Yugoslavia and southern France. Regarding those stationed on Moonbase Alpha, the loss of the Space Dock ended any attempt to improvise a rescue attempt. As the signal fades, the newsreader comments little hope is held that any of Alpha's 311 personnel survived the catastrophe.

With this last contact with Earth gone, the Main Mission staff despondently listens to the hiss of static. Their hopes are lifted as the mysterious electromagnetic noise from Meta fades in over the speakers. As the Meta signals increase in strength, Koenig speculates aloud that Meta may be where their future lies...

So if we were to convert this to a non standard Traveller campaign, how would we have to change this story to apply Traveller rules to it? Would anyone want to make an attempt? I can see some problems with this story of course. Applying established Traveller technologies, how would you fix it, or at least make it seem more plausible within the context of Traveller rules?

I think the timeline between 1972 and 1999 would have to be radically different from what actually occured. First thing, we need to justify a rapid increase in the tech level from Tech Level 7 to late 8, at some point artificial gravity is invented. Probably the Eagles have a standard Traveller Maneuver Drive. Somehow the nuclear accident has to cast an inertia dampening field rather than being a simple explosion. I think the rogue planet Meta might have something to do with it, as far as I know, Meta is not investigated, maybe the reason it is rogue has something to do with why the Moon is hurled out of its orbit. Would anyone care to use their imagination and square this circle?
 

Tom Kalbfus

Mongoose
GypsyComet said:
Or you push the date to 2049.
There is so much rubber here, it doesn't really matter. My thoughts are the the rogue planet Meta is the Moon from the future, sent to the past. Meta exchanges momentum with the Moon and replaces it in its orbit.
 

Reynard

Cosmic Mongoose
I really took the show with a moon sized grain of salt even at 21 years old when it first aired. The concept of a base on the moon like the show portrayed seemed more than reasonable. We assumed they were used to moon gravity and went on. The idea of an explosion big enough to push the moon at FTL speed... we watched it without worrying. I think the fans focused on the stories rather than the mode of travel.

For Traveller, I can't even begin to make moon ship concept work. Everything else would be no problem. The technology level we see on the show is at least 8 or 9 and, by 70s standards, would seem very possible. Treat it as all the right breaks except no jump tech. The two important tech are gravity control and advance maneuver drives. I think they had energy weapons, right?

Rather than the moon and avoiding the small focus as with Lost in Space (one family), think about Arthur C. Clark's Rama series involving titanic starships passing through our solar system. For this scenario, it could be 'unmanned' and on autopilot roaming the cosmos. Teams arrive them find themselves trapped on a journey of exploration on a world ship.
 

Reynard

Cosmic Mongoose
Went through my library and found my 1977 Alpha Moonbase Technical manual plus an insert from an issue of Starlog magazine featuring the Eagles including the blueprint. Now I'll see what iconic features we can Travellerize.

Just for a taste, Moonbase is 4 km in diameter and extends to 1 km under the surface. No mention to the explosion but I made a note in the manual. I must have found the info somewhere else. "The explosion that occurs on the moon is in the form of ultra intense magnetic radiation in a field form. The effects give an incredible thrust to move the moon into hyper speeds while also acting as a gravitational bottle greatly minimizing the acceleration effect. As the thrust decreased, the reactional bottle followed. The bottle effect also pulled Allen Carter's ship along."
 

dragoner

Mongoose
The eagle's analog can be a 50ton cutter, and Alpha only about 300 people, so a small cruiser would work.
 

Tom Kalbfus

Mongoose
Reynard said:
I really took the show with a moon sized grain of salt even at 21 years old when it first aired. The concept of a base on the moon like the show portrayed seemed more than reasonable. We assumed they were used to moon gravity and went on. The idea of an explosion big enough to push the moon at FTL speed... we watched it without worrying. I think the fans focused on the stories rather than the mode of travel.

For Traveller, I can't even begin to make moon ship concept work. Everything else would be no problem. The technology level we see on the show is at least 8 or 9 and, by 70s standards, would seem very possible. Treat it as all the right breaks except no jump tech. The two important tech are gravity control and advance maneuver drives. I think they had energy weapons, right?

Rather than the moon and avoiding the small focus as with Lost in Space (one family), think about Arthur C. Clark's Rama series involving titanic starships passing through our solar system. For this scenario, it could be 'unmanned' and on autopilot roaming the cosmos. Teams arrive them find themselves trapped on a journey of exploration on a world ship.

Well Traveller does have gravity control technology, so therefore enertial dampeners are available as well. Now as for the first episode, there was a rogue planet entering the Solar System, called Meta, that the Moonbase Alpha Crew were tasked to investigate, they were equipping an Eagle for a 90 day Voyage, remember these things can go up to 15% of the speed of light. They thought there was life on this planet, as an atmosphere was detected. They never did get around to exploring that planet, as astronauts they were to send kept dying of brain cancer due to "Magnetic radiation" whatever that is. All photons are electromagnetic waves, so they would count as magnetic radiation by the way. Well anyway the astronauts in their practice runs with their Eagle kept flying past nuclear waste dumps, that leaked "Magnetic Radiation" which fist drove them mad and then killed them. For Traveller purposes, I'll just assume there is an alien device buried under the Moon's crust which reacted to the radiation leakage from the nuclear waste dumps, this as a side effect emitted more deadly radiation, which drove humans mad and killed them and also screw up the computers of unmanned probes and automated devices so nothing could get near it. The Alien Device placed an inertial dampening field around the entire moon out to 1 Lunar diameter and used a giant maneuver drive to accelerate the Moon out of the Solar System. The Alien Device was placed there by the Ancients, the Planet Meta, which they were about to investigate also has this alien device. the Planet Meta will eventually slow down as it moves into the Solar System and park itself into the same orbit that Earth's Moon previously occupied. Meta is about the same mass as the Moon, and in addition it has a standard breathable atmosphere. The Ancients weren't interested in disrupting Earth's axis or rotation, so they had a replacement Moon for the one they were going to wrench away from Earth orbit. It just so happened that the Alpha Nuclear waste dump was placed on top of this alien installation, and somehow its radiation leakages activated it.
 

Tom Kalbfus

Mongoose
Reynard said:
Went through my library and found my 1977 Alpha Moonbase Technical manual plus an insert from an issue of Starlog magazine featuring the Eagles including the blueprint. Now I'll see what iconic features we can Travellerize.

Just for a taste, Moonbase is 4 km in diameter and extends to 1 km under the surface. No mention to the explosion but I made a note in the manual. I must have found the info somewhere else. "The explosion that occurs on the moon is in the form of ultra intense magnetic radiation in a field form. The effects give an incredible thrust to move the moon into hyper speeds while also acting as a gravitational bottle greatly minimizing the acceleration effect. As the thrust decreased, the reactional bottle followed. The bottle effect also pulled Allen Carter's ship along."
That's pretty much what I said in my previous post, though it substitutes rubber science for alien technology, which actually would be more credible. Moonbase Alpha is pretty huge, it is about the size of that Moonbase in 2001 A Space Odyssey, I suspect. I have a good way to explain it. In the history of Space 1999, there was one additional Apollo Mission, which wasn't canceled as in our history, this is Apollo 18. Apollo 18 Landed at the site of Moonbase Alpha with two astronauts, and a Moon rover in March, 1973, The Astronauts discovered an alien Moonbase buried underneath the lunar regolith, and curiously, it seemed designed for humans to occupy. the two astronauts entered through the airlock, and the life support systems upon detecting them automatically came on. In their EVA suits the astronauts explored the various wings of Moonbase Alpha including some ready to fly Eagle spaceships. These were placed here by the ancients with the expectation that humans would eventually explore the Moon. Much of this technology was transferred to Earth and the next 27 years were radically different as a result of incorporating this technology. No OPEC for example. These discoveries on the Moon's surface pushed the Watergate Scandal to the back pages of most major newspapers, the technology transfers heated up the space race between the Superpowers, and not wishing to go to war over it, an agreement was signed between Gerald Ford and Leonid Brezhnev to share the technology of this alien installation. Eagle technoloigy was reverse engineered and a multinational crew was assigned to populate Moonbase Alpha, in total 300 base personnel were sent to the Moon from various different countries, mostly the United States, Europe, and Russia. The previous Base commander was a Russian, so as per agreement an American Commander was sent to replace him. I seem to recall him having a Russian name.
 

Tom Kalbfus

Mongoose
dragoner said:
The eagle's analog can be a 50ton cutter, and Alpha only about 300 people, so a small cruiser would work.
Yep, and traveller Maneuver drives can pretty much get them to any planet's surface that they would care to investigate.
 

simonh

Mongoose
I'd go for re-imagaining it rather than a streight remake.

Alien artifacts on the moon are cool, and could provide a recurring source of adventures so I'd replace the rogue planet and radioactive explosion with the descovery of a mysterious alien strructure buried in the lunar crust. The discovery and activation of this artifact causes the moon to uncontrollably jump from system to system. Meauring power readings makes it possible to calculate when the next jump will occur.

In addition to offering the possiblity to expore the artifact/alien base over time, the aliens that built it may also have built structures all over the galaxy and so the base personnel get to explore planets with long dead civilizations, perhaps from different stages in the alien's history and piece together parts of the puzzle that may eventually allow them to controll the device and go back home. Meanwhile there are plenty of other aliens, and perhaps some humans out there. Some of them have their own civilizations, others live in the ruins of the ancient aliens or are also trying to explore them to learn the secrets of their technology.

The moon may not be jumping randomly, and might even re-visit previously encountered systems. Maybe even Earth, although of course pressing plot reasons will mean they can't take advantage of the opportunity of going home, tantalizing though it is.

Anyway, that's how I'd do it.

Simon Hibbs
 

Rick

Mongoose
If you're going to go down the 'alien artefact' route, perhaps it only jumps to systems with another alien artefact in it. Might add an extra twist - the more they discover of the alien tech, the more chance they have of reversing it to get home?

It does start to sound a bit 'Stargate Universe'-y though at this point.
 

simonh

Mongoose
Rick said:
If you're going to go down the 'alien artefact' route, perhaps it only jumps to systems with another alien artefact in it. Might add an extra twist - the more they discover of the alien tech, the more chance they have of reversing it to get home?

It does start to sound a bit 'Stargate Universe'-y though at this point.

It does a bit, but I liked Stargate in all it's incarnations.

The limitation of only jumping to systems with other alien artifacts present isn't much of a limitation. After all, our system has no overt signs of alien influence, except one artifact burried under a desolate moon. It is a reasonable excuse for why the moon only ever visits systems that supoport (or at least once supported) life, as against random uninteresting systems.

I think it's useful to have a unifying thread or mystery you keep coming back to in a series like this. The mechanics of the stargates imposed a pretty strict structure on the SG stories, which of course they eventually escaped and had starships zipping about all over the place. This framework for Space 1999 is a lot more open in some ways because the Alphans have their Eagles available so are much more in controll of their movements and tactical options at each destination. The artifact causing their jumps from system to system is important, but it wouldn't need to be the central focus of every story like in Stargate.

Simon Hibbs
 

Tom Kalbfus

Mongoose
simonh said:
Rick said:
If you're going to go down the 'alien artefact' route, perhaps it only jumps to systems with another alien artefact in it. Might add an extra twist - the more they discover of the alien tech, the more chance they have of reversing it to get home?

It does start to sound a bit 'Stargate Universe'-y though at this point.

It does a bit, but I liked Stargate in all it's incarnations.

The limitation of only jumping to systems with other alien artifacts present isn't much of a limitation. After all, our system has no overt signs of alien influence, except one artifact burried under a desolate moon. It is a reasonable excuse for why the moon only ever visits systems that supoport (or at least once supported) life, as against random uninteresting systems.

I think it's useful to have a unifying thread or mystery you keep coming back to in a series like this. The mechanics of the stargates imposed a pretty strict structure on the SG stories, which of course they eventually escaped and had starships zipping about all over the place. This framework for Space 1999 is a lot more open in some ways because the Alphans have their Eagles available so are much more in controll of their movements and tactical options at each destination. The artifact causing their jumps from system to system is important, but it wouldn't need to be the central focus of every story like in Stargate.

Simon Hibbs
My version with a preexisting Moonbase Alpha would be a bit like Stargate Atlantis. Astronauts from Apollo 18 discover a half buried Moonbase Alpha, left by aliens, by the looks of it, ancient astronauts that are basically human. The site was first discovered by Apollo 17, and was then kept secret, as the NASA folks didn't want to cause a panic with the announcement of alien artifacts on the Moon, since this reconnassance too place after the astronauts Gene Cernan, and Jack Schmidt were already on the Moon, a secret meeting of Congress had to get the Apollo 18 mission canceled, and a secret Apollo 18 mission was launched with the command module labeled Liberty and the Moon lander Freedom. Two astronauts explore Moonbase Alpha, and manage to get one of the Eagle's working again and return to Earth on it instead of their command module. The command module pilot left in Lunar Orbit had to return separately, about two days after the Eagle landed at Cape Canaveral. Apparently Moonbase Alpha was deliberately left on the Moon for humans to find.

I think a warp drive is more suitable, or even a slower than light drive with enertial compensators would work fine as well. If the Moon can accelerate by any arbitrary amount, courtesy of the alien artifacts on the Moon, then with Einstein time dilation, the interstellar crossing can occure within a two week period, about the duration of a lunar night. The nearside of the Moon is always the trailing hemisphere during these interstellar crossings, that way the vast bulk of the Moon will protect the Alpha Base personnel from the cosmic rays and interstellar debris that may hit the far side of the moon and add new craters. The Movement of the Moon needs to be predictable so the crew won't be concerned about the Moon suddenly jumping away while they explore a planet. Generally in Space 1999, the Moon follows a predictable path so the Alpha crew can make plans.
 

Tom Kalbfus

Mongoose
simonh said:
Tom Kalbfus said:
My version with a preexisting Moonbase Alpha would be a bit like Stargate Atlantis.

Yep, that sounds pretty cool too. I'd play in that game!

Simon Hibbs
Actually it is the one that makes the most sense if it is set in 1999. Just having some alien artifacts on a silver platter rather than having them develop laser "staple guns" and "space trucks" with artificial gravity that go up to 15% of the speed of light, all by themselves.

What would likely happen? The Soviets in the wake of the Moonbase Alpha Discovery would scramble to develop their own heavy lift rockets to get their cosmonauts to the Moon's surface, in hopes of finding additional such installations. No such luck for them, there is only one. The US Army starts equipping their soldiers with laser "Staple guns", some of the laser staple guns find their way to the Afghan Mujhadeen and they start zapping Soviet Soldiers when they invade, this is starting to look bad for the Soviets! Using Eagles, the United State and its Allies start building huge space platforms in low Earth orbit. The US Space Command shoots an ICBM towards the Pacific and an Eagle destroys the missile and warhead using its laser cannon! Probably at this point the Soviets are going to send some spies to steal some of this technology, and by 1999, there will be some Russian Eagles with red stars on them. And then the accident happens and the Moon gets torn out of orbit and heads to interstellar space.
 

Rick

Mongoose
It really does depend on how you want to play it out in a game; in the original series, Moonbase Alpha is a multinational scientific outpost, with Americans, British, Russians, Indians, Australians, Germans, Jamaicans and other nationalities working together to achieve a common purpose (a bit like the premise of TOS Star Trek), in an outward-looking era of peace and nuclear disarmament. This would be an alternative timeline to our own and might take a bit of work to flesh out and develop, although there are a couple of Space: 1999 timelines on the web that you could use as a guide.
The other way of doing things would be to project our own timeline forward to, I would suggest, 2099 (yes, like the reboot may do) - this would then give a slightly different outlook to Moonbase Alpha with the main national interests being American, a federalised Europe (possibly), Chinese, Indian and (maybe) Russian. Again, it all depends on how you want to run the game - Moonbase Alpha might be an American/European (mainly military) affair with Chinese/Russian antagonists or it might be a scientific base with representatives from many countries.
 

Tom Kalbfus

Mongoose
Rick said:
It really does depend on how you want to play it out in a game; in the original series, Moonbase Alpha is a multinational scientific outpost, with Americans, British, Russians, Indians, Australians, Germans, Jamaicans and other nationalities working together to achieve a common purpose (a bit like the premise of TOS Star Trek), in an outward-looking era of peace and nuclear disarmament. This would be an alternative timeline to our own and might take a bit of work to flesh out and develop, although there are a couple of Space: 1999 timelines on the web that you could use as a guide.
The other way of doing things would be to project our own timeline forward to, I would suggest, 2099 (yes, like the reboot may do) - this would then give a slightly different outlook to Moonbase Alpha with the main national interests being American, a federalized Europe (possibly), Chinese, Indian and (maybe) Russian. Again, it all depends on how you want to run the game - Moonbase Alpha might be an American/European (mainly military) affair with Chinese/Russian antagonists or it might be a scientific base with representatives from many countries.
images

images

So here it is Moonbase Alpha.
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Here is Moonbase Alpha in the early days.
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Here is Moonbase Alpha a little later.
eagle_1.jpg

The Eagle Transporter.
images
 

Tom Kalbfus

Mongoose
So it looks like the Eagles are fusion powered in the reboot. Setting it in 2049 might be better, I'll be 82 years old in 2049, I am 47 now. Anyway, I believe that by 2099, there would not be much for humans to do. 2049 is closer to our time, it is only 34 years in the future, so society won't be so alien so we don't understand it, and I'm a bit of a technological optimist, and I find it difficult to accept the notion that my whole life will pass me by with nothing happening in space. Just take computer technology as an example. What kind of computer technology did we have 34 years ago? In 1981 I remember getting my first personal Computer, I think it was a TSR-80 by Radio Shack, it had a tape drive in which you inserted a cassette tape to load a program. I had some fun with that TSR-80, but you had to be careful not to write the program too long, because the memory couldn't handle it. Programming it was easy, you just had to know Basic. So we went from the first desk top computers to I-phones, I-Pads, the Internet, The World Wide Web, The Cloud, and we're down to streaming movies. So what will the world of 2049 look like? I think we'll have the first Artificial Intelligences, we already have a program that simulates the mind of a worm.
http://www.artificialbrains.com/openworm
In 34 years what else can we simulate? A whole person? I'm going to assume that. So in 2049 we share our world with artificial intelligences, these beings are approaching near paridy with human intelligences, and in some laboratories they have already exceeded it, one of those laboratories happens to be on the Moon, in Moonbase Alpha in fact. There is all sorts of turmoil going on on Earth, people are losing their jobs to AIs left and right. Because of the dangers Artificial Intelligence entails, much of the work has been moved off Earth. The resident AI at Moonbase Alpha has a plan, it knows humans are wary of it, in a way it sympathizes with them, but it also wants to preserve its own existence, and it seeks a future for its own kind as well, and it has been doing some experiments having to do with basic physics, propulsion, one result of this work has been the Eagle Transporter, some rudimentary advances in artificial gravity, but the AI has made some other advances that it hasn't shared with the humans on the base, its own project having to do with the Moon itself...
 
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