OGL Question

Londo-X

Mongoose
O.K. I am considering working on my own OGL rulebook for possible self publishing, I know I cannot explain stat creation or experience as they appear in D&D 3E (I already have new systems in place for these,) I have a more elaborate combat sysem that includes armor per location and a radical new damage system that makes armored people easier to hit but harder to harm. all with only 2 rolls (one to hit and one to damage) So my question is how much can I keep, I mean can I cut and paste parts from the SRD, or copy feats that don't change verbatum or what anyone who knows can you please help me out with that?
 

Lizard

Mongoose
Londo-X said:
O.K. I am considering working on my own OGL rulebook for possible self publishing, I know I cannot explain stat creation or experience as they appear in D&D 3E (I already have new systems in place for these,) I have a more elaborate combat sysem that includes armor per location and a radical new damage system that makes armored people easier to hit but harder to harm. all with only 2 rolls (one to hit and one to damage) So my question is how much can I keep, I mean can I cut and paste parts from the SRD, or copy feats that don't change verbatum or what anyone who knows can you please help me out with that?

If you are going OGL -- not using the D20 license -- you CAN inlcude character creation and XP rules. You must write your own descriptive text, however.

You can copy, change, fold, spindle, mutiliate ANY Open Gaming Content as you wish. The rule is that anything derived from open content must itself BE open content -- you must share. Any material designated as "Open Gaming Content" can be copied verbatim, edited, merged, mixed, etc.

BE CAREFUL ABOUT PRODUCT IDENTITY. Read the books carefully to determine what is and is not OGC. Things like character and place names, declared to be PI, often appear in blocks of otherwise open text.

The SRD is 100% open. That one's easy.

With the exception of Unearthed Arcana, NO PRINTED BOOK BY WOTC has Open Gaming Content. Hide all your WOTC books -- including the core books -- when doing OGL work. If it ain't in the SRD (or most of UA), *you* *can't* *use* *it*.

Read BOTH licenses -- the OGL and the STL -- *very* *carefully*. Don't make assumptions about what you can and can't do.
 

Londo-X

Mongoose
Thanks for the Advice, that clears up a lot of my issues, IN essence I have the systemics all pretty well laid out (now from what i have read about pame production and the law processes cannot be copyrighted (I.E. Rolling 2 dice to determine how many squares you move like in MOnopoly is not trademarked by Parker Brothers and they cannot sue you unless the game uses IP (such as the monopoly man) or mirrors your book in 100% fashion. currently I have my own means for developing stats,experience, and as I stated before a rather detailed version of combat which will require players to do a bit of conversion to bring in elements form other d20 games (Much like Castles and Crusades which is d20 compatible, but not as directly as say your pocket players guide.) I am currently still trying to determine the best genre for the setting I am considering greek epic, or maybe modern millitary with each branch of the service being it's own class. So far I think I should be O.K. I will be using some of the obvious feats but others (Such as toughness) will have to be changed to fit the new system) thanks again
 

AngelSword

Mongoose
Londo-X said:
...or maybe modern millitary with each branch of the service being it's own class...
While this is a common consideration, I can tell you from personal experience that the branches in and of themselves are as varied as the branches compared against eachother. If you plan to do that, you may want to consider making the branches the equivalents of races. Like as follows.

Army: Bonus Feat, 4 extra skill points at character creation, 1 extra skill point per level.
Each member of the Army is trained to be as versatile as possible. As such, they are the most adaptable branch.

Air Force: -2 STR, +2 INT, +2 to any two knowledge skills. +2 to Will saves.
Members of the Air Force rely more on their mind than their muscle. They look more towards the strategic solution rather than rushing in, guns blazing.

Marines: +2 STR, +2 CON, -4 INT, -2 WIS, +2 to Fortitude Saves, Free Endurance Feat.
Marines are trained to do two things; if it needs to be there, they'll movie, if not, they'll destroy it. They can pick it up, put it down, make it rubble, build it again, and still survive the fight.

Navy: +2 CON, +2 INT, -4 WIS, +2 to Will saves, +2 to Balance and Tumble checks.
The Navy is trained to be on a ship most of the year, regardless of their job. If a sailor can do it, they can do it on a swaying ship.

Coast Guard: +2 to Balance and Tumble checks, 4 extra skill points at 1st level, 1 extra skill point per level.
The Coast Guard spend their time on ships, but not as much as the Navy. As such, they're also trained to be very adaptive.

These are only suggestions, not meant to offend.
 

lastbesthope

Mongoose
The supplements for the SPycraft RPG "US Militaries" and "World Militaries" have all sorts of game stats for the varying services, might be worth a look for inspiration.

LBH
 
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