Fire wont burn there. No fire at all.

Da GUZ

Mongoose
In the movie the wizzard tells both Conan and Subati that "fire wont burn there". But yet fire does burn when Conan torches Valeria's body.

2 questions:
Why did the wizzard think that fire could not burn there?
&
Why was Conan able to make it burn there?

I know these a pretty mundane questions but I'm still curious.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Powerful spirits ruled over those ruins and they wouldn't allow fire to burn in their domain. Perhaps the spirits had a beef with the fire gods.

However, those kings and titans of old would not stop Conan from giving his warrior lover the firey sendoff that she deserved. They recognized him and Valeria for the epic heroes that they were.

At least that's the way I see it...
 

Judge Walker

Mongoose
Or perhaps the pyre was set just outside their area of influence.

More then likely...the script writer just fell asleep at the switch. :D :wink:
 

S'mon

Mongoose
Usually it was too windy and would blow out any fires, but it happened to be an unusually windless night...
 
Judge Walker said:
More then likely...the script writer just fell asleep at the switch. :D :wink:

No way, dude. It was an intentional choice.

"Fire won't burn there" is mentioned explicitly at least twice = we're supposed to go "whoa" when fire DOES burn there.
 

Yuan-Ti

Mongoose
zero skill LPB said:
Judge Walker said:
More then likely...the script writer just fell asleep at the switch. :D :wink:

No way, dude. It was an intentional choice.

"Fire won't burn there" is mentioned explicitly at least twice = we're supposed to go "whoa" when fire DOES burn there.

Whoa! :shock:
 

Iron_Chef

Mongoose
Yuan-Ti said:
zero skill LPB said:
Judge Walker said:
More then likely...the script writer just fell asleep at the switch. :D :wink:

No way, dude. It was an intentional choice.

"Fire won't burn there" is mentioned explicitly at least twice = we're supposed to go "whoa" when fire DOES burn there.

Whoa! :shock:

Double whoa! :shock: Although I thought it was always spelled "whoah".
 
zero skill LPB said:
Judge Walker said:
More then likely...the script writer just fell asleep at the switch. :D :wink:

No way, dude. It was an intentional choice.

"Fire won't burn there" is mentioned explicitly at least twice = we're supposed to go "whoa" when fire DOES burn there.

I went "whoa!!! look at that gaping plot hole!!!"
 

Badelaire

Mongoose
I think in the context of the Hyboria-verse, this little tidbit works well.

"Those mounds are kept by powerful gods and the spirits of kings."

Perhaps these mystical guardians won't let fire burn on the mounds as a symbol of their power, perhaps because of a forgotten legend. OR, perhaps it's just a very windy spot and it's terribly difficult to start fires there. OR, perhaps ancient priests and mystics conjured up such a belief to keep "squatters" off of the mounds.

Ultimately, you can believe any of those explanations you want to, but at least in the context of the film, Valeria's funeral pyre Means Something when it burns where no fire should be able to burn. Conan's world is steeped in superstition, myth, and legend, and when it comes right down to it, the Cause is nowhere near as important as the Effect.

Does Thulsa Doom have mystical mind-control abilities, or is he just an amazing orator with a keen understanding of human nature? It doesn't matter - what matters is that he can build an army from disenchanted, angsty peasants who want revenge on their betters.

You the Conan GMs might want to know just HOW certain effects work in your campaigns, but there is no reason the Players need to know how they work, only that Something creates certain effects. Considering how dangerous and rare sorcery should be, it's not a bad idea to throw in a good number of "sorcerers" who are really just people with really good powers of persuasion, with a few clever tricks and some herbs, poisons, and powders up their sleeves.
 

S'mon

Mongoose
Badelaire said:
Does Thulsa Doom have mystical mind-control abilities, or is he just an amazing orator with a keen understanding of human nature? It doesn't matter - what matters is that he can build an army from disenchanted, angsty peasants who want revenge on their betters.

I thought it was an army of angsty middle-class hippies? :twisted:
You the Conan GMs might want to know just HOW certain effects work in your campaigns, but there is no reason the Players need to know how they work, only that Something creates certain effects. Considering how dangerous and rare sorcery should be, it's not a bad idea to throw in a good number of "sorcerers" who are really just people with really good powers of persuasion, with a few clever tricks and some herbs, poisons, and powders up their sleeves.

REH did this a lot! I just read 'Rogues in the House', a perfect example. No defensive blasts there!
 

Badelaire

Mongoose
Peasants, Hippies, they both wear rags and muck about in the dirt whining all the time. Same diff... :)

One of my many favorite moments in that movie is when Conan's on his trek to the Mountain of Power and he comes across the Hippie Brigade with their tambourines and flower necklaces. Time enough for the earth in the grave, indeed! Bwah hah hah hah!!!

Pure Milius hilarity.
 
another possibility is the beginning sequence with conan and his father on top of the mountain, when father of conan tells the young lad that the gods and the titans warred against each other but left the secret of steel on the battlefield. in order to make steel, you need a fire. perhaps the end is a nod to conan's knowing the riddle of steel?

i thought it was dramatically appropriate to give Valeria a viking funeral, and to prepare conan for his upcoming battle with the veterans of thulsa doom's raiding party.

and considering that we see the spirits in the movie, i'm pretty sure it is safe to say that the area was supposed to be mystically endowed and the wizard was maintaining it, or learning from it.
 

Shonuff

Mongoose
I have the novel of the movie, but the book does not explain this. The scene is slightly different.

As someone who has seen the film more times than I can easily count, that scene to me was related to the supernatural forces the shaman summoned to save Conan's life.

The shaman told Valeria there would be a great price for the use of that magic. When she died and the funeral pyre was set to send off her spirit, those forces came to collect (as represented by the supernatural fire). The pact had indeed been completed. It was the ending of the deal. Her life in exchange for his.
 

August

Mongoose
I personally think Shonuff has it right on the nose here. There is no gaping plot hole as I see it; the 'no fire will burn there' is foreshadowing and setting up the scene for Valeria's funeral pyre. Pure and simple. It was one of the better cinematic touches, for me, in the whole film...

-A
 

Lord Kjeran

Mongoose
Chello!

Badelaire said:
Peasants, Hippies, they both wear rags and muck about in the dirt whining all the time. Same diff... :)

"Well, I didn't vote you...we're an autonomous commune...If i went around claiming to be Emperor..."

Hilarity from Milius...or is that Python? :)
 
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