Does Evil Eye automatically hit?

slaughterj

Mongoose
Do spells, when used with Evil Eye, automatically hit? I get that impression from my reading, as it seems one goes straight to making a saving throw (unless averting or closing eyes). I'm fine with that, just want the clarification.
 

Jason Durall

Mongoose
I don't have my rulebook handy, but I believe that if eye contact is made, Evil Eye spells are assumed to automatically hit.

The Games Master may allow a Reflex save if someone is actively trying not to make eye contact, but if it does, it's straight to the saving throw.
 

sanseveria

Mongoose
for me if the target isn`t trying to avoid the gaze, or is unaware of the sorcerer`s ability, it automatically hits. Plain and simple.

SS
 

Ajonga

Mongoose
A few month back I was frustrated that my Scholar's Evil Eye was not allowed to work in a combat situtation and found the responses on the subject helpful.

Look for the Subject - Need Clarification Evil Eye during Combat.
 

slaughterj

Mongoose
I seem to recall that thread - something about the target being on the other side of someone or some such? Maybe raising their victim over their head, so didn't make contact? But as I recall the consensus was that the contact didn't need to be direct or registered by the target in order to work?
 

LokiOne

Mongoose
What is the combat penalty again for a warrior attacking a Sorceror who is trying to 'Evil Eye' him.

The attacker is trying to hit him while trying not to meet his gaze ... Is it like blind fighting ?
 

Turim

Mongoose
You can choose between closing your eyes, and averting your eyes. Obviously, closing your eyes makes you immune to Evil Eye effects, but you suffer all the penalties of being blind. If I remember correctly, averting your eyes gives you a 50% chance to not meet his gaze. However, he also gains concealment relative to you, which means you have a 20% chance of missing him with your attacks.
 

LokiOne

Mongoose
Seems fair enough ... Most of My Players would say that they were 'averting the sorcerors gaze' - but slicing at him regardless. I had a NPC sorceror 'go down' through massive damage (critical) this way after he was bull rushed, and stabbed in the groin with a poniard ...

Naturally avoiding someones face is not an easy thing to do, especially since 'We' are heavily into non-verbal facial communication.

What kind of range would you say was practically effective, before the sorcerors face/ eyes become just a blob? IE - can an archer ping an enemy sorceror without the gaze chance kicking in, such as a Far Shot?

I can't recall the 'gaze' rules from creatures such as Gorgons. I have no other comparable references.
 

Turim

Mongoose
Evil Eye isn't a real gaze ability. If you're fighting a creature with a gaze attack, you might be subject to the gaze even on your own round. When a sorcerer wants to use an Evil Eye effect, he must be within 30 feet of his target. Unless the target has specified on his own turn that he is averting his eyes, the Evil Eye hits automatically. If the target is averting his eyes, I assume the sorcerer will see this.
 

slaughterj

Mongoose
LokiOne said:
What kind of range would you say was practically effective, before the sorcerors face/ eyes become just a blob? IE - can an archer ping an enemy sorceror without the gaze chance kicking in, such as a Far Shot?

As noted, Evil Eye only has a 30ft range.
 

LokiOne

Mongoose
So - an archer can safely 'ping' an enemy sorceror from outside his Evil Eye range, without the risk of 'gazing into his eyes accidentally'?

I suppose it's the eyes that need to be seen, whereas an archer may be just hoping to hit somewhere on the target's body at greater distances.
 

slaughterj

Mongoose
LokiOne said:
So - an archer can safely 'ping' an enemy sorceror from outside his Evil Eye range, without the risk of 'gazing into his eyes accidentally'?

I suppose it's the eyes that need to be seen, whereas an archer may be just hoping to hit somewhere on the target's body at greater distances.

The effect only has a range of 30ft, so ranged attacks further than that would not result in subjecting the potential target to the effect. Note, again, thinking along the lines of gaze is not appropriate, because it only affects the target in the 30ft area, so another character who is not the target can be within 30ft staring at the caster and not have any concerns.
 
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