Blackholes and Hyperspace

A

Anonymous

Guest
A few facts first

1 - Hyperspace appears to run parrallel to normal space with a point to point equivalent.

2 - Massive object bend normal space, supermassive objects such as black holes bend normal space to the breaking point, causing the known laws of physics to break down.

Now my question is, what happens to hyperspace at the point where it corresponds to such a real space object? Do massive objects in normal space affect hyperspace? This would be paryticularly important for ships passing through or near the galactic core which is dominated by a supermassive black hole. Is this simply a hostile region of hyperspace that ships avoid? If a ship were to venture there, what would they find?

Right now I have an image of a vortex, like a tornado, moving through hyperspace at the point where the black hole would be. Another posibility though would be a point where energy and matter flood into hyperspace, drawn in by the black hole's gravity and released (at least in part) into this parrellel dimensions.

Any thoughts?
 

El Cid

Mongoose
PottsBr said:
A few facts first

1 - Hyperspace appears to run parrallel to normal space with a point to point equivalent.

2 - Massive object bend normal space, supermassive objects such as black holes bend normal space to the breaking point, causing the known laws of physics to break down.

Now my question is, what happens to hyperspace at the point where it corresponds to such a real space object? Do massive objects in normal space affect hyperspace? This would be paryticularly important for ships passing through or near the galactic core which is dominated by a supermassive black hole. Is this simply a hostile region of hyperspace that ships avoid? If a ship were to venture there, what would they find?

Right now I have an image of a vortex, like a tornado, moving through hyperspace at the point where the black hole would be. Another posibility though would be a point where energy and matter flood into hyperspace, drawn in by the black hole's gravity and released (at least in part) into this parrellel dimensions.

Any thoughts?

I'm not sure that your point to point assumption is correct or at least the points in hyperspace would be a lot closer together than in normal space.

It was stated that EA exploration ships were able to detect large masses in normal space while they were in hyperspace and that this is where they'd jump out to see if it was a good place to establish a jump gate.

As for a Black Hole, it was never discussed in the series nor any of the books as I recall, so you can go wild and make your own assumptions/reality. I don't see the tornado analogy but perhaps a white hole could be in hyperspace although I would really doubt that a ship could survive the transition through a black/white hole.

Just my .02 EA Cr.

Sidney
 

Dag'Nabbit

Mongoose
Warning-Rambling theory commencing.

Hyperspace is kinda like the ocean, it has many rivers that feed into it and tides that affect it. Maybe the Blackholes are the source of the gravitational tides with the planets and other celestial bodies merely being the islands and continents that these tides push against.

Maybe the reason the universe is expanding is because the force of the tide from the massive blackhole at its center is pushing all the stellar bodies away through hyperspace.
In realspace distances are longer and require more energy to traverse.
In hyperspace distances are shorter and require less energy.
So, given these to points wouldn't the same amount of energy exerted within hyperspace as well as real space not become a plausible reason that the universe is expanding.

Note that the energy for this expansion would have to come from the masses of all the objects that are being pulled into the blackholes.

OK, that's all the stellar brainstorming I can come up with for now.

What does this mean to your questions? Well, maybe as a result of the force of the tides pushing away from the blackhole in hyperspace these regions are simply not reachable with current engine technologies. If a ship did manage to enter the event horizon from the hyperspace side (somehow exerting enough force to push through the massive tidal pressure without destroying itself), well, I don't know about that. It depends on how you want to define the internal dynamics of a blackhole.

Maybe they are spurted out into realspace only to be sucked back in and essentially slingshotted through hyperspace; kind of like using a planet's gravity to accelerate your ship along a different vector.

Or maybe these are the natural gateways to other galaxies, a way to cross the rifts of nothingness that separates them.

It's your game though, so just like Sydney said, whatever you want.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Both of your posts have interesting ramifications. The fact that large masses can be detected from hyperspace means that they do in fact affect hyperspace. Whatever that effect is, we could expect a super massive object to have a much greater impact. Exactly how the two interact is very important to this question. What are the Explorer Ships detecting?

With the idea that the Black Hole is expelling energy into hyperspace, I think we could expect that the force exerted on anything approaching the event horizon would be such that it would take an infinite amount of energy to overcome it, just as is the case on the inbound side in real space. If you did find a way to overcome it, you'd be crushed by the gravity on the other side and spat back out into hyperspace. Not much fun.

Another posibility would depend on how "close" hyperspace is to real space. A black hole may tunnel through hyperspace to some deeper layer of reality. Such places are known to exist based on the Third Space movie. But...what would the effect look like from hyperspace.

Maybe the better direction for this discussion is the actual connection between normal space and hyperspace. How they interact with eachother, etc. It appears that every point in hyperspace has an equivalent point in real space. From any given place you can open a jump point and pass between in a predictable manner. If this was not the case, navigation would be next to impossible. Even a stationary beacon would be unreliable if the point to point correlation were not consistant or at least predictable.

Large masses in normal space have an effect on hyperspace and can be detected, so what is that effect? Does it matter if the object is a cold rock like a planet versus a hot object like a star? Is matter even the issue? What about large quantities of energy? If we detonate a big fusion bomb in normal space, is a disturbance detectable from hyperspace?
 

Sundog

Mongoose
Since gravity does appear to have an effect in hyper, in fact, more so than in normal space, I doubt you would ever get close enough to a black hole to see it in hyper.

Consider: When Keffer's commander is killed by the wake of the Shadow vessel early in season two, and he can't prove it's existence, the destruction of the Starfury is chalked up to a hyperspace shockwave. This suggest that such shockwaves are reasonably common, like "clear-air turbulance" in Earth's atmosphere.

They also mention that there is a gravity gradiant in hyper down which ships "fall" if they can't maintain position.

Finally, it is mentioned that a large mass can be detected from hyper.

This tells me that gravity has a strong effect in Hyper. Thus, if you were to venture into an area with gravity so strong the very fabric of reality was being ripped apart, as happens in a Black Hole, You would be facing conditions so harsh and extreme no ship could survive long enough to get a look.

Not that it matters. Cygnus X-1, the nearest known BH, is so far away it's unlikely any ship from Earth could carry enough supplies to get there anyway.
 
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