Solomani Confederation (Military)

Discuss the Traveller RPG and its many settings
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Sun Jul 18, 2021 10:21 pm

Confederation Navy: Cheapest Monitor

70. So let's see what we get when we try ten kilotonnes.

71. Planetoid with factor twelve armour, seventy eight and two fifths megastarbux, twenty nine hundred sixty tonnes.

72. Armament, thirty five hundred tonnes, plus sixty five tonnes of turrets.

73. Twelve hundred tonnes factor six reactionary rockets, two hundred forty megastarbux.

74. Total, seven thousand seven hundred twenty five tonnes; spare two thousand two hundred seventy five tonnes.

75. Five hundred, eight hundred forty five, two thousand, total three thousand three hundred forty five power points nominal.

76. That's a tad under four hundred sixty nine tonnes of a chemical power plant; spare eighteen hundred and six tonnes.

77. Sixty tonnes bridge, fifty million megastarbux.

78. Twelve hundred tonnes fuel, twelve percent volume, or one hundred twenty thrust rounds.

79. Three hundred thirty five tonnes fuel, for one day usage by chemical power plant.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Sun Jul 18, 2021 11:58 pm

Confederation Navy: Cheapest Monitor

80. The monitor gets a Captain, arguably three pilots, a commissar, twenty mechanics, ten administrators, one hundred gunners, forty eight engineers, eighteen officers, three medics.

81. Since we're way past five kilotonnes, we can divide the crew by three.

82. It's not clear to me if this applies to gunners, considering you need one for each turret.

83. The commissar would be considered an administrator.

84. In theory, the mechanics need only take care of eighty percent of the volume of a planetoid, assuming it was completely hollowed out.

85. We'll assume that hull armour does need looking after.

86. That would give us sixteen mechanics, divided by three, five and a third, and we'll assign them a petty officer to bring the total to six.

87. Rockets would need thirty fivish engineers, twelvish after division, eleven engineers, two petty officers, and a junior engineering officer.

88. Power plant would need thirteen and a half engineers, four and a half, so four engineers and a petty officer.

89. Two medics, one commissar, three administrators; one hundred gunners, ten gunnery officers.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Mon Jul 19, 2021 3:49 pm

Confederation Navy: Cheapest Monitor

00.0% spherical hull fifty six hundred tonnes, eleven hundred twenty power points, two hundred eighty megastarbux
11.2% armour factor fourteen, three hundred thirteen and three fifth megatarbux
50.0% railgun factor one, five hundred power points, highly technologized, six hundred fifty megastarbux
00.5% turrets, triple lasers, three hundred sixty four
05.0% manoeuvre drive, five hundred sixty megastarbux
-------
66.7%
=====

eighteen hundred three and three fifths megastarbux
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Tue Jul 20, 2021 5:25 pm

Confederation Navy: Cheapest Monitor

90. It's really the gunnery department that can't be realistically reduced, though the military option seems to double everyone else but the spinal tappers.

91. I'd say it was vague, but really the rules seem to have forgotten about fixed mountings, with the exception that pilots tend to control them directly.

92. The spinal mount sort of takes care of forward firing arc, and contorting the flight path to try and position the lasers seems rather dumb.

93. Exceptions would be sandcasters as chaff dispensers.

94. And missile tubes, since the ammunition is self guiding.

95. Fixed mountings have a maximum of three weapon systems attached.

96. Harrier mentions that the only reason two torpedo cradles ae substituted in the Harrier hardpoint, is that there wasn't sufficient space, being originally being constructed for a one tonne turret.

97. Whereas the battery option has been basically discarded by Mongoose, this isn't necessarily the case when the weapon systems are fixedly mounted, and any number can be under the control of a single gunner, though I'd guess that the subsequent salvo can only have one target.

98. Torpedo cradles appear to be default half a tonne, torpedo plus fifty percent.

99. In theory, missile launchers should be the same, missile plus fifty percent, or one eighth of a tonne.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Wed Jul 21, 2021 5:48 pm

Image

Solomani Confederation: Why there is no Secretary for Defence, nor Ministry thereof

Tracey Ullman - British Defense Secretary

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRMIjoZUBC0
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Sat Jul 31, 2021 7:47 pm

The rallying cry of the Confederation:

Go Rim, young Solomani!
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Sun Aug 01, 2021 12:02 pm

Confederation Navy: Officer Rank Insignia

Finally got around to watching the last episode of Lower Decks, probably the only thing worthwhile from the current round of Star Trek spinoffs.

Occasionally, I mention that that the Confederation Navy is eerily similar to Starfleet, I think they should adopt the simplicity of their officer rank insignia, somewhat modified by my preferences.


❍ 0 Midshipman
⬤ 1 Ensign
⬤⬤ 2 Lieutenant
⬤⬤⬤ 3 Commander
⬤⬤⬤⬤ 4 Captain

✦ 5 Counter Admiral
✦✦ 6 Rear Admiral
✦✦✦ 7 Vice Admiral
✦✦✦✦ 8 Fleet Admiral
✦✦✦✦✦ 9 Grand Admiral of the Solomani Confederation Navy

❍ Midshipman
⬤❍ Sublieutenant, brevet rank
⬤⬤❍ Lieutenant Commander
⬤⬤⬤❍ Captain Lieutenant

✧ Commodore, brevet rank, ceremonial rank, honorary rank, courtesy
✧✧ Admiral [of the Fleet], brevet rank, ceremonial rank, honorary rank, courtesy
✧✧✧ Admiral of the Confederation, military distinction (in other words, you really have to have earned it, generally a very successful campaign, as compared to just getting lucky and winning a battle)
✧✧✧✧ [Grand] Admiral of the Solomani Confederation Navy, retired (there is only one five star flag officer at any time in the Confederation, the currently serving Grand Admiral)


⬤ permanent rank [filled circle]
❍ brevetted rank [empty circle]
✦ permanent flag rank [filled four point star]
✧ courtesy flag rank [empty four point star]
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Sun Aug 01, 2021 12:30 pm

Confederation Navy: Officers

0 Midshipman
Officer candidate, considered a temporary commission and placed within the line of command; can also be brevetted by a suitable legal authority

1 Ensign
Permanent commission.

⬤⬤ 2 Lieutenant
Commanding officer of small combatants; department head of intermediate combatants.

⬤⬤⬤ 3 Commander
Commanding officer of intermediate combatants, the cut off line could be ten kilotonnes; department head of large combatants and capital warships.

⬤⬤⬤⬤ 4 Captain
Commanding officer of any capital ship, which means the dreadnoughts, fighter carriers, and for all practical purposes, anything a hundred kilotonnes and above; you need a large enough pool to figure out who to kick up to flag rank, so definitely that would include medium and heavy cruisers, and light cruisers.
Last edited by Condottiere on Tue Aug 17, 2021 10:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Tue Aug 17, 2021 12:38 pm

Confederation Navy: Enlisted Rank Insignia


0 Recruit Rate
Trainee.

1 Apprentice Rate
Entry level slot.

∕∕ 2 Able Rate

∕∕∕ 3 Leading Rate

〈〉 4 Petty Officer
Junior non commissioned officer, entrusted with supervisory duties

〈◇〉 5 Chief Petty Officer

〈◆〉 6 Senior Chief Petty Officer

《◇》 7 Master Chief Petty Officer
Senior non commissioned officer of a commissioned warship, I'm going to say capital and large combatants, such as cruisers.

《◆》 8 Command Chief Petty Officer
Senior non commissioned officer of a major command, such as a fleet, or a naval branch.

《◈》9 Command Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy
Senior enlisted person in the Confederation Navy, and special adviser to the Grand Admiral and the Confederation Naval Staff.
Last edited by Condottiere on Tue Aug 17, 2021 10:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Tue Aug 17, 2021 1:10 pm

Confederation Navy: Enlisted Rank Insignia


⋰ broken stripe

∕ solid stripe

〈〉chevron or angled bracket

◇ empty diamond

◆ solid diamond

◈ empty diamond with solid diamond


comments:
1. This actually turned out to be more difficult than the officer one, because progression wasn't clear to me, nor in a quite linear manner as in the army.
2. I knew I wanted a clear cut off between field and flag officers, and decided it would be at the halfway mark.
3. Single sided chevron is more indicative of army rank.
4. A lot of the more senior non commissioned officer insignia seems overly elaborate, though that may be more a sop to their dignitas and gravitas, and I thought for a modern future Navy, they'd streamline it in the sense they don't need such a visual representation.
5. I looked for an empty diamond with a cross, which I thought would be more appropriate for the Confederation.
6. The circle seemed an elegant way to indicate commissioned officer rank.
7. Four pointed star seemed close enough to a cross, for flag rank.
8. Options were nebula and five pointed star, but four pointed star, separates from traditional five pointed star.
9. You could say, that achieving flag rank could be getting Polarized.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Tue Aug 17, 2021 10:31 pm

Confederation Navy: Frocking

In the United States military, frocking is the practice of a commissioned or non-commissioned officer selected for promotion wearing the insignia of the higher grade before the official date of promotion (the "date of rank"). An officer who has been selected for promotion may be authorized to "frock" to the next grade.[1]

The need to frock is a result of the fact that the number of people who may serve in a particular rank is restricted by federal law. Thus, even though an individual may have been selected for promotion and, for officers, confirmed by the Senate, they must often wait for a vacancy (headroom) to occur in order to be officially promoted.

Frocking customs and policies vary across military services, particularly for enlisted members. In the United States Army a general officer may request authority to frock soldiers of his command. In the United States Air Force, only senior field grade and general officers are usually frocked. The United States Navy makes use of frocking much more frequently than do the Army and the Air Force. An example of this is when all new chief petty officers of the United States Navy are frocked on September 16 of each year, although their official date of rank will be at different times over the next year.

History
The term frocking dates back to the Age of Sail, when communications between the Department of the Navy and ships at sea could take months. News of the promotion of an officer arrived, usually via letters brought by another ship, and often with orders for the newly promoted officer to report to a new ship or station. The ship that brought the news would often take that officer away to his new post. Since the departing officer created a vacancy on the first ship, the captain would often forward a recommendation for promotion for one of the remaining officers, which was to be carried back to the Department of the Navy.

Since one of the symbols of rank was a frock coat, the newly promoted officer would pass his old frock coat to the officer remaining behind and recommended for promotion. Months could go by until the captain's recommendation made it back to the Department of the Navy, was acted upon, made official, and news sent back. In the intervening time, the officer recommended for promotion would be accorded the privileges and authorities of his "new" rank, but would not receive the pay for it, since it was not yet official. Because it was not yet official, and because he was still wearing the old frock coat of the recently departed and (officially) promoted officer, the officer recommended for promotion was considered "frocked".

According to current Department of Defense policy, there is no limit to the number of two-, three-, and four-star generals (or admirals) who may be frocked at any one time. However, the number of frocked brigadier generals or rear admirals (lower half) is restricted. Three- and four-star generals are generally frocked if headroom is not available to promote them at the time of the assumption of their new assignment. This is due both to the close relationship between these ranks and the position held, and to the fact that these are considered "positions of importance and responsibility" in accordance with 10 USC § 601. For all other officers frocking is normally reserved for joint, international, or other high-visibility positions that require the higher rank for diplomatic, protocol, or command authority reasons.[2]

Restrictions
Army and Navy
An officer must be on an approved and confirmed promotion list.
An officer must not be under a suspension of favorable personnel actions.
Authority to wear the grade of rank to which frocked will not be recorded in official orders.
A frocked officer is not entitled to the pay and allowances commensurate with the grade of rank to which frocked.
A frocked officer does not accrue seniority for future promotion consideration.
Frocked time does not count as time-in-grade in the grade of rank to which frocked, for retirement purposes.
If an officer dies or is injured while in a frocked status, compensation will be based upon the officer's actual grade without regard to the grade or rank to which the officer was frocked.
Functions which by law or DoD directive must be performed by an officer who actually holds a particular grade or rank (such as UCMJ actions or signing substantive legal documents), may not be performed by an officer frocked to that grade or rank. However, functions which by regulation require performance by an officer of a particular grade or rank may be performed by an officer frocked to that grade or rank, if specifically permitted by the regulation concerned.
An officer may continue to wear the rank to which frocked upon a change of duty or permanent change of station (PCS) unless removed from the promotion list.
Air Force
Frocking occurs on rare occasions when officers are selected for promotion to a higher rank, but have yet to reach the effective date of promotion. For frocking to occur in the Air Force, an unusual set of circumstances must be present to justify wearing the higher rank before the promotion becomes effective. For example, in 2005, two U.S. Air Force lieutenant colonels selected for promotion to colonel were brevetted (frocked) colonel about six months ahead of their effective dates of promotion because of the high-profile nature of the duties that they were performing.[citation needed]

Benefits
A frocked officer may:[2]

wear the insignia and uniform of the higher rank.
use the higher rank when signing officer and enlisted evaluation forms, awards and decorations, and documents dealing with protocol, such as military etiquette and precedence.
accept general officer housing if assigned based on position, not rank.
accrue all the privileges afforded by custom or regulation to this rank.
obtain ceremonial (and command) flags.
obtain and use protocol ("flag") stationery.
obtain parking stickers for the frocked rank.
update ID card, official photo and biography reflecting the higher grade.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Tue Aug 17, 2021 10:33 pm

Confederation Navy: Acting rank

An acting rank is a designation that allows a soldier to assume a military rank — usually higher and usually temporary — without the pay and allowances appropriate to that grade. An acting officer may be ordered back to the previous grade. This situation may arise when a lower-ranking officer is called upon to replace a senior officer, or fill a position higher than the current rank held.

Address
When addressing an individual with an acting rank, the person should be addressed as if the full rank were held. For example, a member who is an acting master seaman would be addressed as "Master Seaman Smith", and not "Acting Master Seaman Smith" ("acting" is a designation, not a rank). In writing, the acting nature of the rank may or may not be spelled out, so that forms such as "acting captain", "captain (acting)" or "captain" are used. Documents dealing with rank, seniority and promotion will tend to spell out the acting nature of the rank, and informal documents will tend to avoid it, but there is no general rule.[citation needed]

Usage by United States
Army
In the United States Army acting ranks were often referred to as "acting jack" offering enlisted members E-1 to E-3 and specialist E-4 hard stripe corporal E-4 or sergeant E-5 to fill leadership positions. In the United States Army hard stripe ranks of corporal E-4 and sergeant E-5 held a higher rank than a specialist four E-4 or specialist five E-5 regardless of time in grade. The United States Army used specialist five E-5 and specialist six E-6 until October 1, 1985 when all specialist fives and specialist sixes were laterally promoted to sergeant E-5 and staff sergeant E-6. Acting jack ranks of corporal and sergeant were offered to establish a clear chain of command in positions considered excess responsible for multiple commands or that lacked a ranking member of a military occupational specialty (MOS) requiring a section, platoon or squad leader.[citation needed]

Navy
In the United States Navy, acting appointments were common during the 19th century. The number of commissioned naval officers at each rank in the Navy was fixed by Congress, so it was difficult to fill vacancies if the number of officers needed to man ships exceeded that fixed number of officers allowed by Congress. Acting appointments were also common with warrant officers and ratings, although neither were subject to congressional approval and were simply temporary assignments. The regulations stated that in the United States, acting appointments were not allowed unless specifically authorized by the Department of the Navy. In most other cases, only the commander-in-chief of a fleet or squadron would be authorized to appoint an officer to fill a vacancy, and this order would be subject to approval of the Department of the Navy. In this way, the Department of the Navy was able to fill vacancies while the Navy grew before Congress took action to permanently increase the number of officers. Outside of the United States and not part of a fleet or squadron, the commanding officer of the ship was allowed to appoint officers to a higher rank in the case of death on board the ship.[1]

The officer was temporarily appointed to the higher rank, appended "acting" to his new rank, wore the uniform of the higher rank, and was addressed and paid at the higher rank. When the ship returned to the United States, or joined a fleet or squadron, the appointment was subject to review by the commander-in-chief of the fleet or squadron or the Department of the Navy.[1]

Another type of temporary appointment was an "order to perform". This was issued in a similar manner to an acting appointment for a lower grade officer to perform the duties of a higher grade officer, except that their pay, rank and uniform remained at the lower grade.[1]

Similar to the many brevet ranks in the Union Army, acting appointments were extremely common during the American Civil War. Congress authorized the Department of the Navy to purchase vessels and appoint acting or volunteer officers to man them until the end of the conflict.[2] By the end of the War, most officers were appointed to a higher acting rank, and their appointments lasted until the end of the war at which point many were discharged from the Navy.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Tue Aug 17, 2021 10:34 pm

Confederation Navy: Brevet

In many of the world's military establishments, a brevet (/brəˈvɛt/ (About this soundlisten) or /ˈbrɛvɪt/ (About this soundlisten))[1] was a warrant giving a commissioned officer a higher rank title as a reward for gallantry or meritorious conduct but may not confer the authority, precedence, or pay of real rank.[2] An officer so promoted was referred to as being brevetted (for example, "he was brevetted Major General"). The promotion would be noted in the officer's title (for example, "Bvt. Maj. Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlain" or "Bvt. Col. Arthur MacArthur").

It is not to be confused with a Brevet d'état-major in Francophone European military circles, where it is an award, nor should it be confused with temporary commissions.

France
In France, brevet is a word with a very broad meaning, which includes every document giving a capacity to a person. For instance, the various military speciality courses, such as military parachutism, are ended by the award of a brevet.

The more important brevet in the French military is the one of the École de guerre, the French Staff College. Between 1870 and 1940, an officier breveté was a graduate of the École supérieure de guerre.[3] Nowadays, while many officers still attend the école de guerre, they do not use the term officier breveté.

The French military does not use brevets to give officers a higher standing, employing temporary commissions instead.[4] As an example, Charles de Gaulle was promoted "provisional brigadier general" (général de brigade à titre provisoire) in 1940 when he was commander of an armoured division.

Germany
In the Prussian and German army and navy, it was possible to bestow a Charakter rank on officers that was in many respects similar to a brevet rank. For example, an Oberst could receive the Charakter als Generalmajor. Very often, German officers would be promoted to the next higher Charakter rank on the day of their retirement.

Spain
It was not uncommon during the 19th century to distinguish between empleo ("employed") rank and graduación ("grade") being the effective command position. In the 1884 rank regulations (which with minor modifications were in force during the Spanish–American War) stars marked the rank whilst the actual post was reflected in gold lace on the cuffs.

As in practice both situations coincided the system was dropped in 1908 leaving only the starred system of denoting rank. Nevertheless, during the Spanish Civil War the system was revived in the Nationalist side due to the lack of trained officers because of the enlargement of the army. The breveted officers (known as habilitados or estampillados) wore their actual rank on the cuffs but their brevetted one in a rectangular black patch on the left breast of their coats or shirts.

United Kingdom
In the United Kingdom the brevet commission was only by courtesy. Officially, both titles were used, as: "Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Cornwallis". Originally the term designated a promotion given on such occasions as a coronation, or the termination of a great war, and had its origin during the reign of King James II (1685–1688); but it was abused so frequently and used to such an extent by the general award of brevet commissions that from 1854, during the Crimean War of 1853–1856 and subsequently, its bestowal was limited by the government strictly to cases of very distinguished service in the field and on the principle of seniority. The British Army confined brevet commissions to ranks from captain to lieutenant-colonel.

The brevet conferred rank in the British Army overall, but importantly, not in the regiment. Advancement in the regiment could take place generally only by purchase until 1871 or by seniority, with the exception of the Royal Regiment of Artillery and the Royal Engineers where it has never been possible to buy commissions and promotion was based on merit, and when there was a suitable vacancy caused by the death, retirement or promotion of a more senior officer. For an officer on duty with his regiment, only regimental rank counted. If the regiment formed part of a larger formation then brevet rank could be used to determine command of temporary units formed for special purposes.[5]

In particular brigadier did not become a permanent rank until 1947, so command of brigades was determined by seniority, including by the date of promotion to any brevet rank. Thus it was possible for a regimental major to hold a brevet lieutenant-colonelcy with seniority over the commission of his own commanding officer as lieutenant-colonel and be given command of a brigade, potentially including his own regiment. Similarly, while the officer served in a staff position or as an aide-de-camp, then he could use his brevet rank. Appointment to a brevet also counted towards the requirement to have served for a sufficient time in a lower rank to be eligible for promotion (by purchase) to a more senior one.[5]

United States
The Articles of War adopted by the United States Army in 1776 and slightly revised in 1806 established the use and significance of brevet ranks or awards in the U.S. Army. When first used, a brevet commission in the U.S. Army entitled the officer to be identified by a higher rank, but the award had limited effect on the right to higher command or pay. A brevet rank had no effect within the officer's current unit. When assigned duty at the brevet rank by the U.S. President, such an officer would command with the brevet rank and be paid at the higher rank.[6]

This higher command and pay would last only for the duration of that assignment. The brevet promotion would not affect the officer's seniority and actual permanent rank in the army.[6] Beginning on April 16, 1818, brevet commissions also required confirmation by the United States Senate, just as all other varieties of officer commissions did.[7]

Early use
Brevets were first used in the U.S. Army during the American Revolutionary War. Often, the nation's Continental Congress could not find suitable positions for foreign officers—mostly from France—who sought commissions. The first U.S. brevet was given to Jacques Antoine de Franchessin on July 20, 1776, allowing him to hold the rank of lieutenant colonel within the Continental Army. Franchessin and another 35 men of foreign birth would hold brevet commissions in the army by the end of the war. By 1784, an additional 50 officers would receive brevets for "meritorious services" during the conflict.[6]

In the 19th-century U.S. Army, brevet promotions were quite common because the army had many frontier forts to garrison and other missions to perform but could not always appoint appropriately ranked officers to command these forts or missions. The U.S. Congress permitted only a limited number of officers of each rank. Thus, an officer of lower rank might receive a brevet commission to a rank more appropriate for his assignment. Also, newly commissioned officers often received brevet rank until authorized positions became available.[8]

For example, an officer might graduate from West Point and be appointed a brevet second lieutenant until a permanent second lieutenant posting opened up. In early 1861, some recent graduates of West Point temporarily were named brevet second lieutenants because not enough Regular Army officer vacancies were available to give them commissions as regular second lieutenants.[8] In addition to officers being appointed to a brevet rank to temporarily serve in positions designated for higher-ranked officers (i.e., in lieu of promotion to permanent rank), officers might be awarded brevet rank as recognition for gallantry or meritorious service.

American Civil War
During the American Civil War, almost all senior officers received some form of brevet award, mainly during the final months of the war. But these awards were made for gallantry or meritorious service, rather than for command. In addition to the authorization in a previous law for awards of brevet ranks to Regular Army officers, an act of Congress of March 3, 1863, authorized the award of brevet rank to officers of the United States Volunteers.[9] Thus, brevet awards became increasingly common later in the war.[10]

Some officers even received more than one award. Because of the existence of both Regular Army and United States Volunteers ranks, and the possibility that an officer could hold actual and brevet ranks in both services, some general and other officers could hold as many as four different ranks simultaneously. For example, by the end of the war, Ranald S. Mackenzie was a brevet major general of volunteers, an actual, full-rank brigadier general of volunteers, a brevet brigadier general in the United States Regular Army, and an actual Regular Army captain.[10]

Brevet rank in the Union Army, whether in the Regular Army or the United States Volunteers, during and at the conclusion of the American Civil War, may be regarded as an honorary title which conferred none of the authority, precedence, nor pay of real or full rank.[11] The vast majority of the Union Army brevet ranks were awarded posthumously or on or as of March 13, 1865, as the war was coming to a close.[11] U.S. Army regulations concerning brevet rank provided that brevet rank could be claimed "in courts-martial and on detachments, when composed of different corps" and when the officer served with provisional formations made up of different regiments or companies, or "on other occasions".[11] These regulations were vague enough to support the positions of some brevet generals who caused controversies by claiming supposed priorities or privileges of brevet ranks that had been awarded to them at earlier dates during the war.[11]

Some full-rank brigadier generals in the United States Volunteers (USV) in the American Civil War had been awarded brevet brigadier general rank in the USV before receiving full-rank promotions to brigadier general of United States Volunteers. Some full-rank brigadier generals in the USV were awarded the rank of brevet major general in the USV, but were not promoted to full-rank major generals in the USV. Some United States Regular Army officers who served with the USV in ranks below general officer were awarded brevet general officer rank in the USV, but were not promoted to full-rank general officers in the USV.

On the other hand, at least a few USV general officers also were awarded brevet general officer rank in the Regular Army in addition to their full-rank appointments or brevet general officer awards in the United States Volunteers. Many of the Regular Army officers of lower rank who became full-rank USV generals, however, received neither actual promotions to a general officer rank nor brevet general officer awards in the Regular Army in addition to their USV ranks or awards. Some of them who stayed in the United States Regular Army after the war did achieve general officer rank in later years.

In addition to the brevet awards to current (or future) full-rank United States Volunteers (USV) generals during the American Civil War, 1,367 other USV officers of lower ranks were awarded the rank of brevet brigadier general, brevet major general, or both, in the United States Volunteers, but not promoted to full-rank USV generals.[12] At least one enlisted man, Private Frederick W. Stowe, was brevetted as a second lieutenant in the Union Army during the Civil War.[13]

The Confederate States of America had legislation and regulations for the use of brevets in their armed forces, provided by Article 61 of the nation's Articles of War, and by their 1861 Army Regulations, which were based on the U.S. Army's 1857 version of their regulations. Although Article 61 was revised in 1862, it ultimately had no practical effect since the Confederate States Army did not use any brevet commissions or awards during its existence.[14]

The United States Marine Corps also issued brevets. After officers became eligible for the Medal of Honor, a rare Marine Corps Brevet Medal was issued to living officers who had been brevetted between 1861 and 1915.[15]

Modern usage
The practice of brevetting disappeared from the (regular) U.S. military at the end of the 19th century; honors were bestowed instead with a series of medals. Brevetting was declared obsolete in 1922.[16] However, the similar practice of frocking continues in four of the six branches of the U.S. armed forces. The U.S. Air Force does not allow the regular practice of frocking before a promotion date, except in rare circumstances, such as when an officer selected for promotion is assigned to a billet (typically a senior joint duty assignment), that requires them to hold/wear the higher rank to which they are expected to be promoted. Frocking typically requires special approval to be obtained from the service headquarters.[17]

The promotion of an enlisted person or non-commissioned officer to commissioned officer rank as a reward for displaying leadership and bravery is referred to as a direct appointment rather than a brevet. It temporarily grants up to the rank of first lieutenant. The holder must then attend Officer Candidate School in order to keep the commission. They must also have or acquire a four-year college degree if they wish to be promoted to the rank of captain or above.

The U.S. National Guard, which depends on the governor of a state to concede its commissions in the Army National Guard and Air National Guard, may still confer brevets. Many states maintain a clause permitting the governor to confer any rank in its defense forces, including the militia and National Guards. Some states provide that the sitting governor may confer any rank, but this appointment is considered valid only for the duration of the governor's own term in office.

Some states also confer brevets as part of their regular honors system. Georgia confers honorary ranks into its state police force. Kentucky is famous for its colonels, and so too is Tennessee, both of which make the appointment as an honorary member of the governor's staff. Alabama, Kentucky, Texas and Nebraska also confer flag officer ranks within a symbolic navy. Similar honors have been issued for the Georgia Naval Militia, which has existed only on paper since 1908. In all cases these honorary titles may be considered effective brevets, equal to that of the National Guard, by being conferred by a sitting governor.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Thu Aug 19, 2021 11:40 pm

Confederation Navy: Standard Ground Vehicles


Light Ground Vehicles, wheeled

1. Bicycles, half a tonne(?), all terrain vehicle.

2. Motorcycles, one tonne, all terrain vehicle.

3. Buggies, two tonnes, all terrain vehicle.

4. Jeeps, five tonnes, all terrain vehicle.

5. Minibuses, ten tonnes, all terrain vehicle.


Heavy Ground Vehicle, wheeled, one hundred twenty spaces

6. Trucks, thirty tonnes, all terrain vehicles

7. Busses, thirty tonnes

8. Rural expeditionary vehicles, thirty tonnes, all terrain vehicle

9. Tunneller, thirty tonnes
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Fri Aug 20, 2021 10:34 am

Confederation Navy: Standard Ground Vehicles


Light Ground Vehicles, wheeled

1. Bicycles, half a tonne(?), all terrain vehicle.
I think they'll be battery assisted, otherwise you could source them locally; also, half a tonne seems high.

2. Motorcycles, one tonne, all terrain vehicle.
One tonne is pretty high as well; useful for reconnaissance, but I think numbers would be limited, as a buggy would have better capacity.

3. Buggies, two tonnes, all terrain vehicle.
Standard ultralight ground transporter.

4. Jeeps, five tonnes, all terrain vehicle.
Standard light personnel ground transporter.

5. Minibuses, ten tonnes, all terrain vehicle.
Personnel mover, basis for family of utility ground vehicles.


Heavy Ground Vehicle, wheeled, one hundred twenty spaces

6. Trucks, thirty tonnes, all terrain vehicles
Basis for family of heavy utility ground vehicles.

7. Busses, thirty tonnes
Large urban personnel mover.

8. Rural expeditionary vehicles, thirty tonnes, all terrain vehicle
Self explanatory; boots on the ground.

9. Tunneller, thirty tonnes
Suspect faster and more reliable than laser drills and mining drones.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Fri Aug 20, 2021 5:12 pm

Confederation Army: Officer Rank Insignia

This is probably subject to some change.

❚ 0 Ensign
[] 1 Lieutenant
[][] 2 Captain
[][][] 3 Major
[][][][] 4 Colonel

★ 5 Brigadier General
★★ 6 Major General
★★★ 7 Lieutenant General
★★★★ 8 Colonel General
★★★★★ 9 General of the Solomani Confederation Army

❚ Ensign
[]❚ First Lieutenant, brevet rank
[][]❚ Staff Captain
[][][]❚ Lieutenant Colonel

☆ Brigadier, brevet rank, ceremonial rank, honorary rank, courtesy
☆☆ General [of the Army], brevet rank, ceremonial rank, honorary rank, courtesy
☆☆☆ General of the Confederation, military distinction (in other words, you really have to have earned it, generally a very successful campaign, as compared to just getting lucky and winning a battle)
☆☆☆☆ General of the Solomani Confederation Army, retired (there is only one five star general officer at any time in the Confederation, the currently serving General of the Solomani Confederation Army)


[] permanent rank [bar]
❚ brevetted rank [bar]
★ permanent general rank [filled five point star]
☆ courtesy general rank [empty five point star]
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Fri Aug 20, 2021 9:12 pm

Confederation Army: Enlisted Rank Insignia


0 Recruit

⟨ 1 Private

⟨⟨ 2 Corporal
Junior non commissioned officer, team leader.

⟨⟨⟨ 3 Sergeant
Junior non commissioned officer, squad leader.

⟨⟨⟨) 4 First Sergeant
Senior non commissioned officer in a platoon.

⟨⟨⟨)) 5 Staff Sergeant
Senior non commissioned officer in a platoon.

⟨⟨⟨))) 6 Master Sergeant
Senior non commissioned officer in a company.

⟨⟨⟨⊙))) 7 Sergeant Major
Senior non commissioned officer in a battalion.

⟨⟨⟨⍟))) 8 Command Sergeant Major
Senior non commissioned officer in a general tier formation or command.

⟨⟨⟨⊕))) 9 Command Sergeant Major of the Solomani Confederation Army
Senior non commissioned officer in the Solomani Confederation Army, and special adviser to the General of the Solomani Confederation Army and the Confederation Army General Staff.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Sat Aug 21, 2021 11:18 am

Confederation Navy: Subsidiary Organizations

I'm probably missing something, since the Confederation Navy is supposedly an all encompassing military and paramilitary organization, except for dirtside combat (supposedly), but the following should be considered subsidiaries:

1. Solomani Confederation Marine Corps
specialized protected forces combat and shock troops

2. Naval Construction Battalions
someone has to build forward infrastructure while under fire; apparently, combat demolition experts

3. Confederation Authorized Volunteer Armed Long Range Yeomanry
I invented this, to have fun with small sized mercenaryesque organizations, and give the Confederation a cheap alternative to sending or basing the Marines; I do need to point this out, because these roles could be filled by mercenaries and the Confederation Army, except that I think the Grand Admiral wants to exert more control, with proportionate force and economy of effort, because I see a deployment of all or part of a Fleet Squadron with accompanying Marine contingent as a rather blunt instrument

4. Solomani Interstellar Exploration Corps
while the Confederation Navy is supposedly Starfleet, and despite such missions being voluntary, considering Traveller hyperspace technology, are going to run longer than five years, and for that you're going to need a rather special breed of adventurers, a combination of seconded naval personnel, retired military personnel, and civilian sub contractors
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Sat Aug 21, 2021 11:52 am

Confederation Navy: Subsidiary Organizations


Military Sealift Command (MSC) is an organization that controls the replenishment and military transport ships of the United States Navy. Military Sealift Command has the responsibility for providing sealift and ocean transportation for all US military services as well as for other government agencies. It first came into existence on 9 July 1949 when the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) became solely responsible for the Department of Defense's ocean transport needs. The MSTS was renamed the Military Sealift Command in 1970.

Military Sealift Command ships are made up of a core fleet of ships owned by the United States Navy and others under long-term-charter augmented by short-term or voyage-chartered ships.[1] The Navy-owned ships carry blue and gold stack colors, are in service with the prefix USNS (United States Naval Ship), rather than in commission (with a USS prefix), have hull numbers as an equivalent commissioned ship would have with the prefix T- and are primarily civilian manned by either civil service mariners[2] or contract crews (see United States Merchant Marine) as is the case of the special mission ships.[3] Some ships may have Navy or Marine Corps personnel on board to carry out communication and special mission functions, or for force protection.[4] Ships on charter or equivalent, retain commercial colors and bear the standard merchant prefix MV, SS, or GTS, without hull numbers.

Eight programs compose Military Sealift Command: Fleet Oiler (PM1), Special Mission (PM2), Strategic Sealift (PM3), Tow, Salvage, Tender, and Hospital Ship (PM4), Sealift (PM5), Combat Logistics Force (PM6), Expeditionary Mobile Base, Amphibious Command Ship, and Cable Layer (PM7) and Expeditionary Fast Transport (PM8).

MSC reports to the Department of Defense's Transportation Command for defense transportation matters, to the Navy Fleet Forces Command for Navy-unique matters, and to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) for procurement policy and oversight matters.[5]



So, Military Spacelift, or Starlift, Command, plus the Merchant Marine, seem like organizations that would be activated in wartime, in terms of how I believe that the Confederation operates.

As I understand the reasoning behind it, it's somehow cheaper to operate the ships with civilian personnel, whereas I think that the Confederation Navy wants as many sailors under their direct control as possible, even if they do stuff such as simple transport or Coast Guardy things.
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Re: Solomani Confederation (Military)

Postby Condottiere » Sun Aug 22, 2021 1:05 pm

Image

Confederation Authorized Volunteer Armed Long Range Yeomanry

The C.A.V.A.L.R.Y. originally was named something else, and basically trying to Tetris in something comprehensible into an acronym, more specifically backronym, that's connected to the military, and implies mercenary, and sort of a sandbox for my version of Space marine chapters.

Also, didn't really want to deal with the Confederation Army.

If I recall correctly, it was watching the original promotional video for Overwatch that convinced me to settle for C.A.V.A.L.R.Y..

I didn't want to go with the thousand man limitation set by the Smurfs, since I felt that never really made sense except in the historical sense, in that battalions were supposedly nominally that size, and a chapter really should be closer to divisional size, considering all the requisite infrastructure and support personnel, plus the ability to absorb attrition and self regeneration. Also, a thousand people is way above the Monkeighsphere, even if you live for centuries.

A reinforced company tends to peter out at two hundred fifty, so I decided to make the presumption that a Solomani military or paramilitarty unit doesn't trigger the need to have an integral Commissar until it has three hundred permanent personnel, though undercover operatives have likely been infiltrated. Interestingly enough, the Dunbar's number has been averaged out to one hundred fifty stable relationships, which is about the size of an army company, and ranges between a hundred to two hundred fifty.

Space Marine chapters are successor organizations to the original Legions, so for the C.A.V.A.L.R.Y. squadrons, that would be the Regiment, which I felt would be distributed one per subsector; the number of squadrons in existence at any one time would depend on perceived current need. The problem with Traveller is transition time at interstellar distances, so decentralization made more sense.

A lot involves reverse engineering, rather than letting the organization grow organically.

I tend to see the Confederation military follow a more flat hierarchical structure, though Home Guards have the freedom to organize as they wish, but are encouraged to cap their paygrades at tier nine, since only a handful individuals should qualify for that in the Confederation, and all of those would be directly involved in the Confederation hierarchy, such as the Grand Admiral.

Since the C.A.V.A.L.R.Y. are a subsidiary of the Confederation Navy, that would be easy to impose, but rather harder to reverse engineer.

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