Ship Design Philosophy

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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:33 pm

Spaceships: What's hiding in SpaceX's Starship?

In this Episode, we will take a look at what happens inside SpaceX's Starship SN5, while pressure testing goes on. We will take a dive into the internal setup of a Starship and see, how it all works. We will also take a look at Rocket Lab's latest launch "Pics or it didn't happen" and how it... didn't happen and what the implications might be for Rocket Lab's future.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fP8ZiOi10w



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Space flight can be very unforgiving.

Then you fall down the rabbit hole.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby NOLATrav » Tue Jul 14, 2020 11:47 pm

What do you make of the latest ISS mission’s astronauts saying the Starship was a “rough ride” compared to previous rockets? Musk doesn’t seem to be the kind of guy to cut corners (other than his stance on COVID-induced factory shutdowns I suppose) and certainly the sexy cockpit was impressive. But rough ride seems like a bad description of a new iteration of tech that’s been around a half-century or so.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Sigtrygg » Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:38 am

There have been no starship launches yet, and definitely no manned ones.

Are you referring to the Dragon launched atop a falcon 9?
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby NOLATrav » Wed Jul 15, 2020 3:35 pm

Yes, the Dragon launch. My apologies. Root canal yesterday, go figure.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Geir » Wed Jul 15, 2020 4:14 pm

If I remember the interview correctly, the first stage ride was smoother (no solids like the shuttle) but the second stage rougher. Since the shuttle had three main engines and the Falcon second stage only one, then it could just be a matter of the three shuttle engines evening out each engine's occasional "roughness" with no such "averaging" happening with a single engine.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Wed Jul 15, 2020 5:58 pm

Astronauts say riding Falcon 9 rocket was “totally different” from the space shuttle
June 12, 2020 Stephen Clark

Astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken say SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket was a “very pure flying machine” as it sped their Crew Dragon spaceship into orbit, but they said they were surprised by the rougher-than-expected ride on the Falcon 9’s powerful upper stage.

Hurley and Behnken became the first people to ride a Falcon 9 rocket into space May 30 after lifting off from pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Around 19 hours later, their Crew Dragon capsule autonomously docked with the International Space Station to complete the first trip to the orbiting outpost from a U.S. spaceport since the retirement of the space shuttle in 2011.

Each astronaut launched on two space shuttle flights before flying on SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon capsule.

“From the time the engines lit, the first two-and-a-half minutes to staging was about like we expected, except you can never simulate the Gs, so as the Gs built you could certainly feel those,” said Hurley, the Dragon’s spacecraft commander. “What I thought was really neat was how sensitive we were to the throttling of the Merlin engines. That was really neat. You could definitely sense that as we broke Mach 1.

“The next thing you know, the call was made (as we exceeded the speed of sound),” Hurley said. “We didn’t even need to look at the speed. You could tell just by how the rocket felt, so it’s a very pure flying machine.”

Hurley, a retired U.S. Marine Corps colonel, flew F/A-18 jets as a test pilot before his selection as a NASA astronaut. Behnken, who earned a doctorate in mechanical engineering from Caltech, is a colonel in the U.S. Air Force and was a flight test engineer on the F-22 fighter jet before becoming a NASA astronaut.

Both have accumulated thousands of hours of flying time on more than 25 types of aircraft.

The Crew Dragon astronauts said the ride on the Falcon 9 rocket was smoother than the space shuttle for the first couple of minutes. The space shuttle launched with two solid rocket boosters, which provided more than two-thirds of the shuttle’s total thrust at liftoff.

The solid-fueled boosters burned for more than two minutes, firing concurrently with the shuttle’s three hydrogen-fueled main engines. The shuttle’s engines continued burning after booster separation, and fired more than eight minutes until engine cutoff after placing the vehicle on a preliminary suborbital trajectory. The shuttle orbiter used smaller thrusters to reach a stable orbit around Earth.

“Remember, shuttle had solid rocket boosters to start with,” Hurley said. “Those burned very rough for the first two-and-a-half minutes. The first stage with Falcon 9 were the nine Merlin engines.”

The Merlin engines generated about 1.7 million pounds of thrust at full power, consuming a mix of super-chilled kerosene and cryogenic liquid oxygen propellants.

“It was a much smoother ride, obviously, because it was a liquid engine ascent,” Hurley said of the Falcon 9’s first stage.

On a space shuttle launch, astronauts said the ride became smoother after burnout and separation of the twin solid rocket boosters, once the shuttle’s liquid-fueled engines took over the primary propulsion role.

“We were surprised a little bit at how smooth things were off the pad,” Behnken said. “The space shuttle was a pretty rough ride heading into orbit with the solid rocket boosters, and our expectation was ,as we continued with the flight into second stage, that things would basically get a lot smoother than the space shuttle did. But Dragon was huffing and puffing all the way into orbit.

“It was not quite the same ride the smooth ride as the space shuttle was up to MECO (main engine cutoff),” Behnken said. “A little bit less Gs, but a little bit more alive is probably the best way I would describe it.”

“Where the differences started, I think, for both Bob and I — and we commented on it at the moment — was at staging,” Hurley said. “And it was very similar to what you saw in the Apollo 13 movie, where they staged from first to second stage. So the first stage engines shut off … (the first stage separates) and then the Merlin Vacuum engine starts.

“So at that point we go from roughly 3Gs to zero Gs … and when the Merlin Vacuum engine fires, then we start accelerating again for the next five or six minutes until we achieve orbit,” he said.

“That was the highlight of the ascent for me,” Hurley said.

“So totally different than shuttle,” Hurley said. “It was smooth. It got a little rougher.”

SpaceX developed the Crew Dragon spacecraft under contract to NASA. The space agency is also working with Boeing on the Starliner crew capsule, which is now expected to launch with astronauts for the first time in early 2021 on top of a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket.

Hurley described the ride on the Merlin Vacuum upper stage engine as “kind of like driving fast on a gravel road.”

“So little bit of vibration, not anything that was really unpleasant, but you certainly knew that there was powerful engine behind you,” he said. “And that took us all the way to orbit about six minutes later, and once again the Gs (built up), and how the engine throttled to control the Gs, and the engine cutoff.”

The G-force dropped off instantaneously as the Merlin Vacuum engine shut down, according to Hurley.

“We knew we made it to orbit.”

The Merlin Vacuum engine produces around 210,000 pounds of thrust at peak performance, while the three shuttle main engines combined to generate more than 1.4 million pounds of thrust once in space. But the space shuttle was much larger than the Crew Dragon spacecraft and the Falcon 9 upper stage, placing the astronauts farther away from the engines.

“It will be interesting to walk with the SpaceX folks to find out why it was a a little bit rougher ride on the second stage than it was for shuttle on those three main engines,” Hurley said.

SpaceX recorded audio, accelerations and other data on the Crew Dragon’s unpiloted test flight to the space station last year. Ground teams played the audio for Hurley and Behnken, giving the astronauts a preview of what they would experience during launch, re-entry and splashdown in the ocean.

“The biggest difference is just the dynamics that are involved, the vibration, the experiences that we felt actually riding a real rocket,” Behnken said. “Going through the fueling operation, that was a new experience for us. The space shuttle was fueled when the astronauts arrived (at the launch pad). Doug and I went through the fueling operation on-board Dragon, which was different for us. So hearing the venting and the valve sounds and the little vibrations associated with that operation was a new experience for us.”

During the 19-hour trip to the space station, Hurley tested the Crew Dragon’s manual control system two times, using the ship’s touchscreen displays to put in manual commands for the capsule’s maneuvering thrusters.

“Flying the Dragon was exactly how we expected it to be,” Hurley said.

SpaceX designed the Crew Dragon will to be fully autonomous, without requiring manual inputs from the astronauts on-board. But Dragon crews will have the ability to manually dock with the space station if necessary, and there are buttons to command a launch abort, initiate a deorbit and re-entry, and deploy parachutes if needed.

“If there are any system failures or other issues, we would like to know with confidence that if we take over manually, the vehicle will do what we need it to do,” Hurley said.

The Dragon’s automatic docking with the space station felt more gentle than expected, Hurley said.

“The thing that really stood out to both us — and we mentioned it was soon as we docked — is we didn’t feel the docking,” he said. “It was just so smooth, and then we were docked. In shuttle, you felt a little bit of a jolt, nothing real heavy, but you felt it.”

Hurley and Behnken also had positive reviews for their SpaceX-made pressure suits. The astronauts wore them during launch and docking, and will put them on again for their return to Earth — expected in late July or August.

“They’re custom designed and custom fitted, so they’re very comfortable,” Hurley said.

The astronauts said taking off the suits and putting them on in space, without the effect of gravity, was much easier than on Earth.

“We’d have to give the suits a five star rating,” Behnken said.

“Each suit is point designed for a very specific mission,” Behnken said. “This one is point designed for us to sit in our seats and protect us if there’s a fire or any sort of a problem with the atmosphere on-board Dragon, (if) it’s leaking out, or has smoke in it, or anything like that.

“These suits didn’t have to do that job for us, which was nice, but it was clear that they were ready.”

“For us — as the test pilots, so to speak — we’re there to evaluate how it does the mission, and so far it’s done just absolutely spectacularly,” Hurley said.

https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/06/12/a ... e-shuttle/



Conversion of solid fuel into thrust may be more uneven than liquid.

As regards to Musk, he may have some sociological hinderness combined with living in his own isolated bubble, that permits him to make somewhat outrageous statements and actions; however, he seems to realize fairly early on which projects have actual potential and jettisons the ones that have no cost benefit for him.

He probably realizes that cutting corners in the space race is asking for trouble, and I'll assume he's already figured out all the ones that fairly safely could be done so, hence the relatively cheap cost of his launches, and the advanced nature of his sponsored enterprise.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Thu Jul 16, 2020 9:22 pm

Spaceships: Engineering and Small Modular Reactors. Are they now unavoidable?

Nuclear Energy remains as contentious and controversial today as it has ever been. Fukushima nearly killed it off for good, but now there's a new crop of systems in development all over the world that may cause our policymakers to think again. They're called Small Modular Reactors. This week we consider the pros and cons of the technology.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yofGtxEgpI8



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Three hundred megawatts; or fifteen, for chibis.

Number one, in space, no one can hear you leak.

Number two, you can always jettison the reactor.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Fri Jul 17, 2020 9:31 pm

Inspiration: The Expanse's Worst (But Loveable) Battleship

Today we present the next episode in our series covering the ships of The Expanse. We're taking a look at the Agatha King, the flagship of the United Nations Navy's Jupiter Fleet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQQt4xzNl8U



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If it powers up, it powers through.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:56 pm

Inspiration: Star Wars Squadrons: HUGE NEW INFORMATION! (Astromechs, Cockpit Damage, Tie Details, and more)

Star Wars Squadrons just had a HUGE new news update with a ton of new information, including astromech droids, imperial ships, cockpit damage, and more!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f54XSayeu-4



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1. First thought, acceleration shunted to manoeuvre.

2. Power management becomes important during dogfighting, especially since the recharging cycle is over six minutes, not ten seconds.

3. Pretty sure it's fly by wire.

4. Repair drones.

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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Mon Jul 20, 2020 11:09 pm

Inspiration: SpaceX Starship Updates – Boca Chica Developing Faster & Faster!

In this Episode, we will take a look at SpaceX's accelerating efforts to turn the Boca Chica Starship facility into what's needed for the next level of prototyping. What will the Super Heavy launch mount look like? We'll also take a look at the last preparations for Starship SN5 and it's 150-meter hop hopefully next week.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4Uca0zm_CA



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1. Downport.

2. Bullet.

3. Please do not handle equipment.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Wed Jul 22, 2020 9:51 pm

Inspiration: The HORRORS of HYPERSPACE MADNESS explained | Star Wars Legends Lore

Today, we look at Star Wars legends and the terrifying phenomenon known as Hyperspace Madness, or Hyper-rapture, where people lose their minds after staring into the void of hyperspace. we'll cover all that and more on today's Star Wars Legends lore video!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxumU3ZdbRg



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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:10 pm

Spaceships: Short Haul and Intercontinental Passenger Flights, and I Flew On a (Semi) Private Jet. It Was...Disappointing.

I recently took a flight between Orange County and Oakland. And rather than fly a normal airline, I decided to give #JSX a shot. JSX is a semi-private airline that promotes a "private jet like experience at normal economy prices". Unfortunately, my experience wasn't quite as advertised. Let me explain...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2-1UkHd3ug



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1. Point to point.

2. Unlikely to be luxurious, unless actual private shuttle, since flight time will be comparatively extremely short.

3. Eighty nine starbux? Sounds about right.

4. Probably should be at least factor one manoeuvre drive, with or without afterburner; more to do with inertial compensation.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sat Jul 25, 2020 9:16 pm

Starships: Engineering, Jump Bubble, and The Torus & Toroidal Flow extract from Thrive 2011 documentary.avi

This is an extract from the documentary Thrive 2011 describing 'THE TORUS' and 'TOROIDAL FLOW....... Everybody watch and understand the significance of this Inc. free unlimited energy. all future technology for space travel including interstellar.

i include a link for the spherical arrangement of the ICHING symbols that i have used to theorize that the great 2012 experience is as we approach the singularity at the Toroidal center which in compasses our known universe. we are currently traveling through the vortex of The Torus, first link is a high resolution representation of the ICHING Hexagrams clearly arranged within a sphere in a Toroidal flow

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5i2NlruQec0



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Consider this the highlights; I was doing data recovery on one of my video libraries and came across the original.

It sort of fits in if you consider the jump drive radiates out from a central point.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Mon Jul 27, 2020 11:20 pm

Inspiration: Why Space Ships behave SO differently in the Star Wars Universe

Today we look at the physics of Star Wars, including the fact that space in the Star Wars Universe is not truly a vacuum! That and more on today's Star Wars Legends and Canon Lore video!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PwM7N0ozK4



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Etheric rudder - was a device for maneuvering starfighters. It allowed them to make sharp turns without the use of attitude thrusters. Etheric rudder prototypes were used on Recon-Xs.[2]


Jump rudder - make turns in the warp.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sat Aug 08, 2020 12:17 am

Spaceships: Subspace Woofers and TIE Pilots Test New Stereo System

Some TIE pilots decide to test their new stereo systems on a couple of unlucky travelers. And yes, that is Lucio flying them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEX5uB7f33I



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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sat Aug 08, 2020 10:23 pm

Starships: Engineering, Jump Drive Physics and Physics in 4 Dimensions…How?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkHL1GNU18M



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Jumping doesn't drop you down a rabbit hole, your starship just gains an extra dimension that both keeps you in the current Einsteinian universe but only interacts with gravitational forces.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Tue Aug 11, 2020 1:33 pm

Inspiration: Star Wars: The Malevolence is The Bismarck

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iB7d5BR7LNU



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The Malevolence was a Subjugator-class heavy cruiser.[2] It was 4,845 meters long[5] and possessed two twin ion cannons.[3] Once fired, the wave from the cannons would expand over great distances and disable any spacecraft upon impact. After the ion cannon had disabled an enemy warship, approximately 500 turbolasers mounted on the ship's enormous hull could fire upon the disabled vessel.[6][10] The vessel's power plant operated by recapturing waste heat and propulsion by-products. The design required a gigantic hull and was required to vent its stored energy on a regular basis, which was adopted to the ion cannons.[11] A panel of experts debated the warship's size on the HoloNet News, as many predicted how large the ship was.[9]

The massive ship was designed with an internal rail jet system, which served as a hovertrain that transported ammunition, supplies, and sometimes troops throughout the ship. Its cars looked similar to the Multi-Troop Transport.[12] Its computer systems were built with parts from KynachTech Industries.[13] Equipped with sixteen massive sublight engines,[3] the Malevolence also had a powerful hyperdrive, and at one point, its commander, the Confederate General Grievous, was told that the Malevolence was fast enough to outrun Republic forces.[3] The ship carried two tractor-beam batteries that could pull any freighter or small vessel aboard one of the Malevolence's docking bays.[7] Complementing the ship, Vulture-class droid fighters were on board to eradicate enemy fighters.[10] At least one Droch-class boarding ship, nicknamed a "pod hunter," was aboard the Malevolence, and was often deployed with rocket battle droids to seek and destroy jettisoned enemy escape pods.[3] The Malevolence also held General Grievous' personal starfighter.[7]


According to Dave Filoni, supervising director of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, the Malevolence and its story were based in part on the real-life German battleship Bismarck, which the British Royal Navy hunted relentlessly during World War II.[23] The finished version of the Malevolence was designed by Russell Chong and was based upon the GR-75 medium transport. Originally, the iconic train-like transport system in the center of the Malevolence was created so large that the Malevolence, to scale, could be flown inside its own train system.



I guess I should add some commentary.

It really depends as to what strategic goals you've set on; no one argues that the Royal Navy shouldn't have built the Hood, just that at a minimum it should have had a refit prior to the Great Patriotic War, and possibly the lessons of Jutland weren't properly applied.

Also, if they had the money and will, the follow ons would have been more impressive.

With the Yamatos, realization that the naval dynamic had switched from battleship to carrier should have been the incentive to use them more aggressively in the beginning.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Tue Aug 11, 2020 9:20 pm

Spaceships: Engineering and So Where Are We With Solid State Batteries? | Answers With Joe

We've been hearing a lot about the potential of solid state batteries over the last few years. But how close are we to the solid state revolution? And will it be a revolution at all?

Check out these videos for more on Solid State Batteries:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGmZ3Q0pC40



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Bonded superdense solid state batteries.

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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Fri Aug 14, 2020 8:22 pm

Inspiration: Flash Gordon • Theme Song • Queen

Soundtrack/theme song from the 1980 Mike Hodges film with Sam J. Jones, Melody Anderson, Topol, Ornella Muti, Timothy Dalton, Brian Blessed, Peter Wyngarde, Mariangela Melato & Max von Sydow.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYTYqs-ytSk


FLASH GORDON - Official Trailer - Cult Classic newly restored in 4K

Prepare to save the universe with the King of the Impossible! Alex Raymond's famous comic strip blasts to life in the timeless sci-fi cult adventure Flash Gordon! When energy waves pull the moon out of orbit, New York Jets quarterback Flash Gordon unwittingly finds himself heading for the planet Mongo, where - with assistance from beautiful Dale Arden - he'll take on Ming the Merciless and rescue humankind.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6uOHnxf85g


10 Thing You Didn't Know About Flash Gordon (1980)

GORDON'S ALIVE!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hu1bOFUtP5g



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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sat Aug 15, 2020 9:15 pm

Starships: The "FLEET KILLER" Prototype B-Wing Explained | Star Wars Ships

The A/SF-01 B-Wing would become one of the most powerful starfighter and bomber of the Galactic Civil War, but its predecessor was even more powerful, from a certain point of view. Learn the origins of the B-Wing, a break down of its stats, and how it became a Mon Calamari and Mandalorian creation. As well as how it compared to other Star Wars ships and starfighters like the X-Wing, Y-Wing and TIE Fighter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Xc08UIVX2Q



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It's hard to really compare Star Wars fighters with Traveller variants, especially since they can hyper, and it usually doesn't take a week.

However, I would put this into a category two hundred tonne hull.

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