Ship Design Philosophy

Discuss the Traveller RPG and its many settings
Condottiere
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:57 pm

Spaceships: Accommodations, Life Support and How Astronauts Make Oxygen in Space from Their Bodies

Sending 1 lb of cargo into space costs about $10,000! So how do space agencies afford to send supplies like oxygen, water, and food to their astronauts? Before they found a more efficient solution, they’d pack all the water into space with them in their rockets. The water took up a lot of room that could’ve otherwise been used for other supplies. That, and the added weight wasted fuel. So short answer: nope, it doesn’t go with the crew from the get-go.

That means they deliver it, right? That’d be too risky…and expensive! There’s no 100% guarantee that something bad won’t happen to the cargo ship at launch or on the way to the International Space Station. If the cargo doesn’t get to the station, then the next delivery will have to wait a very long time. That’s not an option since it’s dangerous for the astronauts. Ok, so let’s break it down item by item.

TIMESTAMPS:
Water 1:30
How the Water Treatment System works 2:20
Oxygen 3:15
Food 4:30
What do they do with their trash? 6:05
Where does space debris come from? 6:47
From the ISS to Mars! 7:38
Waste recycling 8:07

SUMMARY:
- The primary source of water for the crew is… the astronauts themselves! Whether it’s drops of sweat, condensation from breathing, or going to the toilet, all this water gets processed through complex filtering systems.
- Thanks to this complex system, it’s possible to produce a little over 4 lb of oxygen per day. That’s only enough for 2 people. The ISS crew usually consists of 6. To make up the difference, oxygen is delivered from Earth.
- What about the food? Here, the ISS is entirely dependent on supplies delivered from Earth. All those freeze-dried packets of astronaut food go along with the crew when they head to the station, or separate cargo is sent.
- According to NASA, astronauts dine on fruits, nuts, chicken, beef, seafood, candy, and even brownies! They also have coffee, tea, juices, and lemonade.
- In 2015, members of the 44th ISS crew ate lettuce that was fully grown on board! The seeds had been sent from Earth.
- Just like you and me, astronauts have garbage too. You’d think they could just chuck it out into the endless void of space, but that would be littering! Whenever they get a delivery, the cargo ship is docked to the station.
- Just like you and me, astronauts have garbage too. Whenever they get a delivery, the cargo ship is docked to the station. The astronauts get what they need from it, and then they load this ship with their trash.
- The cool thing about the International Space Station becoming more and more self-sufficient is that it’s almost like a trial for larger missions in the future.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZJ8EWJP0tE
Last edited by Condottiere on Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Condottiere
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Tue Jan 28, 2020 7:37 pm

Starships: Recovery Deck and How to Land on the Battlestar Galactica

Spacedock breaks down the landing system of the Jupiter Class Battlestar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OC03TssDqRk



【妄想3DCG】コスモファルコン着艦シークエンス

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyXptxpCaD8



Image

Carousel.
Condottiere
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Thu Jan 30, 2020 9:12 am

Starships: Confederation Cost Cutter Class

Ninety nine point five tonne technological level nine self sealing, unstreamlined, naturally armoured and gravitated light ferrous nickel planetoid [note one] hull with forty four point seven seven five hull points, costing 298'500 bux.

Two and a half tonne dual cockpit acts as primary bridge [note two] at fifteen kilobux, with free basic sensors, and a technological level seven factor five onboard computer at thirty kilobux; total 45 kilobux.

Software package includes a library, jump control one, and manoeuvre zero; total 100 kilobux

The option exists for three separate firmpoints, to which can be attached either a fixedly mounted virtual weapon system, or a technological level seven single turret [note three], at respectively one hundred kilobux and two hundred kilobux each; the default has a single mounted fixture, for but not with a [presumably] sandcaster weapon system; can be retrofitted, plus labour and yard time.

Nine factored one budgeted gravitic based energy inefficient manoeuvre drive modules, constructed at technological level nine; each module weighing one hundred kilogrammes and rated at a ten tonne thrust, costing 150 kilobux and requiring one point three power points; for a total weight of nine hundred kilogrammes, with a ninety tonne thrust performance requiring eleven point seven power points, at a cost of 1.35 megabux.

Combined with a modular nine pack anti-gravity factored one lifters [note four], constructed at technological level nine; each module weighing eighty kilogrammes and rated at a ten tonne lift, costing 160 kilobux and requiring one power point each; for a total weight of seven hundred twenty kilogrammes, with a ninety tonne lift performance requiring nine power points, at a costing of 1.44 megabux.

The power plant consists of four budgeted early fusion reactor modules, constructed at technological level eight; weighing in at one tonne each, costing 375 kilobux, and producing eight power points per round [note five]; for a total weight of three tonnes, with an output of thirty two power points, and costing 1.5 megabux.

The power plant is connected to a half a tonne of solar panelling [note six], whose output can either be shunted to the power plant, and/or the onboard [high efficiency] batteries, costing 50 kilobux.

One factored one budgeted increased size jump drive, constructed at technological level nine rated at two hundred parsec tonnes; totaling ten point five five tonnes costing 9.675 megabux [note seven].

You can tow along an interplanetary cargo net with a default volume of fourteen hundred cubic metres [note eight], available at technological level eight, costing 100 kilobux, which would basically half the engineering performance if completely full.

Jump bubble diameter is 223.737 metres, based on a fourteen hundred cubic metre volume.

For landing gear, half a tonne ferrous nickel lump is divided into three equal cones, distributed equally around the base of the sphere and welded to it, acting as a de facto landing tripod. If that's not an option, adding a half tonne hump anywhere on the hull would create enough ballast. Or attaching it to a rope and trailing it along.

There are four fuel tanks, the first two specifically meant to feed the power plant, are one tonne each. The other two, are hybrid cargo fuel containers, sized at ten and a half tonnes for a net total volume of ten tonnes each, costing a premium of 50 kilobux each.

One tonne fuel processor, capable of processing twenty tonnes per day, costing 50 kilobux.

There are two ingresses, the freebie [note nine] two tonne airlock, and a cargo hatch [note ten].

One tonne allocated for the ship's locker.

Accommodations are a ten tonne stable, with suitable light partitions to separate the added in bunks, and fixtures such as a seat toilet toilet, wash basin, and shower attached to the plumbing, sufficient for twenty human sized [note eleven] crew, costing 25 kilobux; with a self contained life support system that costs a net 2.5 kilobux per month [note twelve].

Cargo can be squeezed into the remaining 22.93 tonnes.

Total cost is 14.6835 megabux [note thirteen].

Adjusted costs due to discounts include ten percent (13.21515 megabux} for a standard ship design, and twenty percent for low automation (10.57212 megabux) [note fourteen]

Maintenance 28.964712328767123287671232876712 bux per day; well, 29.97 bux.

Power budget would be nineteen point nine points for basic ship systems [note fifteen], eleven point seven points for the manoeuvre drive, nine points for the gravitational lifters, and ten points for the monojump drive.

Crew requirement is for a pilot[/astrogator] and engineer[/copilot]; though presumably, one pilot would be sufficient, though would be operating at minus one shipboard task dice modifier checks after one week.


Notes:

one hollowed out equally (if you didn't just pour liquid nickel iron in a mold], and laser polished to a spherical shaped brilliant billiard ball.

two though it's unclear if two pilots would be mandatory; in any event, being a cockpit, it can be sealed off from the rest of the vessel, with a default life support for the two crewmembers for twenty four hours.

three at a nominal 200 kilobux per turret; upto three different weapon systems can be attached without additional cost; in theory, if firmpointed turrets are limited to single weapon systems, they don't require so much volume, nor cost as much.

four two disadvantages [orbital range] plus two technological advantages [size reduction, size reduction] cancel each other out and translate into eighty percent size reduction; combined, this ensures that the cutrater can leave any planetary object with a gravitational pull of less than one ppoint eight standard gravities; technological level limitations still apply at a hard factor one per, two if combined while within one and a quarter megametres from the surface, and possibly 0.909 gees further afield, if you think the additional nine energy points expenditure is worth it.

five budgeted increased size; regardless how you crunch the numbers, there's no cheaper technological level nine alternative.

six power plantless hulls have solar panels calculated on basic systems and thrust factor one energy requirements, which is basically thirty power points per hundred tonnes, so at technological level eight based early fusion reactors, that would three hundred kilogrammes, short of the minimum five hundred kilogrammes minimum.

seven five tonne increased size overhead costing 843.75 kilobux requiring one power point per ten parsec tonnes, five tonne increased size core costing 843.75 kilobux, five hundred fifty kilogrammes increased size capacitors costing 1.2375 megabux; totaling ten point five five tonnes costing 9.675 megabux.

eight it has a default diameter of thirteen point eight eight metres, so it's well within the jump bubble, so it gets dragged down the rabbit hole, despite High Guard saying that a ship cannot perform a jump while this net is deployed, as no discernible difference is mentioned between it and the jump net, and the characteristics of the jump net is a legacy of a pre bubble time.

nine seems inconsistently applied in Traveller, so the additional two tonnes and 100 kilobux is accounted for as you couldn't make it part of the overhead of any other ship component.

ten should be large enough for whatever expected cargo sized pallets or containers are the norm.

eleven you could subdivide it into three three tonne staterooms, with a shared one tonne fresher; panelling, fittings and furnishings are calculated separately.

twelve that's about one person per square.

thirteen not accounting for additional fittings and furnishings, nor the ten percent discount for mass production.

fourteen Traveller Companion: in this case, a holistic approach, rather than nitpicking; also, there's no way the crew intensive variant is feasible.

fifteen minimum 9.75 points with full thrust zero point nine gee 11.7 points equals 21.45 points; takeoff power requirement would be 30.45 points.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Thu Jan 30, 2020 9:30 am

Spaceships: Engineering, Waste Heat, and Boffins find metal conductor which does not heat

by NICK FARRELL on03 DECEMBER 2019

Breaks the Wiedemann-Franz Law

Boffins at Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division have found a metal which can conduct electricity without conducting heat - an incredibly useful property that defies our current understanding of how conductors work.

The metal, found in 2017, contradicts something called the Wiedemann-Franz Law, which basically states that good conductors of electricity will also be proportionally good conductors of heat, which is why things like motors and appliances get so hot when you use them regularly.

However, the Berkeley team found that metallic vanadium dioxide (VO2) does not do that. VO2 also has the strange ability to switch from a see-through insulator to a conductive metal at the temperature of 67 degrees Celsius (152 degrees Fahrenheit).

The boffins were astounded at the VO2's ability to play fast and footloose with the Wiedemann-Franz Law.

Junqiao Wu from Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division said it was a totally unexpected finding.

"It shows a drastic breakdown of a textbook law that has been known to be robust for conventional conductors. This discovery is of fundamental importance for understanding the basic electronic behaviour of novel conductors." Not only does this unexpected property change what we know about conductors, but it could also be incredibly useful - the metal could one day be used to convert wasted heat from engines and appliances back into electricity, or even create better window coverings that keep buildings cool", Wu said,

https://www.fudzilla.com/news/49895-bof ... s-not-heat



But there are several other very important differences
Between human beings and animals that you should know about

(I'd appreciate your input)

Sweat baby, sweat baby ...

... only God knows where we stuck it
Hieroglyphics, let me be Pacific: I wanna be down in your South Seas
But I got this notion that the motion of your ocean means "Small Craft Advisory"
Condottiere
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Fri Jan 31, 2020 8:07 pm

Starships: Accommodations and the Economics of Interstellar Travelling

Now that I think I've designed the cheapest viable starship in Traveller, with the exception of when a tonne jump drive and jump torpedoes were canon, it's time to consider the primary obstacle to interstellar travel for the masses, cost of passage.

For emigrants, legal or otherwise, the formula would be a question of available resources and desperation.

For tourists, it would be the percentage of their annual wage, and since it tends to be group orientated, whether nuclear family or significant other, for multiple berths inclusive provision for the return leg.

We have to find the equilibrium price that an average interstellar tourister is willing to pay for two berths, and how how low can a shipping company sell these tickets, while still getting a net profit.

I rather doubt that anyone in the Traveller universe willingly takes the low berth option, and parents would certainly be leery of it for their offspring.

That leaves basic passage, which really is dependent upon how much discomfort you're willing to endure for the next fortnight.

When I fly, price of the ticket and reliability of the airline tend to be paramount, though I only have to tolerate it for less than twenty four hours, from the time I get up, till the time I drop into the next bed at my destination (assuming I'm not still pumped with adrenaline).

The Core book mentions basic passage is twenty two hundred bux for one parsec with four travellers stuffed into one four tonne stateroom or two tonnes per passenger if none are available, and besides overhead, you still have to pay stateroom and per capita life support costs fifteen hundred bux per basic passage.

Not accounting for overhead, fuel, taxation and labour, that's a gross profit of seven hundred bux.

There's of course the transatlantic slaver method, which I suspect most people would assume overcrowding the onboard stables, but I suspect it's more likely utilizing emergency low berths which take up one tonne, operate at hundred bux per month and have room for four; you can keep them on ice indefinitely, and very little supervision.

If travellers opt for the default low berth option, operators make a gross profit of six hundred bux.

So now you have established that starship operators expect a gross profit of six to seven hundred bux per economy class passenger.
Last edited by Condottiere on Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Condottiere
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sat Feb 01, 2020 5:57 am

Starships: Accommodations and the Economics of Interstellar Travelling

A rule of thumb would be one attendant and one toilet per fifty passengers; however, since it's a hundred sixty eight hour tour, you probably need three shifts and three toilets, though the ratio is higher in premium.

That brings up the fact that even if you manage to design a cheap starliner, it's labour that will be the biggest cost component, since I'm not sure how you can negotiate a lower rate, and not worry that this will result in lacklustre service, negligence and poor maintenance.

The two thousand bux salary of the steward does provide us a basis for calculating the middle middle class income in the Imperium, which depending on calendar or lunar months, would be twenty four to twenty six kilobux per annum, as a typical flight attendant's salary is probably fifty thousand.

A double income two kids family probably wouldn't spend more than half a year's income on a once in a decade experience, so the target would be seven hundred fifty bux per berth.
Last edited by Condottiere on Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Condottiere
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sat Feb 01, 2020 6:12 am

Spacestations: Accommodations and Life on board an O'neill Cylinder

O'Neill Cylinders space stations are examples of large rotating habitats able to be constructed in space in which people and even a complex ecology might be transplanted. But what would it be like living in one and how would civilizations based inside them in the future tend to operate?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYyg8JC-6ew


Tax shelter.

Or swampland.

Migratory nomads.

Jupiter Two.

Maybe Snowpiercer.
Last edited by Condottiere on Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Old School » Sat Feb 01, 2020 3:02 pm

I rather doubt anyone in the Traveller universe willingly takes the low berth option, and parents would certainly be leery of it for their offspring.
As I see the Traveller universe, the risks of low berth are minimal. Otherwise tramp traders wouldn’t be equipped with 20 low Berths.

Assuming its a normal (8+) Medic check, this role should not be failed under normal circumstances for a passenger vessel. In any civilized society, it would likely be criminal for anyone other than a full Doctor (Combined +4 between skill and education) to take paying passengers out of low berth under normal circumstances. These doctors are more likely to be based at the starport than on ship, expect for large passenger or military vessels. Add in +2 for taking it slow, and +1 for TL12 or higher, and you have a minimum roll of 1. Even with a -1 for low END of the passenger, such as an overweight and out of shape tourist, this roll can’t be failed.

Only in emergency situations, or far from civilization, or with the very weak, is there a risk. Passenger ship operators would likely refuse passage to someone who was too weak to travel safely (-2 END modifier), and few tourists would travel in a TL11 ship to a backwater where they must rely on the the Ships steward with Medic 1 to revive them.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sat Feb 01, 2020 4:35 pm

That would depend if a roll is mandatory, in which case snake eyes is always a problem.

This would be where a saving throw comes in.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sat Feb 01, 2020 4:37 pm

Inspiration: THE EXPANSE is the Most Scientifically Accurate TV Show

Right now, there’s only one great sci-fi show on television that’s more science than fiction, and I got on a dang spaceship just so I could tell you why, and why that’s so important.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgvI6RbkMnQ
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sat Feb 01, 2020 4:48 pm

Starships: Accommodations and the Economics of Interstellar Travelling

I just noticed that an administrator gets only paid one and a half kilobux, and a mechanic one kilobux.

That would make an administrator actually a clerical worker, probably an upper lower class wage slave, and a mechanic a middle lower class worker bee.

Of course, while living onboard ship, board and lodging should be inclusive in the wage packet.

Assuming the real life poverty line is below twelve kilobux per annum, starvation wages in Traveller might be five hundred bux per month, in an industrialized community.
Last edited by Condottiere on Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Old School
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Old School » Sat Feb 01, 2020 5:28 pm

Condottiere wrote:
Sat Feb 01, 2020 4:35 pm
That would depend if a roll is mandatory, in which case snake eyes is always a problem.

This would be where a saving throw comes in.
If Mongoose rules include automatic failure on a skill check with a natural 2, I haven’t seen it.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:14 pm

Inspiration: Adam Savage Examines the Props and Spacesuits of The Expanse!

Adam visits the props department of Syfy's The Expanse, where armorists and propmakers engineer the weapons, helmets, and the gear that give weight and story to the universe of the show. Prop master James Murray shows Adam some of the unique props his team has made, revealing aesthetic and functional details!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXwe51lkJ6M



Adam Savage Speaks to an Expanse Graphic Designer!

Viewers of The Expanse know well the Savage Industries storyline, introduced in season 3. While on set, Adam Savage talks with Kim Sison, first assistant graphic designer, who not only designed the show's iteration of his company's logo, but many of the signs, labels, patches and brands you see as well!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Kpj8mJGIls


Mission patches.

Intergalactic Waffles.


Adam Savage Talks Costumes on the Expanse Set!

The Expanse takes its characters outdoors in season 4. Adam Savage speaks to costume designer Joanne Hansen about the modifications she and her team made not only to accommodate story, but also the actual harsh conditions the actors faced while filming. Plus, a spotlight on Chrisjen Avasarala's AMAZING clothes!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gg-5_4ZOEcw



Adam Savage Meets the Expanse's Stunt Coordinator!

How do you make dangerous scenes safe, especially where zero gravity is involved? Adam Savage chats with stunt coordinator Matt Birman, who has worked on the Expanse since day one, about the challenges of balancing story, location, safety and expense.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TkEPnim798


Zero gee sutra.
Condottiere
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:53 pm

Image

Starships: Accommodations and the Economics of Interstellar Travelling

Or accommodating the economics of interstellar travelling.

The nominal "average" value at Earth's surface, known as standard gravity is, by definition, 9.80665 m/s2. This quantity is denoted variously as gn, ge (though this sometimes means the normal equatorial value on Earth, 9.78033 m/s2), g0, gee, or simply g (which is also used for the variable local value).

The formula for escape velocity comprises of a constant, G, which we refer to as the universal gravitational constant. The value of it is = 6.673 × 10-11 N . m2 / kg2. The unit for escape velocity is meters per second (m/s).

Near the surface of the Earth (sea level), gravity decreases with height such that linear extrapolation would give zero gravity at a height of one half of the Earth's radius - (9.8 m. s−2 per 3,200 km.)

The escape velocity from Earth is about 11.186 km/s (6.951 mi/s; 40,270 km/h; 36,700 ft/s; 25,020 mph; 21,744 kn)[1] at the surface.

In 1856 Andrew Waugh announced Everest (then known as Peak XV) as 8,840 m (29,002 ft) high, after several years of calculations based on observations made by the Great Trigonometric Survey. The 8,848 m (29,029 ft) height given is officially recognised by Nepal and China.

Escape velocity depends on G not g, so increase or decrease in Earth's gravitational pull doesn't matter. Hence, a launch from Mt. Everest will need less that 11.2 km/s as its increasing the radius by roughly 8 km. Now given the huge mass of earth, the change is negligible.

Problem 2 – An Engineer proposes to launch a rocket from the top of Mt Everest (altitude 8.9 km) because its summit is farther from the center of Earth. Is this a good plan? Answer: V = 894/(6378+8.9)1/2 = 11.18 km/s. This does not change the required escape speed by very much considering the effort to build such a launch facility at this location.



And I'm told that Everest is about as high as a mountain can aspire too, at standard gravity, so it doesn't seem much point in going out of your way to build a spaceport there, in order to take advantage of any gravitational differences between sea level and nine thousand metres altitude.
Condottiere
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Sun Feb 02, 2020 6:34 pm

Starships: Accommodations and the Economics of Interstellar Travelling

Or accommodating the economics of interstellar travelling.

From a rotating body[edit]
The escape velocity relative to the surface of a rotating body depends on direction in which the escaping body travels. For example, as the Earth's rotational velocity is 465 m/s at the equator, a rocket launched tangentially from the Earth's equator to the east requires an initial velocity of about 10.735 km/s relative to Earth to escape whereas a rocket launched tangentially from the Earth's equator to the west requires an initial velocity of about 11.665 km/s relative to Earth. The surface velocity decreases with the cosine of the geographic latitude, so space launch facilities are often located as close to the equator as feasible, e.g. the American Cape Canaveral (latitude 28°28' N) and the French Guiana Space Centre (latitude 5°14' N).

Practical considerations[edit]
In most situations it is impractical to achieve escape velocity almost instantly, because of the acceleration implied, and also because if there is an atmosphere, the hypersonic speeds involved (on Earth a speed of 11.2 km/s, or 40,320 km/h) would cause most objects to burn up due to aerodynamic heating or be torn apart by atmospheric drag. For an actual escape orbit, a spacecraft will accelerate steadily out of the atmosphere until it reaches the escape velocity appropriate for its altitude (which will be less than on the surface). In many cases, the spacecraft may be first placed in a parking orbit (e.g. a low Earth orbit at 160–2,000 km) and then accelerated to the escape velocity at that altitude, which will be slightly lower (about 11.0 km/s at a low Earth orbit of 200 km). The required additional change in speed, however, is far less because the spacecraft already has significant orbital velocity (in low Earth orbit speed is approximately 7.8 km/s, or 28,080 km/h).


10.735/9.78033 = 1.0976112257970845564515716749844

So basically, taking off from the Equator to the east requires about 1.1 gravities at default.

That would mean you could have a manoeuvre drive factor one, plus a rocket booster factor zero point one, and achieve orbit.

11.665/9.78033 = 1.1927000418186298417333566454302

Or a factor zero point two rocket booster, and take off anywhere in any direction.
Condottiere
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Wed Feb 05, 2020 1:24 pm

Inspiration: Sci-Fi UI Episode 1: The Expanse

In this episode of Sci-Fi UI, we'll find out whether the computer interfaces in The Expanse can actually be built in the real world. In Sci-Fi UI, we deep-dive into the UI of tomorrow to see if we can learn anything about building better UI today.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7WtNgesVbQ


The Expanse Costume Design: Part 1

While prepping for season 5 from their production wardrobe in Toronto, we explore the Expanse costume design with a complete walk through with series costume designer Joanne Hansen.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWo3mDrEe3o


The Expanse Costume Design: Part 2

The Expanse Costume Design: In this 2nd video of a 3 part series, we interview Joanne Hansen, the costume designer of The Expanse series on Amazon Prime, from the production wardrobe department in Toronto, Canada.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3s5TtooOXRc



I'm pretty sure that some hand gestures are universal and eternal.
Condottiere
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:03 am

Inspiration: Starships size comparison

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_Loc7qX7FI


STAR WARS Size Comparison

Comparison of many things from the Star Wars movies. Only movies from episode I to VIII, Rogue One and Solo. Obviously not everything appears, only the most representative.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHo_J5FtJ58


Starships size comparison (Star Wars)

Not all the ships of Star Wars. Only the most important.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnxd3t6iUiM


Starships Size Comparison (Battlestar Galactica)

Comparison of sizes of some ships of the series Battlestar Galactica

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WBu2Esno2s


Spaceships in the Sky

So the ships of science fiction would look in heaven.
Madrid (Spain)

--Names of Starships--

1-Death Star 2 (Star Wars)
2-Viajero (Destiny)
3-District 9
4-Tet (Oblivion)
5-Independence Day Mothership
6-Mimbari (Babylon 5)
7-Unicron (Transformers)
8-Leviathan (Starcraft)
9-Destroyer (Star Wars)
10-Citadel (Mass Effect)
11-High Charity (Halo)
12-StarKiller
13-Halo
14-Space station (2001: A Space Odyssey)
15-Borg Cube (Star Trek)
16-Enterprise (Star Trek)
17-Elysium Station
18-Ark (Halo)
19-Avatar (Eve online)
20-Reaper (Mass Effect)
21-Axion (Wall-E)
22-Ra Pyramid (StarGate)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaJt1SDHPW4



Baby Yoda is missing.

Never heard of the battlestar Prometheus.

In theory, the Lucrehulk-class droid control ship/Core ship are arguably breakaway hulls.
Condottiere
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Fri Feb 07, 2020 10:34 pm

Starships: Confederation Cutter Classes

Coming attractions:

Cold Cutter Class - Refrigerated cargo and passengers.

Cutlass Class - Medium fighter

Cal Cutter Class - with bomb bays; fighter bomber

Stone Cutter Class - constructed from available pkanetoids

Air Cutter Class - Streamlined

Cuttlefish Cutter Class - Pressurized hull

Char Cutter Class - Food truck

Crew Cutter Class - Automated

Buzz Cutter Class - Interceptor

Miss Cutter Class - stealthed

Pre Cutter Class - prototype

Clear Cutter Class - reconnaissance

Short Cutter Class - short haul

Cutback Cutter Class - low cost

Cutthroat Cutter Class - corsair

Cutpurse Cutter Class - blockade runner
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby Condottiere » Fri Feb 07, 2020 11:09 pm

Inspiration : Star Wars Resistance season two

Image

Inspiring might be an exaggeration.

There are probably any number of interrelated reasons that Disney cut the cord early on this series, and it shows in the more compressed story lines; to be fair, I suspect that by the end of the first season, the Mouse had a very good prognostication as to the direction of the franchise by first quarter twenty twenty, which probably included burying everything in the period just prior to the fall of the New Republic, for the next couple of decades.

The second season is an improvement of the first, with the slapstick antics of the protagonist kept to a minimum, and a glimpse of the possible character arcs and development that supporting characters might have had. The cameos could have been dispensed with, but that might just be my personal bias; probably needed Vader and Ahsoka, though I believe she's dead by now, however prepubescent Yoda should be available.

I'm not quite sure Disney knew what they wanted with this series, except as a tie in for younger viewers to the Sequels; Filoni probably was distracted by The Mandolarian, and may not have cared in any case.

You're not missing anything by not watching it.

Technically speaking, the spacecraft combat wasn't bad.
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Re: Ship Design Philosophy

Postby locarno24 » Mon Feb 10, 2020 8:18 am

There are probably any number of interrelated reasons that Disney cut the cord early on this series, and it shows in the more compressed story lines; to be fair, I suspect that by the end of the first season, the Mouse had a very good prognostication as to the direction of the franchise by first quarter twenty twenty, which probably included burying everything in the period just prior to the fall of the New Republic, for the next couple of decades.
It was intended to be as short as it was - compared to Rebels, etc - because the intent was to have it basically tie in with the 'end' of the saga and the hesitation to include anything 'after' that point.

It does feel wierdly compressed and stretched at different points - there are quite a few 'filler' episodes in season 2 - but overall I enjoyed it.
I agree the space combat is quite good - the fighter design is pretty good, with the T-70, TIE/ba and TIE/ad (the dive-bombers) recognisably faction-specific ships but looking different 'enough' to be interesting.

We don't really know where Ahsoka is. She'd be in her early 70s at the time of Rise of Skywalker, which is an eminantly achievable age, especially for a force-sensitive. I wouldn't have been too surprised to see her - for that matter I wondered if the Hutt we see in season two might have been an all-grown-up "Stinky" from the pilot episode of Clone Wars.

I didn't mind the cameos of Poe and Leia. My main 'like' for the series was showing the universe pre-Force Awakens; something the first film kind of failed to do, and helping to underline the cold war feel and the "Resistance=/=Republic because Leia's a social pariah" political setup which isn't really explained in the trilogy itself.
Understand that I'm not advocating violence.
I'm just saying that it's highly effective and I strongly recommend using it.

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