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Keeping Time

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 1:52 am
by rgrove0172
Do we assume that the standard Earth calendar is used throughout known space? Do ships in space use this calendar? What about local calendars on colony worlds? Their days are different, years different etc. Do they use a local clock or do they conform to the standard?

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 2:09 am
by F33D
Depends on how you set up YTU

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 2:45 am
by Jeraa
While individual worlds may have their own calendar, I believe the official Imperial Calender consists of 13 months of 28 days each, with a day not in any month (for a total of 365 days.), with 24 hours in the day. I think it was kept as a holdover from the days of the 2nd Imperium (which was controlled by the Solomani, so would of used the Earth calendar.)

Other races use their own dating system. Aslan days are 36 Earth hours long, and the Aslan year consists of 320 Earth days (which is 212.2 Aslan days). There is no standard Vargr calender - each planet, government, or pack may have its own way of tracking time. Zhodani days are 27.02 Earth hours long, with years 275.2 Earth days in length (which is 244.44 Zhodani days).

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 2:49 am
by Lord High Munchkin
I think 2300AD is the setting... I tend to use "Earth Standard". Locally time might be measured in local days, but computers are sophisticated enough that they can easily handle switching from one system to the other.

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 5:17 am
by Colin
The standard calendar is kept. There is even one for the year 2300 in the back of the book. Most colonies structure their day around the local day, but use standard hours, minutes and seconds. Of course, comps and links will track both the standard earth calendar, and the local calendar. Things like ages and anniversaries are based on the standard calendar rather than local time.

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 7:34 pm
by CosmicGamer
I don't recall any reference in the CRB. Spinward Marches has this on the subject:
The system uses a seven–day week (named Oneday, Twoday and
so forth) and a 365–day year. Dates within the year are given as
Day–Year. For example, 054–1105 is the 54th day of the 1105th year
since the founding of the Third Imperium.
LBB9 is similiar. The library data indicates Teran and Vilani use months but also say things like "fallen into disuse" and "little used outside of...". But for 2300 I'd think the Terran calendar would still be the standard.

While months are used quite often by the authors to describe a length of time, I'm not sure where they are defined.

There is so much material out there.
Jeraa wrote:While individual worlds may have their own calendar, I believe the official Imperial Calender consists of 13 months of 28 days each, with a day not in any month (for a total of 365 days.), with 24 hours in the day.
Can you please provide the source for 13 months of 28 days?

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 7:57 pm
by Jeraa
CosmicGamer wrote:
Jeraa wrote:While individual worlds may have their own calendar, I believe the official Imperial Calender consists of 13 months of 28 days each, with a day not in any month (for a total of 365 days.), with 24 hours in the day.
Can you please provide the source for 13 months of 28 days?
Classic Traveller, Supplement 8 - Library Data (A-M), page 22 (Dating Systems).
Imperial dates count from the year of the founding of the Third Imperium, specifying the year zero as a holiday year. Dates before that are negative, dates after that are positive, with the sign usually suppressed. Imperial dating uses a Julian system for specifying days. Each day in the year is consecutively numbered beginning with 001. Thus, in the year 1105, the first day of the year is 001-1105. Weeks of seven days and months of 28 days are used to refer to lengths of time, but rarely to establish dates.

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 9:50 pm
by rgrove0172
hmm, Im sold on both the use of the standard calendar and day for 2300 and some sort of numerical Universal Time established during by an accord or something at some point in the history. (International Accord on Space Standards - Amsterdam Sept. 8, 2149 or something similar)

An impromptitude example

Year-Month (1-12) day (1-31) hour (1-24) minute (1-60) second (1-60)

2303-06241856.32 = 2303AD June 24th, 6:56pm 32 seconds

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 11:32 pm
by Lord High Munchkin
rgrove0172 wrote:An impromptitude example

Year-Month (1-12) day (1-31) hour (1-24) minute (1-60) second (1-60)

2303-06241856.32 = 2303AD June 24th, 6:56pm 32 seconds
Surely, that would be (following international date standards):

2303-24061856.32 = 2303CE 24th June, 6:56pm 32 seconds?

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 11:43 pm
by rgrove0172
I suppose but I kind of like each smaller period clicking off toward the changing of the next higher.. such that days click up to 30 (28, 31 whatever) then change the month value. A more linear progression I suppose.

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 11:55 pm
by Lord High Munchkin
I just think that in the '2300AD' setting it's unlikely that the US dating convention would be used outside their own political areas. The French would likely impose a more standard usage.

I suppose the game is called "2300AD" largely due to GDW having been American, and the fact that it's nearly 30 years old, but it's odd for the same reason.

Hey ho.

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 1:29 am
by Lemnoc
I imagine there is a general universal clock and calendar for scientific purposes, possibly tied to pulsar spin down and Planck time. Then the worlds each have their own unique clocks and calendar tied to their local cosmos. Tidelocked worlds, deep space stations, etc., would use the Terran 24-hour clock, I imagine, since humans evolved around that, probably set to UTC/GMT. At least some of the French Empire (in particular Libreville) is at UTC 0, so the French would probably be OK with that.

EDIT: Whoops, checked. Libreville is at Paris time.

Re: Keeping Time

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:15 am
by locarno24
Do they use a local clock or do they conform to the standard?
For a place with no discernable day/night (tidelocked world, deep space station, ship), then 24 hr 'days' seem sensible.

For others, I've always been partial to the Honorverse solution - split up the day into X 60-minute hours plus one >60-minute hour as 'compensate' just after midnight.