Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Discuss the Traveller RPG and its many settings
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Mon Nov 30, 2020 10:01 pm

Asteroid Impact: What Are Our Chances?

Stephen Hawking thought an asteroid impact posed the greatest threat to life on Earth. Thanks to Kiwico for sponsoring this video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Wrc4fH ... Veritasium



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1. Black swans: it's the ones you can't predict or see.

2. Plasmaed rock.

3. Bad news: nuclear explosion equivalent; good news: no radioactive fallout.

4. Instant barbecue, rare rather than medium.

5. Regenerative rock.

6. Persuasive nudge, rather than use a hammer.

7. On the bright side, we're likely to die of other causes.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Dec 01, 2020 10:13 pm

AI-brewed beer? NEC concocts a style for your generation
Millennial brew is sour and bitter while 50-somethings offered strong drink

NIKI MIZUGUCHI, Nikkei staff writer
July 16, 2020 04:28 JST
TOKYO -- Japanese IT services group NEC and its partner microbrewery have devised a series of alcoholic beverages using a mix of artificial intelligence and pop culture that they say is sure to be the choice of any generation.

Although it will ultimately be up to consumers whether the drink hits the spot, NEC said Wednesday its new line of beer describes trends that people in their 20s, 30s, 40s and 50s have experienced in each decade of their lives.

Using its AI, the company analyzed images of fashion magazines from publisher Shogakukan to identify colors that were trendy when each generation was in their 20s. AI also looked at words and texts in other Shogakukan magazines for different 10-year periods for each age group and assigned numerical values in aroma descriptors such as "fruity" and "caramel."

Images of fashion trends were also linked to taste descriptors, including "dryness" and "sweetness."

NEC serves a dark red brew with higher alcohol content for 50-somethings, who enjoyed Japan's go-go years in the 1980s when they were young. Millennials in their 30s, said to have distinct values different from older generations, get a greenish-blue drink with some sourness and bitterness.

A yellow beer was developed for those in their 40s and a pink brew for 20-somethings. The canned beverages were brewed by Kyodoshoji, the company that operates Coedo Brewery. A pack of four cans, one for each generation, retails for 1,400 yen ($13).

NEC has cooked up food items using AI twice before. Coffee beans based on renowned Japanese novels were offered in 2017, and chocolate bars depicting the mood of specific years or time were developed in 2018.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Food-B ... generation



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Condottiere
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Dec 03, 2020 9:10 am

🧊 World MINERAL commodities PRODUCTION in real scale (annual)

👋Hello everyone, today I bring a video to know the world production estimates of different minerals commodities per year (2018). Knowing the weight and density of each one, we can calculate the volume and see the space it actually occupies. I hope you enjoy!

🎵Music: Nothing On Me - Patrick Patrikios

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALgXflL ... allStudios



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1. Gas, naturally.

2. That's a lot of compressed dinosaurs.

3. At some point, I wonder when water mining becomes a recorded statistic.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Dec 04, 2020 8:11 pm

Royal Navy Cutlass Bayonet

In the middle of the 19th century, Britain's Royal Navy decided that they needed to combine bayonets and cutlasses. The results are interesting!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXUJBuBYvZo



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German quality.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sat Dec 05, 2020 7:37 pm

Does Anything Eat Viruses? Turns Out These Organisms Do

Hello and welcome! My name is Anton and in this video, we will talk about a discovery of strange organisms that seem to be the first type of life that eat viruses.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmacM7v ... ntonPetrov



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Dark matter - what eats viruses?
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Dec 08, 2020 12:16 am

The Curious Case of the Widespread Radioactive Apartments

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzmV84U ... yIFoundOut



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Preventive medication.

Probably could do with a booster shot.

Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Dec 08, 2020 10:26 pm

The Pull of Half Life - Guns & Gravity - Extra Credits

The last of our mini series of science in video games, we turn to one of the classics with full life consequences. One of the most ingenious & famous guns of Half Life is the gravity gun, a weapon that doesn't fire bullets but makes it so you can pull items to Gordon Freeman, or launch them into the stratosphere. But... how would that actually work on a science level? Dr. Erin Macdonald helps break down the science with gravitons, quantum gravitational fields and words that feel more comfortable in a scifi novel than actual science.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6cWfgJ3 ... traCredits



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Tractor/Repulsor Gun, Man Portable?
Condottiere
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Dec 10, 2020 4:54 pm

The Altyn Helmet (Armored Spetsnaz Soldiers)

During the 1980’s in the Soviet-Afghan War, Soviet Spetsnaz units were subjected to modernization of their protective equipment, primarily the headgear.
The Standard army issued steel helmets provided insufficient protection.

Instead, Spetsnaz opted for titanium helmets.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDiHg6H ... pleHistory



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For when you know the opposition likes to take headshots.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sat Dec 12, 2020 12:50 am

THE PETRIFIED RIVER URANIUM MINING IN THE WESTERN USA 75674

Made in 1957 by Union Carbide & Carbon company, PETRIFIED RIVER describes the modern romance of the present-day West in the search for uranium. It shows modern uranium prospecting, including prospecting by airplane, as well as mining in the Colorado Plateau. It also discusses the uses of radioactive isotopes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Uranium is a chemical element with symbol U and atomic number 92. It is a silvery-white metal in the actinide series of the periodic table. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium is weakly radioactive because all its isotopes are unstable (with half-lives of the 6 naturally known isotopes, uranium-233 to uranium-238, varying between 69 years and 4.5 billion years). The most common isotopes of uranium are uranium-238 (which has 146 neutrons and accounts for almost 99.3% of the uranium found in nature) and uranium-235 (which has 143 neutrons, accounting for 0.7% of the element found naturally). Uranium has the second highest atomic weight of the primordially occurring elements, lighter only than plutonium. Its density is about 70% higher than that of lead, but slightly lower than that of gold or tungsten. It occurs naturally in low concentrations of a few parts per million in soil, rock and water, and is commercially extracted from uranium-bearing minerals such as uraninite.

In nature, uranium is found as uranium-238 (99.2739–99.2752%), uranium-235 (0.7198–0.7202%), and a very small amount of uranium-234 (0.0050–0.0059%). Uranium decays slowly by emitting an alpha particle. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.47 billion years and that of uranium-235 is 704 million years,making them useful in dating the age of the Earth.

Many contemporary uses of uranium exploit its unique nuclear properties. Uranium-235 has the distinction of being the only naturally occurring fissile isotope. Uranium-238 is fissionable by fast neutrons, and is fertile, meaning it can be transmuted to fissile plutonium-239 in a nuclear reactor. Another fissile isotope, uranium-233, can be produced from natural thorium and is also important in nuclear technology. While uranium-238 has a small probability for spontaneous fission or even induced fission with fast neutrons, uranium-235 and to a lesser degree uranium-233 have a much higher fission cross-section for slow neutrons. In sufficient concentration, these isotopes maintain a sustained nuclear chain reaction. This generates the heat in nuclear power reactors, and produces the fissile material for nuclear weapons. Depleted uranium (238U) is used in kinetic energy penetrators and armor plating.

Uranium is used as a colorant in uranium glass producing orange-red to lemon yellow hues. It was also used for tinting and shading in early photography. The 1789 discovery of uranium in the mineral pitchblende is credited to Martin Heinrich Klaproth, who named the new element after the planet Uranus. Eugène-Melchior Péligot was the first person to isolate the metal and its radioactive properties were discovered in 1896 by Henri Becquerel. Research by Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner, Enrico Fermi and others, such as J. Robert Oppenheimer starting in 1934 led to its use as a fuel in the nuclear power industry and in Little Boy, the first nuclear weapon used in war. An ensuing arms race during the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union produced tens of thousands of nuclear weapons that used uranium metal and uranium-derived plutonium-239. The security of those weapons and their fissile material following the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991 is an ongoing concern for public health and safety.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gr9VekwQWFM



Environmental impact of brown coal and uranium mining in East Germany (Documentary, 1991)

In the aftermath of the collapse of the Soviet Union the world became aware of the devastating impact on the environment and on the health of the people by brown coal and uranium mining in the former East Germany and Czechoslovakia.

SAG/SDAG Wismut was a uranium mining company in East Germany during the time of the cold war. It produced a total of 230,400 tonnes of uranium between 1947 and 1990 and made East Germany the fourth largest producer of uranium ore in the world at the time. It was the largest single producer of uranium ore in the entire sphere of control of the USSR. In 1991 after German reunification it was transformed into the Wismut GmbH company, owned by the Federal Republic of Germany, which is now responsible for the restoration and environmental cleanup of the former mining and milling areas. The head office of SDAG Wismut / Wismut GmbH is in Chemnitz-Siegmar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzpGUEROpCs



Earth Habitability Linked to Uranium/Thorium ☢️ Inside the Planet

Hello and welcome! My name is Anton and in this video, we will talk about a recent study that analyzed the amount of thorium and uranium inside planet Earth in trying to find out how it led to the habitability of our planet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhfihH2JNtE



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Just don't eat radiated mushrooms?


Anyway, trying to track down in Mongoose Second any reference to fissionable fuel, specifically cost and endurance for spacecraft fission reactor.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Dec 13, 2020 11:31 am

China Lake 40mm Pump Action Grenade Launcher

Possibly the coolest small arm used by the United States in the Vietnam War was the China Lake 40mm pump action grenade launcher. Only 24 of these were made, each fitted by hand. Of those, 2 went to MACVSOG, 2 to Army Force Recon, and the remaining 20 the the Navy SEALS. They were used as an ambush initiation weapon, with 4 rounds of rapid-fire 40mm HE grenades available.

Only five original examples survive today; four in US museums and military institutions and one in a museum in Saigon. An effort was made in 2004 to build reproductions, it is one of those used in this video. This project was not ultimately successful, but did lead to a very interesting series of events with the Airtronic company and the US Marine Corps, which will be detailed in a following video. Special thanks to Dutch Hillenburg and Kevin Dockery for making this video possible!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PmCuJU6w0g



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Probably easier to schlep around then a revolver or a box magazine variant.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Dec 15, 2020 10:27 pm

We Could Produce Free Energy From Molecules By Using Graphene!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MsPHlwl ... ntonPetrov



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It's free, and presumably infinite.

After start up costs.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Dec 16, 2020 8:37 pm

QCD: Visualizing the Strongest Force in the Universe: Quantum Chromodynamics

QCD: Quantum Chromodynamics. How can positive protons be so close together in the nucleus, if they repel each other? Japanese physicist and Nobel laureate Hideki Yukawa sought to answer this question. He proposed the first significant theory of the strong nuclear force in 1934. He determined that this force must occur over a very small range.

Yukawa proposed that there must be a massive mediator particle that transfers this force between protons and neutrons. Using Einstein’s energy equivalence principle E=mc² and Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, he got a mass of 100 mega electron volts (MeV). This is close to what was found later to be correct -138 MeV. Yukawa coined the term meson for this particle.

New mesons and other particles kept getting discovered. This created a crisis in particle physics because all particles could not be fundamental. In 1964, Murry Gell-Mann and George Zweig proposed that the various particles that interacted with the strong nuclear force could be explained if they were composed of fundamental particles called quarks.

Gell-Mann said were three types of quarks - up, down and strange. And they all experience the strong force. The quark model proposed that mesons where made of a quark anti-quark pair.

But another way quarks could combine is in groups of 3 quarks. These became baryons, such as protons and neutrons. A proton is made of two up quarks and a down quark. The neutron is made of two down quarks and an up quark.

But one detected particle, a delta particle has 3 up quarks. This should be impossible because at least two of them would have the same quantum properties. And according to the Pauli exclusion principle, two fermions, with the same quantum properties cannot exist in the same location at the same time. This principle is the reason you can have only two electrons in any atomic orbital.

In 1964, American physicist Wally Greenberg proposed that quarks must have an additional property called color. Color is not optical, it is a metaphor for a kind of charge, a color charge. This would make the quarks not identical, so they could exist in the same particle.

There are three kinds of color – red, green, blue. You have to combine these colors to get a neutral white color, just like when you combine the visible colors. Similar to the way electric charge is conserved in QED, in QCD, color must be conserved, that is, all the colors must combine to get a neutral white.

But Pi mesons are only composed of two quarks. How do two quarks form a neutral color? There are anticolors called anti-red, anti-green, and anti-blue. When color, anti-color charges combine, they also form a neutral color charge.

But no one had ever detected a quark by itself. Scientists came up with an idea called quark confinement to explain how quarks are confined to within the nucleon - protons and neutrons. This implied that there must be something strongly holding these quarks together within the nucleon. A new particle, called a gluon, must exist to confer this attractive force.

Similar to the way QED, deals with electric charges and photons as the mediating particle for the electromagnetic force, QCD deals with color charges and the mediating particle called gluons. The difference is that photons are electrically neutral so they transmit the electromagnetic force, but they do not experience it The gluon, however not only transmits the strong force, but also has a color charge, so it experiences the strong force. Gluons interact with themselves.

As you pull two quarks apart, the strong force acts like a rubber band. The further you pull them apart, the more energy it takes. This tends to pull the quark back inside the proton or neutron. These gluon-gluon interactions constrain color fields to string-like objects called "flux tubes," which exert constant force when stretched. But if a quark is pulled with enough energy it pulls away until the flux tube breaks. The energy expended in pulling the quark apart results in a newly formed anti-quark pair - a meson. Mesons are a form of matter-antimatter particle, which do not last long, and are unstable. The longest last for only a few hundredths of a microsecond. This effectively limits their range to within less than the diameter of a proton.

One of the most important aspect of the strong nuclear force is that almost all the mass of an atom is due to QCD, not the Higgs field.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnbrRhkJCRk



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Mmmm, mesons ...
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Dec 18, 2020 12:18 am

Why Will This 'Magic' Mushroom Save the Human Race?

Thoughty2 (Arran) is a British YouTuber and gatekeeper of useless facts. Thoughty2 creates mind-blowing factual videos about science, tech, history, opinion and just about everything else.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5Jv0s5 ... =Thoughty2



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1. Wood wide web.

2. Possibly multidimensional drive.

3. Eat or be eaten.

4. Fungtastic.

5. Pseudo plastic.

6. Home grown.

7. Medicinal.

8. Magical.

9. Marriageable.

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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Dec 18, 2020 11:33 pm

The KelTec PCSC: Jeff Cooper's Origami Fever Dream

I forgot to mention but one of the design goals was to keep it FLAT!

KelTec Sub 2000 Gen 2 - Green

M-Carbo
KEL-TEC SUB-2000 All In One Pro Performance Trigger Job Bundle
KEL-TEC SUB-2000 Rear Tactical Folding Sights
KEL-TEC SUB-2000 Double Finger Extended Charging Handle
KEL-TEC SUB-2000 Recoil Buffer
KEL-TEC SUB-2000 RDL (Rapid Deployment Latch)

Red Lion
Gen 2 Sub2000 Front Sight
Gen 2 Sub 2000 Forend
19 Slot Picatinny Rail with hardware

Other
Blitzkrieg Components AR Spike Front Sight Post
BSA 2X20 Edge Series Pistol Scope

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-f83a17LBY



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If something is done long enough, ritualization occurs; and ritual demonstration is meant to scare off the other side without firing a shot.
Condottiere
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Dec 20, 2020 3:39 am

Amazing Planet Earth - Incredible Discoveries - Video Compilation

Hello wonderful person and welcome! My name is Anton and due to the 2020 housing crisis that's going on in some parts of the world, I ended up losing my apartment because the rent became too unbearable. As a result while I'm looking for a new place (probably 3-4 weeks or so), I made some pre-recorded long videos and a few other videos that will be posted daily.

Hope you enjoy them and see you soon.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dxhru7r ... ntonPetrov



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1. I wonder if it might just be easier to scoop chemicals from atmospheres, instead of manufacturing them.

2. Ice, ice, baby.

3. Collision alert.

4. Natural phenomenon - intellectual curiosity or Darwinian pressure?

5. Australia - radiation may explain toxic ecology.

6. Daylight Slowing Time.

7. Black swans are only bad luck if you didn't anticipate them and can't compensate.

8. If the Earth spinned faster in the past, it could connect to the stronger magnetic field.

9. Or requires midi chlorians, magnetism being a force and all.

10. Getting mooned.

11. Dancing With Dolphins.

12. Oxygen absorption.

13. Plate tectonics - puberty?

14. Venus sounds like a better prospect for terraforming.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Dec 20, 2020 3:46 am

10 Reasons Colonizing Venus is a Good Idea

In recent months, new research has come out suggesting that our historical love affair with Mars as a potential second home isn’t going to work out. From technological challenges related to radiation, gravity, water production, and human physiological and psychological problems that might arise due to prolonged isolation, it very much looks like Mars isn’t a good candidate for our second home...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8k9tBx ... el=TopTenz



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1. Ninety percent Terran standard gravity.

2. Natural chemical factory.

3. Solar shield and panelling.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Dec 20, 2020 4:08 am

Space Colonies: From Outposts to Cities

As we venture out into space to colonize new planets, moons, and asteroids, how will these new settlements grow from simple outposts in to developed worlds with cities and civilizations all their own?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XL1ehbG9EL8



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1. Market, supply and customers.

2. Gold rush.

3. local production.

4. Growth.

5. Ambition.

6. Organic development.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Dec 22, 2020 3:04 pm

Firearms Expert Reacts To Cyberpunk 2077 Weapons Trailer

Jonathan Ferguson, a firearms expert and Keeper of Firearms & Artillery at the Royal Armouries, reacts to a range of Cyberpunk 2077 weapons.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BornX8p ... l=GameSpot

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Firearms Expert Reacts To Cyberpunk 2077’s Guns

Jonathan Ferguson, a weapons expert and Keeper of Firearms & Artillery at the Royal Armouries, breaks down the weaponry of Cyberpunk 2077 and tries to figure out how the guns might work in real life.

Cyberpunk 2077 may be set in an alternate sci-fi future, but it’s still armed to the teeth with a load of fictional sci-fi weaponry: guns that have taken inspiration from real-world sources.

In the above video, Jonathan Ferguson--a weapons expert and Keeper of Firearms & Artillery at the Royal Armouries--breaks down the guns of Cyberpunk 2077 and compares them to their potential real-world counterparts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5mMJsILaps

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1. Greeblies

2. Slapping

3. Flicking

4. Boomsticks
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Dec 23, 2020 9:20 pm

5 Iconic Gaming Weapons That Aren't As Real As You Think | Loadout

Video games frequently use rare and unique prototype weapons in their virtual arsenals. From the chaotic shotgun and the Pancor Jackhammer, to Hitman’s trusty sniper rifle, the Walther WA2000, we break down 5 iconic gaming weapons that aren’t as real as you think.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cUJE6O ... l=GameSpot


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1. The revolving cylinder would allow different types of ammunition, that can be used, whether through a smart automated mechanism, or you colour code the shells and do it manually.

2. Folding gun seems more concealment by smuggling it in, rather than hiding it within your clothing.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Dec 25, 2020 1:27 am

Who paid $2000 for THIS...? - WALKCAR

Personal transportation devices aren't exactly new, but I'm not sure if it's the IT item everyone is looking to buy to use every day, especially when it's $2000.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrzDHpODOFc



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Then add an autonomous driving programme.

And a gravitational motor.

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