Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Discuss the Traveller RPG and its many settings
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Jan 31, 2020 7:25 pm

Changes I Would Make to the Solar System - xkcd Tribute

Hello and welcome! My name is Anton and in this video, we will try to create a BETTER version of the solar system based on the new comic from www.xkcd.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zVznheFthY



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So we lose Uranus, but we get more assteroids.

Though the red tide would now have a new intensity.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Feb 04, 2020 4:02 pm

An Augmented Reality Sight? The Self-Zeroing Foresight Smart Optic from Meprolight [SHOT Show 2020]

Meprolight describes their new Foresight optic as an Innovative Augmented Sight. Externally, it doesn’t look much different from Meprolight’s other red dot sights like the M5 Pro, but internally the hard and software is very different. The Mepro Foresight boasts the a number of features that stand out in the red dot market. It offers an almost computer game-like heads up display.

Not only does the Foresight have a reticle but it also has a compass feature, a leveller and in the near future will also enable round counts to be tracked. The sight is software, rather than hardware, driven with bluetooth connectivity and its own dedicated app – Meprolight, which allows customisation of settings and finer control of the sight’s features. The optic itself weighs 9.9 ounces and is 4.6″ x 2.35″ x 2.68″ in its dimensions.

Rather than running on a conventional cell battery it uses a rechargeable battery that can be charged with a USB-C cable. The sight without the app comes with 5 in-built reticles but with the app this grows to 10 with customisable settings.The app is currently available on bother apple and android phones. These reticles and various settings can be set to particular rifles to enable zeros with different weapons to be stored on a smartphone. Meptolight also confirm that the sight works well with magnifiers and further updates will arrive in the future.

The next update is imminent and the most interesting new feature will be the inclusion of a shot counter which will help users track how many rounds you have put through the host gun. The round counter is based on vibration and recoil impulses to provide an accurate round count which might be used for maintenance scheduling. The counter is user defined and will track the round count from use to use of the weapon, even after the sight has been turned off and on with each use. Future features might include an onboard camera or a laser rangefinder built in.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJwf7ISU9Vg


Eventually, you just attach your smartphone on top of your gun; it has cameras, and do any number of calculations that will tell you what's out there, if your barrel is pointing in the correct direction, and predict where the target will move next.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:46 pm

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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:02 pm

Budget Space Suits

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Now available for only five Credite Imperiale.

Detachable patches ordered separately.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sat Feb 15, 2020 12:49 pm

How much WATER is needed to produce 1kg of FOOD 🍔🍏🍩

Graphical representation of how much water is needed to produce (the entire production chain) 1kg of food.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FUBNSA6VN0



Something for the hydroponists to ponder upon, when setting up the biospheres.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Feb 20, 2020 2:01 pm

Is Our Entire Universe Held Together By One Mysterious Number?

1/137 is a universal constant that determines how stars burn, how chemical reactions happen, and if it were off by just a few percentage points—all of this might not even be here. But what happens if it shifts?

Watch more Focal Point! | https://bit.ly/2ZJieda

Read More:

There's a Glitch At The Edge of The Universe That Could Remake Physics
https://www.newscientist.com/article/...
‘String theory, one well-backed bet for a next-generation theory of physics, proposes the existence of tiny, curled-up dimensions we can’t see. That has effects on things like alpha.”

Humankind’s Existentially Lucky Numbers
https://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/23/sc...
“With every event, forking paths of possibilities branch out into the future. Pick one of the multitude that didn’t become real, and you might have the plot for a good counterfactual novel.”

A Brief History of The Grand Unified Theory of Everything
http://nautil.us/issue/46/balance/a-b...
When we ask, “Why are we here?,” at a fundamental level we may as well be asking, “Why is the Higgs here?” And the Standard Model gives no answer to this question.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsJhdHVfgx8



Would have betted on forty two.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Feb 20, 2020 10:25 pm

How we can use light to see deep inside our bodies and brains | Mary Lou Jepsen

In a series of mind-bending demos, inventor Mary Lou Jepsen shows how we can use red light to see and stimulate what's inside our bodies and brains. Taking us to the edge of optical physics, Jepsen unveils new technologies that utilize light and sound to track tumors, measure neural activity and could eventually replace the MRI machine with a cheaper, more efficient and wearable system.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awADEuv5vWY
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Feb 20, 2020 10:26 pm

A New Laser Technology Can See Inside Our Bodies Like Never Before

While X-rays can produce harmful radiation, a new technique using laser-induced sound waves provides highly detailed images of the structures in our bodies.

Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging imaging technique that shoots micro-pulses of laser light at a specimen or body part, which selectively heats up parts of the tissue causing them to expand, and generate waves of pressure –– a.k.a. sound waves.

Ultrasonic sensors are situated to capture these microscopic changes, and a processing software then reconstructs the image based on what the sensors “hear.” The speed of the laser can be adjusted depending on what type of tissue one would like to visualize.

The photoacoustic imaging technique is beginning to take off in both the medical and scientific worlds, as it provides us with super clear, incredibly detailed images of the human body and the structures inside it.

Not to mention, the imaging technique causes no discomfort and there is no dangerous ionizing radiation involved, making it a desirable alternative to more traditional imaging, like a CT scan, ultrasound, or a PET scan.

Not only can this new imaging technology be used to image tissues at extremely high resolution, you can also introduce a foreign material, like a contrast dye or a specially designed nanoparticle, to see things you might not be able to otherwise.

Although the technique has been around for more than a century, photoacoustic imaging is just starting to be clinically explored as an alternative and prototype clinical machinery is in development.

Learn more about this revolutionary imaging technique on this episode of Elements.

#Medicine #Imaging #Lasers #Technology #Seeker #Elements #Science

Read More:
Photoacoustic Imaging
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti...
"Possessing many attractive characteristics such as the use of non-ionizing electromagnetic waves, good resolution/contrast, portable instrumention, as well as the ability to quantitate the signal to a certain extent, photoacoustic techniques have been applied for the imaging of cancer, wound healing, disorders in the brain, gene expression, among others."

Photoacoustic imaging enables scientists to step up war on cancer
https://www.ft.com/content/c023c7a2-f...
"Photoacoustic imaging delivers exquisitely detailed images of biological tissue purely by listening to the sound that light makes. Ultrashort pulses of laser light of a few billionths of a second are directed at the tissue and selectively absorbed, depending on the colour of different constituents of the tissue."

The Eclectic History of Medical Imaging
https://www.itnonline.com/article/ecl...
"In the 1940s and early 1950s, shoe salesmen flipped a switch and shoppers could see their toes wiggling on fluoroscopes. At their height, some 10,000 of these devices were in use at shoe stores across the United States. X-rays, emitted by a tube mounted near the floor, penetrated the shoes and feet, then struck a fluorescent screen on the other side."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_OUzqpsVP4[/i]
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Feb 20, 2020 10:28 pm

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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Mon Feb 24, 2020 11:32 am

This 3D-Printed Bunny Could Be the Future of Data Storage

Just like 1s and 0s are the way computers encode information, DNA base pairs do the same. And although this plastic rabbit is not alive, instructions for how to replicate it are encoded into the rabbit itself.

But DNA offers more density than 1s and 0s, packing all of the instructions for a human body into the nucleus of a cell. And research teams around the world have been demonstrating that they’re able to encode hundreds of thousands of terabytes of digital data in GRAM-quantities of DNA.

Picture hundreds of thousands one-terabyte hard drives and all of the information you could store on them—videos, photos, and more—and then picture all that information being stored in just a few grams of biological material. DNA offers quite the improvement to existing digital data storage methods, like the chips, spinning discs and magnetic tape that you might be used to.

And this 3D-printed plastic rabbit is a first foray into what researchers are calling the ‘DNA of Things.’ So how exactly do you get DNA into a plastic object like this?

Find out more about this innovation, what it could mean for the future of data storage, as well as how it could be utilized in all kinds of industries, like construction, pharmaceuticals and electronics in this Elements.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNzHcaQov80


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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Feb 25, 2020 5:20 pm

Life, Love And Sex In Space | SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW

For 40 years now, people have been living in outer space - first on the space stations Salyut and Skylab, today on the ISS, and perhaps, soon, in a spaceship to Mars. What is an astronaut’s life like, and what will it be like in the future? What challenges do showering, eating and sleeping bring? Astronaut Prof. Dr. Ulrich Walter explains in Spacetime how it all works, how these challenges in space are met and overcome, in everyday life, work and even love.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmDWotkLBAk



Spacestation vodka.

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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Feb 27, 2020 2:36 am

'Magic' Angle Graphene Is BACK...with an Even Bigger Twist

In 2018, the discovery of something called a “magic angle” in graphene rocked the physics community.

Graphene is a single-atom thick layer of carbon that forms a hexagonal lattice pattern, and its atomic arrangement gives graphene certain exciting properties, like being more than 200 times stronger than steel, flexible, transparent, and highly conductive.

And that last property, the highly conductive one, was highlighted in 2018 when researchers put two layers of graphene on top of each other and twisted them at exactly 1.1 degrees. They cooled the graphene structure to just above absolute zero, applied a strong electric field, and found that not only are these graphene bilayers highly conductive...but that they exhibit alternating areas of conductivity and insulation.

This means that scientists saw graphene bilayers (with a twist) behaving like a superconductor. And the thing is, we don’t really know why.

And now this year, while exploring the capabilities of this seemingly ‘magical’ twist further, scientists uncovered something that is arguably an even bigger deal.

An international team at the Institute of Photonic Science in Barcelona made what they call ‘magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene devices,’ by taking two stacks of graphene rotated at the magic angle, and using a mechanical squeezing process to eliminate impurities. This version of the experiment allowed researchers to see details they hadn’t before, like the device’s incredible versatility.

Find out more about how this magic angle graphene can act as an insulator, superconductor, or magnet on this Elements.

#Graphene #Superconductors #Physics #Science #Seeker #Elements

These Strange Metals Could Make Electronics Perfectly Efficient https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQcKE...

Read More:

A Physics Magic Trick: Take 2 Sheets of Carbon and Twist
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/30/sc...
"'He’s the guy who’s done this the best,' Andrea Young, a physics professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara who was not involved in the research, said of Dr. Efetov and his collaborators. 'Somehow they have the magic touch.'"

Superconductivity: What Is It and Why It Matters to Our Future
https://interestingengineering.com/su...
"To get material into a superconductive state, the material has to be frozen to an extremely low temperature, sometimes to only a few degrees above absolute zero (-459.67 degrees Fahrenheit, -273.15 degrees Celsius). Then, for reasons that we still cannot explain, electrical resistance abruptly stops, and an electrical current can continue around a circuit seemingly forever."

Physicists Have Officially Smashed The Record For High-Temperature Superconductivity
https://www.sciencealert.com/physicis...
"So-called room-temperature superconductivity, above 0 degrees Celsius, is something of a white whale for scientists. If it could be achieved, it would revolutionise electrical efficiency, vastly improving power grids, high-speed data transfer, and electrical motors, to name a few potential applications."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSn57YVDvHg
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Feb 27, 2020 2:43 am

Major Breakthrough: Graphene Batteries FINALLY Hit the Market

Previous Samsung graphene video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Go2g_...

Correction: I said the two scientists won the Nobel Peace prize, I misspoke. It was the Nobel Physics prize, sorry about that. Enjoy the video!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnE1nO6o-do



Lithium Glass batteries move to next stage
by NICK FARRELL on25 FEBRUARY 2020

Battery technology might have legs

For ages, we have been writing about battery breakthroughs and yet none of them seems to appear in your smartphone. However, a rapid-charging and non-flammable battery developed in part by 2019 Nobel Prize winner John Goodenough (pictured) has been licensed for development by the Canadian electric utility Hydro-Québec.

The cunning plan is to have the batteries ready for one or more commercial partners in two years.

Hydro-Québec, according to Karim Zaghib, general director of the utility’s Center of Excellence in Transportation Electrification and Energy Storage, has been commercializing patents with Goodenough’s parent institution, the University of Texas at Austin, for the past 25 years.

Goodenough and Maria Helena Braga, professor of engineering at the University of Porto in Portugal, developed a solid-state lithium rechargeable that used a glass doped with alkali metals as the battery’s electrolyte. The electrolyte is the material between cathode and anode and is often a liquid in today’s batteries, which typically means it’s also flammable and potentially vulnerable to battery fires.

Braga said her and Goodenough’s battery is high-capacity and charges in “minutes rather than hours”, performs well in both hot and cold weather, and that its solid-state electrolyte is not flammable.

“For the next two years we do research and development in order to prove the concept and to scale the materials”, Zaghib said.

Hydro-Québec’s research lab, which Zaghib says comprises 120 people, works with both early-stage technologies like the Goodenough glass battery and also with technologies already at commercial scale.

This latter category includes another Goodenough invention, the lithium iron phosphate battery.

“This is one of the safest materials for lithium-ion today”, Zaghib said. “It’s used for electric buses and for energy storage.”

Beginning in 1996, Zaghib says, Goodenough and Hydro-Québec struck up a partnership to commercialize this lithium battery. Licensees of this technology include the now Chinese-owned A123 and the Japanese battery company Murata Manufacturing.

https://www.fudzilla.com/news/50364-lit ... next-stage
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Mar 03, 2020 8:09 am

Fictional BUILDINGS Size Comparison

⭐️This video shows some fictional buildings / structures (Movies, series, video games ...). Obviously not all, only some more prominent. Some buildings have been left out because they are impossible to measure, or because they are in real life. Buildings that have a margin of error (±) are measured by myself.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjIci91FRX4
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Mar 04, 2020 6:16 am

How the Army wants to use your boots to generate juice (and keep tabs on you)
Todd South
December 19, 2019

Two new footwear advances could help soldiers use their own footsteps to charge devices in the field and enable commanders to track their location.

The Army recently awarded a $16.5 million contract to Robotic Research LLC for a sensor unit that fits on a boot and can be used to track individual soldier locations, even in GPS-denied environments, according to a Robotic Research statement.

Soldiers are carrying more electronic gear than ever before, and those radios, tablets, sensors and other devices need to be charged. And it’s hard to find a wall socket on the battlefield.
One novel way to get after the charging problem while still keeping soldiers on the move comes in the form of a recent patent out of the Army’s C5ISR Center, which is developing a shoe insole that can generate electricity with each step.

As the soldier’s heel pushes down into the insole, the force hits a miniature rotational level mechanism, turning a small generator, which creates an electric charge.
New Jersey Army National Guard Sgt. Michael Henri runs through misty weather during the 12-mile ruck march portion of the 2018 New Jersey National Guard Best Warrior competition. (Master Sgt. Matt Hecht/Air Force)

“We embedded an energy-harvesting mechanism into a combat boot heel insole so that each time a soldier’s heel strikes it activates a generator, which spins to produce energy,” Nathan Sharpes, a C5ISR Center mechanical engineer who developed the patent, told techlinkcenter.org.

The developers had a previous version but it gave the foot an unnatural feel while taking each step. So, engineers went to work to make it better.

“We improved the mechanism by making each step feel more natural versus the slight sinking motion soldiers experienced when using our previous version. We also sped up the generator’s timing mechanism to produce energy for longer than the previous version, which is a positive direction to achieve harvester efficiency.”

Another engineer at the center, Julie Douglas, has also built a rucksack that converts energy created when the pack moves to an electrical charge.

Army Times reported last year that Army developers were also testing a “kinetic knee harvester” that uses the motion of a soldier’s legs to build electrical current as the soldier marches.
The backpack frame kinetic harvesters are more efficient when soldiers are going uphill, Noel Soto a systems engineer with the Army’s Research, Development and Engineering Command told Army Times in 2018, as that’s when their rucksacks move the most.

Soldiers are trained to fasten everything down. But a loose-fitting rucksack creates more movement, resulting in more energy-harvesting efficiency, Soto said. For that reason, soldiers preferred the kinetic knee harvesters.

The knee harvest mechanism also helps soldiers brake better when going downhill, so they have a better-controlled descent, which can decrease fatigue, Soto said.
And they provide similar power output — 6 watts uphill and 30 watts downhill, as compared 8 to 40 watts, depending on wobble.

Army researchers have also been experimenting with wearable, flexible solar panels that can scoop up the sun’s rays to charge devices when weather permits.

https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-arm ... bs-on-you/
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Mar 05, 2020 9:56 pm

Virgin America Safety Video #VXsafetydance

I wrote the song for the new in flight safety video for Virgin America. Check it out and make sure you fly Virgin!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1A5BtqsaPM



Image

Or Extra Virgin Lite.

1. Seatbelts.

2. It's a religious experience.

3. Passengers must demonstrate flexibility.

4. Secure loose objects during take off and landing.

5. Adults first.

6. Air vest, probably with air purifier.

7. Identify hatches.

8. Inflatable rescue bubbles.

9. No smoking.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4CEJp_3S5A
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Mar 06, 2020 8:14 pm

Artificial Leaf Technology Could One Day Power Our World

Scientists at the University of Waterloo in Canada have come up with a new design for an artificial leaf. Not only is this technology 10 times more efficient than plant photosynthesis, it might help us move away from the fossil fuels that are getting us into so much trouble.

Since the 1970s, research groups from around the world have been vying to create the first fully-functioning, commercially viable artificial leaf. As a result, various iterations of artificial leaf technologies have unfurled across the world, with each new design building on the success of its predecessors. But the latest breakthrough comes from a Waterloo University-based team.

Instead of producing glucose and oxygen like plants do, this artificial leaf tech is capable of producing methanol, which is a cleaner burning fuel than gasoline, while also scrubbing carbon dioxide from the air and producing oxygen.

Find out more about the different approaches to artificial leaf tech and how this latest research could provide us with an alternative to petroleum and petroleum byproducts in this Elements.

#Photosynthesis #ArtificialLeaf #fossilfuels #tech #Seeker #Elements #Science

____________________

Read More:
Scientists create 'artificial leaf' that turns carbon dioxide into fuel
https://uwaterloo.ca/news/news/scient...
"An hour-long chemical reaction creates the engineered red powder
that is the key to new technology to turn carbon dioxide into fuel."

The race to invent the artificial leaf
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/61...
"Liquid fuels already have enormous global infrastructure networks, including storage facilities, transcontinental pipelines, and oil supertankers, not to mention ubiquitous filling stations around the world. A device that could transform sunlight into fuels that are already commonly used could piggyback on that infrastructure."

The Artificial Leaf: Daniel Nocera’s vision for sustainable energy.
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...
"His emphasis is largely humanitarian; it also arises from his belief, as a scientist, that the only way to meet the world’s projected energy needs without causing intolerable environmental harm will be to work, in effect, from the bottom up—an approach that’s very different from the ones that dominate energy research."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RRhGRSsiKxQ
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Mar 11, 2020 7:24 am

Study: Building a better super-capacitor out of super-stinky durian fruit
Durian and jackfruit make better, cheaper aerogels for super-capacitors.

JENNIFER OUELLETTE - 3/7/2020, 9:00 PM

Widely known and revered in Southeast Asia as the "king of fruits," the durian is distinctive for its large size, strong odor (often compared to rotten onions, raw sewage, or turpentine), and formidable thorn-covered husk.

The ubiquity in the modern world of consumer electronics has created a corresponding demand for better super-capacitors for energy storage, thereby enabling rapid-charging for our mobile phones, tablets, laptops, and electric cars. But the best materials for building high-performance super-capacitors are often costly. Now, scientists from the University of Sydney in Australia have successfully created a low-cost alternative, building electrodes for super-capacitors out of waste scraps from durian and jackfruit, according to a new paper in the Journal of Energy Storage.

"Durian waste, as a zero-cost substance that the community wants to get rid of urgently due to its repulsive, nauseous smell, is a sustainable source that can transform the waste into a product to substantially reduce the cost of energy storage through our chemical-free, green synthesis protocol," said co-author Vincent Gomes of the University of Sydney in Australia.

Scientists have typically relied on a variety of carbon-based materials as electrodes when building super-capacitors: activated carbon, carbon nanotubes, and graphene sheets, for example. It's best to use materials that boast high porosity, since they help diffuse electrolytes through the electrodes, and to maximize surface area.

A 2010 paper found that electrodes based on aerogels are even better than standard carbon materials in terms of maximizing capacitance. Aerogels are 99.8 percent air, making them pretty much the lightest known solid material. They were first synthesized in 1931—the result of a bet between Samuel Kistler and Charles Learned over who could best replace all the liquid in "jellies" with a gas. The trick is super-critical drying, which retains the structure of the original gel. Carbon-based aerogels appeared in the 1980s and are favored for many applications by NASA, among others, since they are extremely light-weight with exceptional thermal insulation properties.

But many of these advanced materials are also costly, sparking interest in using organic waste as precursor materials when making electrodes out of aerogels, such as pomelo peel, paper pulp, and watermelon. The waste can be simply freeze-dried to eliminate water while still retaining the hierarchical structure that makes for a good aerogel.

"The structural precision of natural biomass with the hierarchical pores, developed over millions of years of biological evolution, affords an outstanding resource as a template for the synthesis of carbon-based materials," Gomes and his co-authors wrote. That, in turn, means organic waste would help achieve high-performance energy storage at lower costs.

Schematic process for turning durian fruit into a carbon aerogel.

Enter the durian, known as the "king of fruits" in the Southeast Asia regions where it is especially popular. Its most distinctive feature is its strong odor—so persistent that it can linger for days, which is why many hotels and public transport systems in Asia don't allow durian fruit at all. Naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace praised the fruit as "a rich custard highly flavored with almonds," while acknowledging it initially smelled like rotten onions. Novelist Anthony Burgess claimed the experience was "like eating sweet raspberry blancmange in the lavatory."

Smell aside, the durian's inedible spongy core turns out to be ideal for making biomass-based aerogels. First, Gomes et al. selected pieces of both durian and jackfruit, looking for those that were very porous and had a large surface area. They picked the jackfruit from a tree in Australia and purchased the durian at a local market, then took core samples from each piece of fruit, rinsing them off with deionized water to remove all the dirt and debris.

Next, they converted the fruit waste into a carbon aerogel. The samples were placed in Teflon autoclaves and heated for ten hours at 180° C (356° F), and then cooled over night. Then the samples were rinsed and freeze-dried. To carbonize the freeze-dried samples, they were heated in a furnace for an hour at 800° C (1,472° F), yielding "black, highly porous, ultra-light aerogels," per the authors.

Finally, the Australian team used the fruit-derived aerogels to build electrodes and then tested them to assess how well they stored energy. Both durian and jackfruit waste produced aerogels with excellent energy storage properties, although the durian-based ones performed a bit better than those derived from jackfruit. That makes sense, since the durian-based carbon aerogels also proved to have significantly greater porosity and surface area than the jackfruit-based aerogels. Both, however, provide a comparable (and cheaper) alternative to the activated carbon super-capacitors currently being used for energy storage.

"We have reached a point where we must urgently discover and produce ways to create and store energy using sustainably-sourced materials that do not contribute to global warming," said Gomes. "Confronted with this and the world's rapidly depleting supplies of fossil fuels, naturally-derived super-capacitors are leading the way for developing high efficiency energy storage devices."

DOI: Journal of Energy Storage, 2020. 10.1016/j.est.2019.101152 (About DOIs).

https://arstechnica.com/science/2020/03 ... e-someday/
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Mar 12, 2020 4:20 pm

Winchester's Liberator Shotguns

In the early 1960s, an influential but little-known (today) firearms designer by the name of Robert Hillberg came up with an idea for a cheap-but-effective armament for the masses. With encouragement from DARPA, the Winchester company took up manufacture and development of the design, under the name "Liberator".

The guns were initially planned to be made almost entirely as magnesium castings, with steel liners in the barrels, with a total cost of about $20 per gun. They would use prepackaged 4-round ammunition packets as well, rather than standard individual shotgun shells. By the time production was actually begun, however, the design had been altered to a break-action system using regular shells - the prepackaged quad-cartridges proved too difficult to perfect. So the production Mark II guns used conventional shells with a break-open action.

As it turned out, casting the frames over the steel barrel inserts was a quite difficult process, and Winchester soon moved to a MkIII design which replace the barrel casting with 4 independent all-steel barrels fixed at the muzzles by a stamped plate. By this time, however, military interest in the guns had fallen away and Winchester was left to try to market them commercially. They attempted to interest both police and civilian markets (although with 13 inch barrels, the guns were regulated by the NFA). None of these marketing attempts succeeded, and major production never began. The design was too impractical and guerrilla-oriented to really appeal to anyone with a more ordinary use (like recreational shooting, sport shooting, or security/law enforcement) in mind.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQK9JNsrq_8



Image

1. Anti boarding; relatively idiot proof.

2. Reminds me of a derringer.

3. It's possible that you might have a three barrel variant with longer tubes, to comply with possible local fire arm regulations.

4. Selective barrel discharge, which would mean you could have different munitions.

5. Rather doubt it's effectiveness in a modern insurgency.

6. Mini grenade launcher.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sat Mar 14, 2020 1:45 pm

20 stars: from the Sun to UY Scuti seen from Pluto

Compare the size of the best-known dwarf and giant stars, seen from the dwarf planet Pluto, 5,900 million km, taking the place of the Sun, the center of the solar system. The stars are: The Sun, Alpha Centauri, Sirio, Vega, Bellatrix, Pollux, Arturo, Aldebaran, Rigel A, Deneb, Antares, Betelgeuse, AH Scorpii, KY Cygni, VY Canis Majoris, VX Sagittarii, Westerlund, Woh G64, NML Cygni and 1. UY Scuti.

Copyright: CamenGat Creative Astronomy. All rights reserved.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_p2DNkef5RM

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