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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 3:02 pm
by Condottiere
Image

That gets you mobile dirtside for six hundred schmuckers.

Plus cold beer on hand.

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 6:39 am
by Condottiere
Image

Blow up car.

Or air/raft.

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Sat Nov 25, 2017 5:55 pm
by steve98052
Condottiere wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 6:39 am
Blow up car.

Or air/raft.
Haha!

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 9:04 pm
by Condottiere

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:37 am
by Condottiere
New Experimental US Army Rifle Uses "Telescoped" Ammunition

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oe8bCfL9kzw

Belted ammunition probably provides enough separation to prevent cook off for caseless ammunition, as well as visual quality control.

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Thu Dec 07, 2017 10:39 am
by Condottiere
Image

You're always need a pickup.

For a pickup.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Be6FLU1ny9E

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 6:36 pm
by Condottiere
Strange But True: Astronauts Get Taller in Space

By Miriam Kramer, Space.com Staff Writer | January 7, 2013 06:00am ET

NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 33 commander; and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, pose for a photo in the Cupola of the International Space Station. This image was taken Sept. 23, 2012.
Credit: NASA
Astronauts in space can grow up to 3 percent taller during the time spent living in microgravity, NASA scientists say. That means that a 6-foot-tall (1.8 meters) person could gain as many as 2 inches (5 centimeters) while in orbit.

While scientists have known for some time that astronauts experience a slight height boost during a months-long stay on the International Space Station, NASA is only now starting to use ultrasound technology to see exactly what happens to astronauts' spines in microgravity as it occurs.

"Today there is a new ultrasound device on the station that allows more precise musculoskeletal imaging required for assessment of the complex anatomy and the spine," the study's principal investigator Scott Dulchavsky said in a statement. "The crew will be able to perform these complex evaluations in the next year due to a newly developed Just-In-Time training guide for spinal ultrasound, combined with refinements in crew training and remote guidance procedures."

A better understanding of the spine’s elongation in microgravity could help physicians develop more effective rehabilitation techniques to aid astronauts in their return to Earth’s gravity following space station missions.

This image shows the opening screen for a training tool used by astronauts to practice taking ultrasound scans of their spines while in space. The study aims to measure how astronauts grow taller while living in microgravity.

Past studies have shown that when the spine is not exposed to the pull of Earth's gravity, the vertebra can expand and relax, allowing astronauts to actually grow taller. That small gain is short lived, however. Once the astronauts return to Earth, their height returns to normal after a few months. But still, scientists haven't been able to examine the astronaut's spinal columns when experiencing the effects of microgravity until now.

This month, astronauts will begin using the ultrasound device to scan each other's backs to see exactly what their spines look like after 30, 90 and 150 days in microgravity. Researchers will see the medical results in real time as the astronaut take turns scanning their spines of their crewmates.

Astronauts typically visit the space station in six-month increments, allowing for long-term studies of how the human body changes over time in microgravity.

"Ultrasound also allows us to evaluate physiology in motion, such as the movement of muscles, blood in vessels, and function in other systems in the body," Dulchavsky said. "Physiological parameters derived from ultrasound and Doppler give instantaneous observations about the body non-invasively without radiation."

Astronauts typically visit the space station in six-month increments, allowing for long-term studies of how the human body changes over time in microgravity.

https://www.space.com/19116-astronau...ce-spines.html

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 11:11 am
by Condottiere
Uplifted: Who's A Pretty Candidate?

Courtesy of the Milford Road Alliance ( Downer / NZTA). Keas often watch them doing activities in the scrub, and then try to copy the actions when they have gone - particularly if the action has a consequence. So they would have watched the road workers at the Homer tunnel placing cones on the road with the consequence being traffic movements - then thought 'lets have a go at that'.

Keas are attracted to people, because people bring fun things to play with. Sadly, their intelligence and curiosity led to them being branded as pests, and resulted in their rapid decline. While they are now protected, they are nationally endangered.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BomW3hlFuM

One estimate is the intelligence of a four year old.

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 11:19 am
by Linwood
Wikipedia notes that there is evidence of keas attacking healthy sheep. That’s contributed to their decline as well.

But take away (or modify) that behavior and they might make interesting (if troublesome) pets for Travellers.

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:44 pm
by Condottiere
Can Wind Turbines Really Work On Mars?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xtW7g4R_vs

After my look at Surviving Mars lots of people called out the game for using wind turbines for energy generation on the surface of Mars. A planet which has an atmospheric pressure of less than 1% of Earth's, which would surely render such air driven devices as useless. However, it turns out that wind power is viable on Mars, even if solar remains as the best option during daylight hours.

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:27 am
by Condottiere
Air/Raft

https://youtu.be/aBr2kKAHN6M

So simple, a dummy can drive it.

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 6:29 pm
by Condottiere
World Building: Gas Giants


Gas Giant Moon Systems and Habitable Moons

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Evq7n2cCTlg


Worldbuilding - Gas Giant Myths

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wK3lMcz8zcA


Worldbuilding - Extrasolar Gas Giants

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNYERPMnO3I


Wasn't sure if this qualified under Spaceships: Refueling.

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Posted: Sun Feb 18, 2018 8:30 am
by Condottiere
This Special Training Keeps Astronauts From Vomiting Everywhere

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kM2kVCThoS8

Astronauts get motion sickness, too! However, through training with NASA scientists like Dr. Patricia Cowings, they learn to control it.