Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Discuss the Traveller RPG and its many settings
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Aug 26, 2021 9:39 pm

Vehicle: Airship

70. Speaking of infrastructure, it's not just the cost of the other vehicles per space, but the whole enchilada.

71. Now, I'm not sure what the cost of railroad per mile, or highway per mile, is, but disregarding the graft and paying off the politicians that awarded the contract, it's still going to be expensive.

72. And of course, the compulsory purchase orders and eminent domained real estate that the highways and railroads are built on.

73. However, once you're beyond the low hanging fruit of the alluvial plains, and start construction on difficult terrain.

74. The airship would be ideal for communications across really difficult terrain, such as large stretches' of water, desert, jungle, swamp, arctic and so on.

75. Mountains with conflicting air currents might be stretching it.

76. You can do hop scotch direct flights with the airship, as long as the stop has the infrastructure to anchor the airship, and allow the transfer of passengers and freight.

77. A heavy propellered aircraft has a default 25'000 starbux/high speed at three kiloklix range per space, half the default range of an airship.

78. Likely, you'd also need a long runway, unless you add on accessories.

79. The jet variant is three times more expensive, and would need an even longer runway.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Aug 26, 2021 10:32 pm

Vehicle: Airship

80. Against sea freighters, you have 5'000 starbux/slow, at a six kiloklix range, per space.

81. Decades ago, the typical freight railcar had a new cost below $50,000. Today, the typical freight railcar is in the $100,000 to $150,000 range.

82. Freight railcars are built to different loading weights. Older railcar capacity is a maximum of 263,000 pounds when fully loaded (including the car’s tare weight). Modern railcars built after 1989 are typically built with a heavy axle design and have a capacity of 286,000 pounds.

83. Sea freighters can take massive amounts of cargo, aircraft can deliver them faster, railways have a constant flow at a very economical price per supposed space, in theory.

84. Unless we'd railroad the light and heavy ground vehicles, how much railways cost in Traveller is a bit of a mystery.

85. Heavy hovercrafts cost 20'000 starbux per space/high speed per space, at a half kiloklix range.

86. They're amphibious, but will have trouble with broken ground.

87. The helicopter is maxed out at two hundred spaces, but costs 25'000 starbux/high speed at seven kiloklix range.

88. Everything is a compromise in someway or another.

89. But as long as the airship isn't being shot at, in an infrastructure poor region, might actually be the best option.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Aug 27, 2021 10:26 am

Vehicle: Airship Lifting Body


Image


The Walrus HULA (Hybrid Ultra Large Aircraft) project was a DARPA-funded experiment to create an airship capable of traveling up to 12,000 nautical miles (about 22,000 km) in range, while carrying 500-1000 tons of air cargo. In distinct contrast to earlier generation airships, the Walrus HULA would be a heavier-than-air vehicle and would generate lift through a combination of aerodynamics, thrust vectoring, and gas buoyancy generation and management.

DARPA said advances in envelope and hull materials, buoyancy and lift control, drag reduction and propulsion combined to make this concept feasible. Technologies to be investigated in the initial study phase included vacuum/air buoyancy compensator tanks, which provide buoyancy control without ballast, and electrostatic atmospheric ion propulsion.

The WALRUS could potentially expand and speed the strategic airlift capability of the United States substantially while simultaneously reducing costs. A smaller scale demonstration was scheduled for 2008, when a small scale version of the WALRUS designed to carry only the capacity of a C-130 Hercules (i.e., 18,000 kg or about 40,000 lbs) was expected to fly.

The project was cancelled in 2010.[1]
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Aug 27, 2021 10:29 am

Vehicle: Airships Lifting Body


A hybrid airship is a powered aircraft that obtains some of its lift as a lighter-than-air (LTA) airship and some from aerodynamic lift as a heavier-than-air aerodyne.

A dynastat is a hybrid airship with fixed wings and/or a lifting body and is typically intended for long-endurance flights. It requires forward flight to create the aerodynamic lift component.

A rotastat is a hybrid airship with rotary wings and is typically intended for heavy lift applications. Its rotary wings can provide lift even when hovering or manoeuvring vertically, like a helicopter.

No production designs have been built, but several manned and unmanned prototypes have flown.

The term "hybrid airship" has also been used to describe an airship comprising a mix of rigid, semi-rigid, and non-rigid construction.

Features
Conventional airships have low operating costs because they need no engine power to remain airborne, but are limited in several ways, including low payload/volume ratios and low speeds. Additionally, ground handling of an airship can be difficult. Because it is floating, in even a light breeze it is susceptible to wind buffeting.

On the other hand, heavier-than-air aircraft, or aerodynes, especially rotorcraft, require the constant use of power to generate lift, and conventional airplanes also require runways.

The hybrid airship combines the airship's aerostatic lift, from a lighter-than-air gas such as helium, with the heavier-than-air craft's dynamic lift from movement through the air. Such a hybrid craft is still heavier than air, which makes it similar in some ways to a conventional aircraft. The dynamic lift may be provided by helicopter-like rotary wings (the rotastat), or a lift-producing shape similar to a lifting body combined with horizontal thrust (the dynastat), or a combination of the two.[1][2]

Hybrid airships are intended to fill the middle ground between the low operating cost and low speeds of traditional airships and the higher speed but higher fuel consumption of heavier-than-air craft. By combining dynamic and buoyant lift, hybrids are intended to provide improved airspeed, air-cargo payload capacity and (in some types) hovering capability compared to a pure airship, while having longer endurance and greater lifting capacity compared to a pure aerodyne.

Hybrid aircraft technology is claimed to allow a wider range of flight-performance optimizations ranging from significantly heavier than air to near buoyant. This perception of uncommon dynamic flight range when coupled with an appropriate landing system is claimed to allow ultra heavy and affordable airlift transportation.[citation needed]

Design
Compared to a conventional airship, the hybrid can be made smaller and does not need to carry ballast for altitude control, while compared to a heavier-than-air craft the hybrid requires either a smaller rotor or a shorter runway.[2]

Where the dynastat is seen as more promising in the longer-distance passenger and freight roles, the rotastat is anticipated to be more suitable as a "flying crane" able to lift heavy external loads for shorter distances.[2]

Some airships employ thrust vectoring, typically using pivoted ducted fan propulsors, to provide additional lift when the engine thrust is no longer needed for forward propulsion. Once airspeed is gained, the craft can use body lift to help carry a load greater than its aerostatic lift capacity alone.[citation needed] However, such airships are not usually regarded as hybrids.

Dynastats
The dynastat obtains additional lift by flying through the air. Configurations studied have included using deltoid (triangular), lenticular (circular), or flattened hulls, or adding a fixed wing.

Some early airships were fitted with wing planes, with the intention of providing additional dynamic lift.[citation needed] However, the added lift of planes can be less efficient than simply increasing the volume of the airship. At low air speeds, of 60 mph (97 km/h) or less, the increase in lift obtained by the use of planes on an airship would require a disproportionate increase in engine power and fuel consumption compared to increasing the size of the gas bags.[3] Moreover, the attachment of flying surfaces to the airship's envelope would require significant structural strengthening, with attendant weight gain.[2]

Conventional airships often make use of aerodynamic lift by using their elevators to set a nose-up attitude so that the main body of the airship provides some lift as it flies along; however, this is typically done to counteract minor out-of-trim conditions, and it is as likely that the nose may need to be pointed down to reduce lift.

Some Hybrid designs, such as the Lockheed Martin LMZ1M, use a flattened or multi-lobed hull to increase the aerodynamic lift obtainable. The aerodynamic approach is similar to that of a lifting body aircraft, although the airspeeds involved are much lower. Attainable dynamic-lift-to-drag ratios are significantly below those of efficient fixed wings, in part because induced drag increases with decreasing aspect ratio.[4] As a result, the lift comes at a higher drag penalty than when using wings. On the other hand, compared to a helicopter, the dynastat has better fuel efficiency within a given speed range.[2]

Another issue arises during take off and landing, when, in calmer conditions, the airspeed may be too low to provide sufficient aerodynamic lift.[5] For this reason, the dynastat is often conceived of as a STOL rather than VTOL aircraft, requiring a shorter runway than a conventional airplane.[2]

Rotastats
The rotastat obtains additional lift from powered rotors, similarly to a helicopter. Single-, twin-, and four-rotor designs have all been studied.

Early examples in the inter-war period included designs by Oehmichen and Zodiac. These used the rotors for vertical control only, with additional powered propellers for forward flight, as in the gyrocopter.[2]

In more recent times, the experimental Piasecki PA-97 "Helistat" attached four helicopter airframes to a helium blimp, while the SkyHook JHL-40 remains a project. Typically, aerostatic lift is sufficient to support the weight of the craft itself, while, when a load is carried, the rotors provide additional lift as required.

Gliding under gravity
If an airship does not have enough lift, it will sink under gravity. By angling the nose down, this can lead to a gliding forward flight just like a conventional glider. If an airship has excess lift, it will rise. By angling the nose up, this can also lead to forward movement. In this way, an airship which periodically alternates its buoyancy between positive and negative, while adjusting its attitude accordingly, can gain almost continuous aerodynamic forward thrust. Thus, flight proceeds in a leisurely vertical zig-zag pattern. Because no energy is consumed directly in creating thrust, the principle allows for flights of long duration, although at slow speeds. The proposed Hunt GravityPlane is a hybrid airship designed to take full advantage of gravity gliding.[6]

The principle also works underwater, where it is used operationally in the underwater glider.

Historically, this principle of aerial navigation, under the name of Wellenflug (wavy flight) was first formulated and experimentally tested in the year 1899 by Konstantin Danilewsky in Kharkiv, Ukraine, and described in detail in his book [7]

History
Early hybrids
Gliding under gravity dates from the period during and shortly after the American Civil War, when Solomon Andrews built two such airships. The first of these, Aereon, used three individual cigar shaped balloons rigged together in a flat plane; the second, Aereon #2, employed a single "lemon-shaped" balloon.[8] Andrews' Aereons were propelled by angling the balloons upward and dropping ballast, then process was then reversed with the balloons being angled downward and large quantities of lifting gas being vented.[9]

In 1905 Alberto Santos-Dumont conducted various experiments with his first airplane, the Santos-Dumont 14-bis, prior to attempting to fly it for the first time. These included hanging it from a steel cable and towing it, and subsequently hanging it beneath the envelope of a previously built airship (Number 14) - akin to learning to swim with "water wings". The combined craft was unusable, and was broken up, being referred to as "a monstrous hybrid".[10] After these "rehearsals" were completed, Santos-Dumont made the first public demonstration of a heavier-than-air aircraft in Europe.

In 1907 the British Army Dirigible No 1 (named Nulli Secundus) first flew. It used aerodynamic surfaces for attitude control in flight, and for its first flight was also fitted with large wings amidships. The wings were intended to aid stability rather than provide lift and were removed for all subsequent flights.[11][12] The use of dynamic lift by pitching the nose of the airship up or down was also recognised and practised on this airship.[13]

In June 1907 Alberto Santos Dumont constructed his No. 16, described by l'Aérophile as an appareil mixte. This had a 99 m3 (3,500 cu ft) envelope but was too heavy to fly without supplementary lift supplied by a 4 m (13 ft) wing surface. It was tested without success on 8 June 1907.[14]

Modern hybrids
The Aereon 26 was an aircraft which made its first flight in 1971. It was a small-scale prototype of the hybrid Airship Aereon Dynairship and part of the "TIGER" project. But it was never built due to lack of market for a hybrid airship.[15]

In 1984 the AeroLift CycloCrane helistat flew briefly.[citation needed]

The 1986 Piasecki PA-97 Helistat experimental design combined four helicopters with a blimp in an attempt to create a heavy-lift vehicle for forestry work. It broke up at the end of its first flight.

The SkyCat or "Sky Catamaran" vehicular technology is a hybrid aircraft amalgamation; a scale version at 12 meters called "SkyKitten", built by the Advanced Technologies Group Ltd, flew in 2000. The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) initiated the Walrus Hybrid Ultra Large Aircraft program in 2005, a technology development initiative focused on ultra heavy air lift technology explorations. The program was terminated in 2007.[citation needed]

In 2006, the Lockheed Martin P-791 underwent manned flight tests. It was an unsuccessful candidate for the military Long Endurance Multi-intelligence Vehicle program even though it was the only successful Hybrid Airship to have ever flown until 7 August 2016.[citation needed]

In 2008, Boeing announced that it was teaming up with SkyHook to develop a heavy duty lifting vehicle, the SkyHook JHL-40 Boeing subsequently shelved the project.[16]

The Hybrid Air Vehicles HAV 304 was built for the US Army Long Endurance Multi-intelligence Vehicle (LEMV) program. It flew successfully for 90 minutes in August 2012.[17][18][19] Following cancellation of the LEMV project, Hybrid Air Vehicles re-purchased the HAV 304 vehicle and brought it back to the UK. It has been refurbished and renamed the Airlander 10. On August 17, 2016 the Airlander 10 had its first successful test flight outside the Cardington Hangars at RAF Cardington. Chief Test Pilot Dave Burns said in a statement "It was privilege to fly the Airlander for the first time and it flew wonderfully. I’m really excited about getting it airborne. It flew like a dream."[20] Over 200 more flight hours are needed for full certification.

Other current projects
A Canadian start-up, Solar Ship Inc, is developing solar powered hybrid airships that can run on solar power alone. The idea is to create a viable platform that can travel anywhere in the world delivering cold medical supplies and other necessitates to locations in Africa and Northern Canada without needing any kind of fuel or infrastructure. The hope is that technology developments in solar cells and the large surface area provided by the hybrid airship are enough to make a practical solar powered aircraft. Some key features of the Solarship are that it can fly on aerodynamic lift alone without any lifting gas,[failed verification] and the solar cells along with the large volume of the envelope allow the hybrid airship to be reconfigured into a mobile shelter that can recharge batteries and other equipment.[21]

The Hunt GravityPlane (not to be confused with the ground-based gravity plane) is a proposed gravity-powered glider by Hunt Aviation in the USA.[22] It also has aerofoil wings, improving its lift-drag ratio and making it more efficient. The GravityPlane requires a large size in order to obtain a large enough volume-to-weight ratio to support this wing structure, and no example has yet been built.[6] Unlike a powered glider, the GravityPlane does not consume power during the climbing phase of flight. It does however consume power at the points where it changes its buoyancy between positive and negative values. Hunt claim that this can nevertheless improve the energy efficiency of the craft, similar to the improved energy efficiency of underwater gliders over conventional methods of propulsion.[6] Hunt suggest that the low power consumption should allow the craft to harvest sufficient energy to stay aloft indefinitely. The conventional approach to this requirement is the use of solar panels in a solar-powered aircraft. Hunt has proposed two alternative approaches. One is to use a wind turbine and harvest energy from the airflow generated by the gliding motion, the other is a thermal cycle to extract energy from the differences in air temperature at different altitudes.[6]
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Aug 27, 2021 10:54 am

Vehicle: Airship

90. Considering the inherent vulnerability of airships, the first thing I'd install is an escape hatch.

91. United States highway system cost five and three tenths of a megabux to construct, per kilometre, in the Fifties, rising to twenty one megabux per kilometre.

92. Considering the cost, and the possible low altitude, possibly the best option is just a parachute.

93. First class passengers could be issued with gravchutes at two kilostarbux each; economy class a basic parachute at two hundred fifty starbux.

94. I suppose you could still have a life vest under the seat.

95. Apparently, it's easier to break or accelerate at fast speed band or less.

96. Lifting body defaults to high speed band.

97. Invest ten percent of spaces for increasing to fast speed band (three to five hundred klix per hour), costing double default twenty six hundred starbux per space.

98. Can the lifting body go supersonic?

99. Swapping three quarters range for a further thee speed bands decrease range at technological level seven to fifteen hundred klix, but increases speed to between twelve and sixty hundred klix per hour.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Aug 27, 2021 11:30 am

Vehicle: Airship

100. Let's assume, at technological level seven, you do manage to hit six kiloklix per hour, at about four minutes after takeoff (or at least Mach one).

101. Maybe the material is made from asbestos.

102. Nominally, fifteen hundred klix would take a quarter of an hour at sixty klix.

103. For speeds greater than five times the speed of sound, M > 5, the flow is said to be hypersonic. At these speeds, some of the energy of the object now goes into exciting the chemical bonds which hold together the nitrogen and oxygen molecules of the air. At hypersonic speeds, the chemistry of the air must be considered when determining forces on the object. The Space Shuttle re-enters the atmosphere at high hypersonic speeds, M ~ 25. Under these conditions, the heated air becomes an ionized plasma of gas and the spacecraft must be insulated from the high temperatures.

104. Nominally, six kiloklix per hour would be a tad short of Mach five.

105. Supersonic conditions occur for Mach numbers greater than one, 1 < M < 3. Compressibility effects are important for supersonic aircraft, and shock waves are generated by the surface of the object. For high supersonic speeds, 3 < M < 5, aerodynamic heating also becomes very important for aircraft design.

106. A typical commercial passenger jet flies at a speed of about 400 – 500 knots which is around 460 – 575 mph when cruising at about 36,000ft. This is about Mach 0.75 – 0.85 or in other words, about 75-85% of the speed of sound. Generally speaking, the higher the aircraft flies, the faster it can travel. This high speed can only be achieved at high altitude, which is one of the reasons why commercial aircraft fly so high.

107. The typical cruising airspeed for a long-distance commercial passenger aircraft is approximately 880–926 km/h (475–500 kn; 547–575 mph).

108. Subsonic cruise would be 2'250 klix range; maximum speed subsonic would be three kiloklix range.

109. Supersonic eight times cost, 20'800 starbux per space; subsonic four times cost, 10'400 starbux per space; very fast twice cost, 5'200 starbux per space.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Aug 27, 2021 11:34 pm

Vehicle: Airships

110. Having covered a number of ways to abuse customization dirtside, we could take it, in dirigible form, to space.

111. The rigid airframe would not collapse, and you can clear out the gasbags, and have fourteen hundred cubic metres of volume.

112. At that point, you bolt in the engineering compartment, fuel tanks and the bridge, and hope that aluminum doesn't corrode in a jump bubble, though I suppose you could pull over the fuel condom over the framework, in place of the fabric.

113. Presumable, one hundred tonnes is either two or four hundred spaces.

114. Assuming four hundred spaces, the hull would cost one hundred twenty kilostarbux.

115. Stripping out speed and the fuel tanks, spaces are increased by eighty percent, to either three hundred sixty or seven hundred twenty spaces total.

116. Unless we're incorporating hammerspace, that's a potential one hundred eighty tonnes of volume.

117. If we structurally deinforce it, cost is now ninety kilostarbux for four hundred spaces default.

118. Though I kinda suspect that one hundred tonnes volume should be based on one space equals half a tonne, plus stripping out the integral engines and fuel tanks, which would be eighty percent.

119. Not sure what the remaining twenty percent would be.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sat Aug 28, 2021 12:11 am

Vehicle: Airships

120. Military budgets would make drones irrelevant, but I like to think that Confederation Navy doesn't tolerate wastage.

121. Confederation scoutships penetrate the atmosphere of a planet, and start throwing out autonomous airship drones out the back hatch, to provide widespread persistent ground coverage.

122. Not necessarily a military operation, it could be a planetary survey.

123. Could also be armed; unless filled with hydrogen, hard to see it as kamikaze drone.

124. Too bad there's no option to plaster solar panelling on the top.

125. That would allow near permanent surveillance.

126. The other role would be as an Amazing autonomous delivery drone.

127. Could be used as a rather low orbit communications network.

128. Comparatively, dirtside electronics appear to very favourably compare in cost to spacecraft's.

129. If disabled or shot down, it's easily replaced gives the response team an area to take an interest in.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Aug 29, 2021 10:47 am

Vehicle: Fusion Reactors Technological Level Ten and Nine

1. Twenty percent default spaces.

2. Minimum size ten spaces.

3. One hundred twenty spaces default equals sixty tonnes

4. Economy of scale sixty tonnes shipping equals one space quarter tonne volume.

5. Twenty percent of one hundred twenty spaces is twenty four spaces; twenty five percent is thirty spaces.

6. Thirty space basic fusion reactor costs four and a quarter megastarbux, and in theory, takes up seven and a half tonnes of spacecraft volume; twenty four space advanced fusion reactor costs four and four fifths megastarbux, and in theory, takes up six tonnes of spacecraft volume.

7. Early fusion technological level eight reactor costs half a megastarbux per tonne, seven and a half tonnes would be three and three quarters megastarbux, and produces seventy five power points, enough for twenty five smallcraft lasers.

8. Reduced size early fusion technological level nine reactor costs four and one eighths of a megastarbux, produces eighty two and a half power points, enough for twenty seven and a half smallcraft lasers.

9. Twenty percent reduction in size costs 3.3024 megastarbux, produces sixty six power points, enough for twenty two smallcraft lasers.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Aug 29, 2021 11:03 am

Vehicle: Fusion Reactors and Spacecraft Weapon Systems

Missile racks and sandcasters have no power point requirements.

They can be fixedly mounted, which also has no power point requirements.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Aug 29, 2021 11:46 am

Spacecraft: Fusion Reactors and Spacecraft Weapon Systems

Thirty tonnes, non gravitated hull, streamlined, nine tenths of a megastarbux, six power points.

Manoeuvre drive factor two, technological level ten, three fifths of a tonne, one and one fifth of a megastarbux, six power points.

Missile rack, mounted fixture, eight hundred fifty kilostarbux, one tonne magazine twelve missiles.

Single cockpit, one and a half tonnes, ten kilostarbux.

Computer/five, thirty kilostarbux; basic sensors.

One and one fifth tonne early fusion reactor, twelve power points, three fifths megastarbux.

Four and three tenths tonnes, twenty five and seven tenths cargo, additional magazines, and/or fuel tank.

3.59 megastarbux.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Aug 29, 2021 12:22 pm

Vehicle: Fusion Reactors Technological Level Ten and Nine

10. Heavy grav vehicle, one hundred twenty spaces, nine and three fifths megastarbux.

11. Fast speed band, minus one agility, two kiloklix range.

12. Crew station, one space.

13. Computer/one, five hundred starbux; communicator.

14. Basic sensors, one klick, five kilostarbux.

15. Advanced fusion reactor, twenty four spaces, four and four fifths megastarbux; dedicated to spacecraft missile rack.

16. Missile rack, three quarters of a megastarbux; theoretically one eight of a tonne, so one space.

17. Twelve missile magazine, four spaces.

18. Twenty nine spaces; ninety one spaces cargo.

19. 21'905'500 starbux.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Aug 29, 2021 12:40 pm

Vehicle: Sensors

Basic/five, range one kiloklix, no modifier, forty kilostarbux.

Improved/seven, range five kiloklix, modifier plus one, one hundred twenty kilostarbux.

Advanced/thirteen, range twenty five kiloklix, modifier plus two, two hundred kilostarbux.

Increased fidelity/six, every additional modifier plus one, double cost and add one space.

Basic/five, range one klick, five kilostarbux, is essentially emergency collision alarm.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Aug 29, 2021 1:00 pm

Vehicle: Sensors

Core has advanced/twelve sensors as requiring a quarter tonne, presumably one space.

Twenty five kiloklix is long range; five kiloklix somewhere in the middle of medium; and one kiloklix probably stays within adjacent.

Presumable, basic/five is radar.

Improved/seven could include lidar.

Advanced/thirteen could have a densitometer.

Visual has fine details upto twelve hundred fifty klix, and limited shape and structure to twenty five kiloklix; same with thermal.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Aug 29, 2021 9:41 pm

Spacecraft: Sensors

Basic/eight, lidar, radar, modifier minus four, free, virtual.

Civilian/nine, lidar, radar, modifier minus two, one power point, one tonne, three megastarbux.

Military/ten, lidar, radar, jammers, no modifier, two power points, two tonnes, four and one tenth megastarbux.

Improved/twelve, lidar radar, jammers, densitometer, modifier plus one, four power points, three tonnes, four and three tenths megastarbux.

Advanced/fifteen, lidar radar, jammers, densitometer, neural activity sensor, modifier plus two, six power points, five tonnes, five and three tenths megastarbux.

Enhanced signal processing/thirteen, modifier plus four, immune to jamming of lesser signal processing systems; two power points, two tonnes, eight megastarbux.

Distributed arrays/eleven, electromagnetic, active radar, active lidar detect objects at distant range at minimal information; passive radar, passive lidar at long range at minimal information; triple tonnage, triple cost, double power points.

Optionally, extended arrays/eleven for sub five kilotonne spaceships; cannot manoeuvre or jump, modifier plus two to enemy detection; triple tonnage, triple cost, triple power points.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Aug 29, 2021 9:51 pm

Spacecraft: Probe Drones

Probe drones/nine, planetary survey, space debris survey, communications relay, one fifth tonne, hundred kilostarbux; endurance unknown.

Advanced probe drones/twelve, technological level twelve based sensors, planetary survey, space debris survey, communications relay, one fifth tonne, hundred sixty kilostarbux; endurance unknown.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Mon Aug 30, 2021 12:26 pm

Vehicles: Van Life

Light ground vehicle, twenty spaces, ten hull points, fifteen kilostarbux.

Technological level eleven, fast speed, six hundred klix range, starting protection three.

Driver's seat, passenger's seat; basic control system, improved communications system/eight, computer/one, basic navigations system/five, basic sensors/five, entertainment system, fire extinguisher, fresher, galley, stateroom. wet bar, refrigerator, stateroom.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sat Sep 04, 2021 10:06 pm

Vehicles: Off road speed

If I recall correctly, the fastest speed a tank can go cross country is supposedly thirty miles an hour, otherwise it will bounce all of it's components apart, and make the crew unhappy with their life choices.

If you want to go faster, I would suppose you'd have to install inertial compensators, for both the crew and the components.

I would suppose tis would apply to a greater or lesser degree to other ground vehicles.

Any ground vehicle going off-road will suffer modifier minus two to all checks to control it and its maximum speed is reduced by two Speed Bands.

Thirty miles is somewhat in the area of fifty klix per hour, so that's very slow upper limit, or the lower margin of slow, two speed bands up would be medium or high.

Technological level seven default speed is medium for ground vehicles; light vehicle/nine defaults to high, light vehicle/eleven defaults to fast; heavy vehicle/eleven defaults tp high.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Sun Sep 05, 2021 9:24 pm

Image

IRAQ WAR - HOW THE US MILITARY ADAPTED TO THREATS - BBC NEWS

Take a look at our data visualization and find out how the American military adapted it's tactics in the face of changing threats from their enemies in Iraq. The Americans reacted each time by enhancing and upgrading their equipment. But the military forces were often criticised for the slow pace at which they adopted these measures.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WSQI7aVIgo



1. Turns out to be rather timeless.

2. Adequate body armour.

3. Concentrate on the torso (and probably the head).

4. Flame proof or retardant uniforms.

5. Flight suits or cloth armour?

6. I think our vehicles with default speed settings are mobile enough.
Condottiere
Warlord Mongoose
Posts: 9740
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Sep 07, 2021 1:49 pm

Image

Biggest Plane - The Future An-225 Concept!

This HyperTransport plane can carry more than a 747, fly further than any other cargo aircraft, and is far more fuel-efficient - this is the futuristic cargo competitor to the AN-225 built by both Boeing and Airbus.

In today's video, lets' explore the future of cargo planes, what would a future heavy-lift aircraft look like, and why it may never be built.

Let us jump in and if by the end of the video you feel like I've entertained you with this What If, then a like is appreciated.

The Antonov An-225 is the world's largest most powerful cargo plane. It can carry heavy and bulky items, like a generator or a mining drill, across the world. It was even essentially in transporting the engines for the Boeing 777X to the airframe across North America.

But for all its usefulness, it has some flaws.

First, the fact is there is only one An-225 in existence, with a 2nd airframe hidden half-built in a warehouse. This plane was originally built for the soviet space shuttle, and it was never really intended to be the defacto heavy lifter the world needs today. It is relatively slow, doesn't have a great range fully loaded, and burns a ton of fuel to get where it needs to go.

Simply put, it is old technology, its operators charge a huge premium to the market and don't have any of the versatility we have seen from more modern platforms like the 747-8 series - which is both a freighter and a fantastic passenger aircraft.

That leads us to the topic of today's video, what would it look like if Boeing and Airbus built their own version of the An-225?

This plane would be modern heavy-lift aircraft utilizing the very best new technologies, with the learnings from other passenger and cargo airframes like the A380 and 747, and with the combined efforts of both aerospace firms - a truly world class giga-flying machine.

This plane would be called the Proteus, after the greek god of the same name who served Poseidon and was capable of changing his shape at will to serve the task at hand. A fitting description don't you think.

This beast would have six high-bypass engines, such as the GE9X found on the Boeing 777X, or a future derivative, and would have a range greater than that of the AN-225 and at least equal to the 747-8F. With better engines and using learnings in fuel efficiency, we would expect this aircraft to have a load distance greater than 4,120 nmi (7,630 km).

Its unique design would afford plenty of advantages, with a double tail at the end to allow more space onboard, something that we have already seen utilized by the world's largest plane the Stratolaunch. Its engines and wings would use fuel-saving technology derived by the 787 series, such as saw-teeth" or "chevrons" on the back of the engine casing, to help reduce noise generated from the operation of the engine. The wings would use racked wingtip technology like on the Boeing 777X, to reduce fuel burn while cruising.

When it comes to cargo-carrying capacity, this is where it gets interesting. This aircraft would be able to load in full containers, like those found on trains, trucks and boats, and fill in the missing link found in intermodal delivery channels, directly into the cargo cabin using its own onboard lift technology.. This would mean that while it wouldn't be as long as the 747 and not suitable to tall items - like aircraft wings, but it would be more flexible for boxy items like giant turbines or engines.

We would require this aircraft to carry at least 200 tonnes, or around 450,600 lb, much like the AN-225. Likely we won't be able to carry much more, but the range will be extended with a full load on board. For comparison, the An-225 carrying 200 tonnes can only fly 4,000 km or 2,159 nautical miles.

There is even a possibility to turn it into a combi version with passengers onboard.

This leads us to the next point - the potential military applications. Such a heavy lift aircraft might actually be highly sought after by military forces around the world, able to carry tanks and other heavy military equipment's where needed.

The big issue with cargo carriers is two-fold. For one, cargo companies don't really care so much about fuel-saving and lowing the cost per kilo, because they are more than happy to simply increase the rate that they charge companies for transport. And they don't really care about being competitive, because where else are you going to go?

The second issue is the availability of other platforms. There are very few jobs that the An-225 can perform that other aircraft cant, and there is a lot of other aircraft.

For example, we have yet to see the next generation of cargo carriers, such as A350, 787s, 777xs, and more converted for cargo operations.

We also need to consider its market potential - or lack thereof.

But when the An-225 finally retires, the world is going to need a new heavy aircraft, and a concept plane like this Proteus HyperTransport will be waiting.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=reIxB0bIARM



1. Conceivably a spacecraft hull.

2. Niche market cargo capability.

3. External cargo.

4. Container cargo.

5. Internal crane.

6. Passenger cargo combination.

7. Dual use.

8. Not cost sensitive, like graphic cards.

9. Minimal capital investment, operating costs may be linked to (non) sensitivity, since it would be passed directly on to customers.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 64 guests