Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Discuss the Traveller RPG and its many settings
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Sep 07, 2021 1:54 pm

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490mm cannonballs at 4km/s vs AFV turret

3 x 490 mm cast iron cannonballs at 4 km/s vs AFV turret

Armor inserts (spaced steel armor)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJGVrXfKyow



Mass drivers and railguns.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Sep 07, 2021 2:31 pm

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How Australia Keeps Losing Wars To Animals

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MXKgLaNnKI



Cats and pigs in general; snakes in Guam.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Sep 14, 2021 11:48 am

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The Most INSANE Tank Concept EVER | Cursed by Design

In a recent episode we took a trip back to the 1950s into the works of a man by the name of Frank Tinsley. Due to the interest shown from that first video we’ll be doing it again this week as we take a look at probably the most insane tank concept I have ever seen. Join me as we take a look at the crazy vehicle known as the baby assault tank.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_I5lBwzfQ0



1. California's Big Squirt.

2. All Terrain Buggy, armoured.

3. Overarmed.

4. Probably simpler to try a hovercraft, or even gravitational motors.

5. I understand the concept, but you could send in tracked or wheeled drones
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Sep 14, 2021 9:26 pm

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Burgess Folding Shotgun

Andrew Burgess was an extremely prolific gun designer who gets very little recognition today. One of has particularly interesting weapons was a pump-action, folding shotgun. Because Spencer already had a patent on the use of the forearm as the pump, Burgess designed his gun to use a sliding sleeve on the wrist of the stock as the pump handle. The guns were well made, and the company Burgess set up to manufacture them was bought out and shut down by Winchester to reduce competition with their 1893/1897 pump action shotgun. As a result not many were made, and very very few of the folding models. This one is in fantastic shape, and also comes with an excellent leather belt holster made for carrying it folded.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXvmGtLYwKA



Image
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Sep 15, 2021 3:23 pm

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Firearms Expert Reacts To Necromunda: Hired Gun’s Guns

Jonathan Ferguson, a weapons expert and Keeper of Firearms & Artillery at the Royal Armouries, breaks down the future weaponry of Necromunda: Hired Gun, including the franchise’s iconic Boltgun, the Ironfist Stubgun, and a rifle called the Vapanther.

In the latest video in the Firearm Expert Reacts series, Jonathan Ferguson--a weapons expert and Keeper of Firearms & Artillery at the Royal Armouries--breaks down the guns of Necromunda: Hired Gun, and compares them to their real-life counterparts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CTGVSBS97M



1. Iron sights, in case of electromagnetic pulse.

2. Practicality questionable, but maybe throwaway cylinder revolver speedloader made of hardened plastic.

3. Close up and personal; at this point, should be mini grenades.

4. Road Warrior; arrr, me hearties.

5. Skulls for the Skull Throne!

6. Heat sink; backstop?

7. Rocket propelled grenade launcher.

8. Blue balled equipped trooper.

9. Holographic sights.

10. Supposedly, low rate of fire heavy machine gun.

11. If you can have selective ammunition, like a Sandman's revolver, or a Judge's Lawgiver.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Fri Sep 17, 2021 12:39 pm

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Firearms Expert Reacts To Aliens: Fireteam Elite’s Guns

Jonathan Ferguson, a weapons expert and Keeper of Firearms & Artillery at the Royal Armouries, breaks down the sci-fi arsenal of Aliens: Fireteam Elite, including the legendary Smartgun, the OCAP-91 Volcan flamethrower and, of course, the iconic M4A1 Pulse Rifle.

In the latest video in the Firearm Expert Reacts series, Jonathan Ferguson--a weapons expert and Keeper of Firearms & Artillery at the Royal Armouries--breaks down the guns of Aliens: Fireteam Elite and compares them to their real-life inspirations.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5YylyfzXYQ



1. Spray resistant; prey resistant.

2. Easy rider.

3. High explosive armour piercing shells.

4. Would have thought caseless, and Siri counting.

5. Grenade launcher was twenty millimeter, as I recall.

6. Adjust the rate of fire?

7. If scout rifle concept, then the idea is situational awareness at medium range.

8. I like break open shotguns, but maybe not when facing a xenomorph hive.

9. Kill it with fire.

10. Personal defence weapon?

11. Heavy accel rifle.

12. Unless large numbers buzz sawing xenomoph carapace, maybe less than ideal.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Sep 21, 2021 12:44 pm

Solomani Front: Corporate Bodies and Non State Organizations

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1. Wag the dog.

2. Sinecures.

3. Megacorporations - Aeroflot.

4. No corporation may field more power or influence than the Party.

5. Tax incentives and (relatively) new markets.

6. Public private partnerships; sponsorships.

7. Delgado - defence contractor; nuclear dampers and meson screens must have hefty net profit margins.

8. Archaeological relics and antiquities smuggling.

9. GSbAG - Terra three (star)ports; luxury yachts and courier specialists.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Sep 21, 2021 10:14 pm

Solomani Front: Corporate Bodies and Non State Organizations

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10. General Products - Image

11. Image

12. Hortalez et Cie - Image

13. Instellarms - Image

14. Image
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Sep 21, 2021 10:33 pm

Solomani Front: Corporate Bodies and Non State Organizations

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15. Ling Standard Products - Image

16. Makhidkarum - Image

17. Naasirka - Image

18. Image

19. Sharushid - Image
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Tue Sep 21, 2021 11:01 pm

Solomani Front: Corporate Bodies and Non State Organizations

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20. Sternmetal Horizons - Image

21. SuSAG - Image

22. Image

23. Image

24. Image
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Sep 22, 2021 11:56 am

Mechanical counterpressure suit

The Space Activity Suit developed by Paul Webb and built under a NASA project. The image shows the complete multi-layer suit and positive-pressure helmet, lacking only the backpack. (taken c. 1971)
A mechanical counterpressure (MCP) suit, partial pressure suit, direct compression suit, or space activity suit (SAS) is an experimental spacesuit which applies stable pressure against the skin by means of skintight elastic garments. The SAS is not inflated like a conventional spacesuit: it uses mechanical pressure, rather than air pressure, to compress the human body in low-pressure environments. Development was begun by NASA and the Air Force in the late 1950s and then again in the late 1960s, but neither design was used. Research is under way at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on a "Bio-Suit" System which is based on the original SAS concept.[1]

Background
The human body can briefly survive exposure to the hard vacuum of space unprotected,[2] despite contrary depictions in some popular science fiction. Human skin does not need to be protected from vacuum and is gas-tight by itself. Human flesh expands to about twice its size in such conditions, giving the visual effect of a body builder rather than an overfilled balloon. This can be counteracted through mechanical counter-pressure from a suitably designed garment. Consciousness is retained for up to 15 seconds as the effects of oxygen starvation set in. Counteracting this requires a helmet to contain breathing gases and protect the ears and eyes.[3] These effects have been confirmed through various accidents in very high altitude conditions, outer space, and training vacuum chambers.[4][2]

Cooling
Cooling of the astronaut with an SAS is generally achieved with evaporation from body perspiration which is emitted from the suit in all directions. Water, salts, and proteins can deposit on optics and other sensitive surfaces causing damage or degradation. This can limit the usefulness of an SAS. For the inflated spacesuits used on the space shuttle, International Space Station, and the Apollo program, cooling was achieved in the Primary Life Support System by sublimation of water in a vacuum.

Designs
Mauch
In 1959 Hans Mauch was working on "breathable" undergarments for the Mercury space suit when he came up with the idea of a way to build a mechanical counterpressure design. The Mauch team noticed that closed-cell foams, which trap gas within their structure, expand when outside pressure is lowered. By containing the foam within a non-expanding outer layer, it would place increasing pressure on the body as the pressure lowered. This appeared to allow for a design that would offer far better mobility than the almost-rigid Mercury design.[5]

Late in 1959 Mauch Laboratories was granted a contract by the US Air Force to develop a working model, as part of the Air Force's secret X-20 Dynasoar efforts. The program ran until 1962, during which time NASA had joined the effort. The suit was built with a layer of foam sandwiched between two layers of fabric, the inner against the wearer's skin (or undergarments) to provide mechanical support, and the outer providing containment. A separate, and bulky, helmet provided pressure and breathing gases. Like the undergarments that Mauch was developing for Mercury, thermal control was provided by direct sweat transpiration through the fabric. The resulting suit was about as bulky as the original Mercury design, excluding the large helmet.[5]

Extended vacuum testing was carried out successfully, but the suit proved to have less mobility than expected and further development was dropped.[5]

Webb
The introduction of improved fabrics led to Paul Webb's concept for a new way to build an SAS.[6] Further work was contracted in order to test various design concepts. Between 1968 and 1971 ten designs of increasing sophistication were built, leading eventually to a series of successful tests in vacuum chambers. The longest test was two hours and forty-five minutes.

The tests were successful: the practicality of a mechanical counter pressure spacesuit was demonstrated conclusively. The energy needed to move about was considerably less than conventional designs, which was a major improvement for long-duration spacewalks. Tests of punctures showed that up to a square millimeter of skin could be directly exposed to vacuum for extended periods with no permanent effect. A similar puncture in a conventional suit would result in a loss of pressure and breathing air. It weighed half as much as the primary pressure suit worn by NASA astronauts for Project Apollo, the A7L.

A number of problems also turned up, primarily related to the problem of keeping the suit in strong mechanical contact at every point on the body. Concavities or small folds in the fabric could lead to fluid pooling in the gaps; the groin area proved extremely difficult to tailor successfully. To correct this, small pads of polyurethane foam were inserted into concavities and were successful in most problem areas. The suits had to be tailored to each individual, although the same was true of all space suits of the era. The largest difficulty was donning and removing the suit. In order to effectively provide the minimum pressure of 0.3 bars (4.4 psi) necessary for human physiology, the suit had to be extremely tight-fitting, making donning and doffing a highly strenuous task.

In 1971, Webb, along with James F. Annis, published their findings in a report.[7] The report remained positive, and the researchers felt that further improvements were possible. Quoting the Report:

In conclusion, the SAS at its present stage of development will protect man from the effects of the vacuum environment, in a garment, which permits improved mobility and natural body movements. Physiologically the approach is sound, and although there remain many problems to be solved, they are principally mechanical in nature. It has been suggested that solution of the mechanical problems, combined with careful tailoring based upon biomechanical analysis, plus the development of specific elastic fabrics, could eventually lead to a space qualified version of the SAS.

The original SAS design was based on two new fabrics: a type of "powernet" (or "girdle fabric") for high-tension areas, and an elastic bobbinet weave for lower-tension areas. Both were based on a heavy elastic warp thread with a much less elastic weft thread to form a netting. The terms warp and weft are used loosely here, as the material was not woven using traditional means. Powernet used Spandex cord as the warp with nylon cord as the weft, allowing movement primarily along the warp axis. Bobbinet used cotton-wrapped rubber warp and nylon or Dacron weft, and was flexible in both directions. The cotton wrapping limited the maximum stretch to 200% of the rest length. The amount of over-pressure bobbinet could create was about 0.02 bars (0.29 psi) over the torso, the largest volume, and up to 0.053 bars (0.77 psi) over smaller radius curves on the wrist and ankles. Powernet could produce about 0.067 bars (0.97 psi) even on the torso. A minimum of 0.17 bars (2.5 psi) is needed for normal breathing.

Multiple layers and patches of the two materials were used to control the overall mechanical pressure around the body. Starting at the skin, a "slip layer" of light powernet was used to allow the outer layers to slide over the skin without binding. Under this layer a number of foam pads were placed on various concavities on the body to keep them in contact with the suit. On top of this was the counter-pressure bladder, part of the breathing system. On top of this were up to six additional layers of powernet over the trunk with bobbinet arms and legs, or all-bobbinet garments covering the trunk only. The garments were put on like a normal bodysuit with a large zipper closing the front, with additional drawstrings at some points to help close the garment. Zippers on alternating layers were offset.

The positive-pressure breathing system consisted of three main portions: the pressurized helmet, the breathing bladder, and the tankage system in a backpack. The bladder and helmet were connected together to pump air out of the bladder and over the torso when the user breathed in, reducing the amount of pressure on the user's chest. The helmet was secured by means of a non-elastic garment of Nomex cloth which wrapped around the chest and under the arms, and by the elastic layers above and below it.

MIT Bio-Suit
The Bio-Suit is an experimental space activity suit under construction at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology at the direction of professor Dava Newman, with support from the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts. Similar to the SAS in concept, the BioSuit applies advances in engineering and measurement[which?] to produce a simplified version of the SAS design.[8]

Newman has worked extensively in biomechanics, especially in the field of computerized measurement of human movement. As with gas-filled suits, Newman has used the principle of "lines of non-extension", a concept originated by Arthur Iberall in work dating back to the late 1940s, to place the tension elements along lines of the body where the skin does not stretch during most normal movements.

The primary structure of the BioSuit is built by placing elastic cords along the lines of non-extension. Thus, whatever pressure they provide will be constant even as the wearer moves. In this way, they can control the mechanical counter-pressure the suit applies. The rest of the suit is then built up from spandex lying between the primary pressure cords. The Bio-Suit team has thus far[when?] constructed a number[clarification needed] of lower leg prototypes using different materials, including nylon-spandex, elastic, and urethane-painted foam.[9] In one experimental design, kevlar fabric was used between cords for areas where the expansion was limited. At least one full-body suit has been constructed for Newman, which she has worn for numerous photo-ops; it is unknown if the entire suit meets the same counter-pressure standards that the lower-leg prototypes were designed for. Each suit has to be custom tailored for the wearer, but the complexity of this task is reduced through the use of whole-body laser scans.

The result is a one-layer version of the SAS; it is lighter than the original and more flexible, allowing more natural motion and decreasing the energy cost of motion. Versions of portions of the BioSuit have consistently reached 0.25 bars (3.6 psi), and the team is currently[when?] aiming for 0.3 bars (4.4 psi). As mechanical counter-pressure has proven difficult for small joints such as those in the hands, the BioSuit baseline design uses gas-filled gloves and boots, in addition to a gas-filled helmet.[10]

A later variant of the biosuit employs heat-activated shape-memory alloy (SMA) coils.[11] In this design the suit fits loosely on the body when initially donned. When a power module is attached, the spring-like coils in the suit contract to form-fit the suit to the body. The design of the coil was further defined in an article in the journal IEEE/ASME: Transactions on Mechatronics.[12] As of 2008, the Biosuit reportedly had the potential to be ready for use in Mars missions in the near future.[13][14]

As of 2019, an additional improvement has been made with the addition of nucleated boron tubes,[clarification needed] which can shield the wearer of the suit from the radiation present in space and on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars. According to Cathy Lewis of the National Air and Space Museum, "It may not be the next suit, but it will be one of the subsequent suits", indicating that development remains active and focused on future Moon and Mars missions.[15]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechanica ... ssure_suit
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Sep 22, 2021 12:00 pm

Skintight spacesuits

The potential for greater mobility and simpler operation with a skintight spacesuit, generally referred to as a space activity suit or mechanical counterpressure suit, make this type of space suit an attractive choice for fiction, where flexibility of use can be a boon to plot development.

Some space story writers whose work mentions flexible skin-tight spacesuits include:

The spacesuits in early Buck Rogers comics seem to be skintight.
Jerry Pournelle, who has been extensively involved in analysis and design of space technology systems. Pournelle envisions a layered design where the inner flexible suit can be overlain with various kinds of thermal protection or armor, for protection against meteoroids or space battle damage, in the same way a flak jacket protects the occupants of a warplane. Skintight spacesuits first appeared in recent science fiction in Pournelle's novel Exiles To Glory in 1977.
A. Bertram Chandler.
Grant Callin's Saturnalia and A Lion on Tharthee feature 'micropore suits' which use minute gas bubbles in foam rather than mechanical tension to provide counterpressure in vacuum.
Stephen Baxter's Manifold Trilogy, notably Manifold: Time, covers the technical aspects of using a skintight suit for short EVAs, including the need to don the suit without creasing to prevent embolisms.
In Larry Niven's Known Space, skintights are the preferred type of spacesuit used by belters in the 22nd and 23rd century. They often decorated them with elaborate (and expensive) torso paintings as a form of heraldry. Pournelle's design in particular is featured in some of Niven's later Ringworld novels.
Victor Koman in Kings of the High Frontier.
Kim Stanley Robinson used suits called "Walkers" that work on a similar principle for Martian surface exploration in the Mars Trilogy novels.
Roger Leloup in the adventures of Yoko Tsuno
In Spider and Jeanne Robinson's novel Stardance (1979) they played a significant role.
Skinsuits feature rather prominently in the Honorverse books by David Weber.
In EA Games's Dead Space series, engineers and miners use an airtight suit called a RIG when working in the vacuum of space or an otherwise unsafe environment.
In L. Neil Smith's novel The Venus Belt, the protagonist describes in some detail a skin-tight Smartsuit which is capable of furnishing not only life support in various types of hostile environments, but also limited medical treatment for the wearer. The suit also functions as a powerful wearable computer, with the circuitry, displays, and controls integrated into the fabric of the suit. In the novel, the suit is, as a matter of tradition, included in the price of a space-liner ticket to Ceres. The character notes that a properly fitted Smartsuit leaves the wearer feeling "completely naked ... a testament to the makers' art". Most spacefarers live in their Smartsuits for indefinite periods, as the suit can handle waste management and hygiene for the wearer.
In Elecia White's novel Pony Up, the protagonist utilized a next-generation NASA "skinsuit" during a protracted space walk.
Steven Gould, in his 2013 novel Exo, the fourth in his Jumper series, centered the ambitions of his young protagonist, Cent, on the use of a mechanical counterpressure suit to allow her to teleport into space.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Sep 22, 2021 12:10 pm

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The Most Important Device in the Universe - Blinking Tubes Without Function New Compilation (Part 1)

This Device has been spotted in numerous science-fiction movies and tv shows.
It is the ultimate re-used prop, and there is not a single of its numerous appearances where its purpose would be explained or hinted at.
The prop is described as "dual generators with rotating neon lights inside an acrylic tube; light-controlled panel with knobs and buttons." or simply as "blinking tubes without function".

The first time we see it is in the Regula lab in "Star Trek II Wrath of Khan". They are also visible in the Enterprise-A's shuttlebay in "Star Trek V"

They also appear in a number of Star Trek Episodes:

TNG: "Datalore"
TNG: "Suddenly Human"
TNG: "The Quality of Life"
VOY: "Retrospect"
VOY: "Inside Man"
Finally the prop can be seen in Soong's hideout as well as on the research station in ENT: "Cold Station 12".
it appears in the background of various science labs in "Lower Decks" , in cartoon form.

The tubes appear in other science fiction series and movies as well, such as

"Buck Rogers in the 25th Century" (1979)
"V" (the 1983 miniseries),
"Otherworld" (1985)
"The Last Starfighter" 1984
"Knight Rider"
"Star Crystal" 1986
"The Incredible Hulk Returns" (1988 TV movie),
"The Flash: The deadly Nightshade" (1990) ,
"Alien Nation"
"Austin Powers The Spy Who Shagged Me"
"Airplane II" (with William Shatner, who would again encounter it in Star Trek V: The Final Frontier which he directed and starred in.
It also appeared in "Lois & Clark" episode 2x08 with Denis Crosby.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phPp5oYnps0



More Clips of The Most Important Device in the Universe - Blinking Tubes Without Function (Part 2)

This Device has been spotted in numerous science-fiction movies and tv shows.
It is the ultimate re-used prop, and there is not a single of its numerous appearances where its purpose would be explained or hinted at.
The prop is described as "dual generators with rotating neon lights inside an acrylic tube; light-controlled panel with knobs and buttons." or simply as "blinking tubes without function".

The first time we see it is in the Regula lab in "Star Trek II Wrath of Khan". They are also visible in the Enterprise-A's shuttlebay in "Star Trek V"

They also appear in a number of Star Trek Episodes:

TNG: "Datalore"
TNG: "Suddenly Human"
TNG: "The Quality of Life"
VOY: "Retrospect"
VOY: "Inside Man"
Finally the prop can be seen in Soong's hideout as well as on the research station in ENT: "Cold Station 12".
it appears in the background of various science labs in "Lower Decks" , in cartoon form.

The tubes appear in other science fiction series and movies as well, such as

"Buck Rogers in the 25th Century" (1979)
"V" (the 1983 miniseries),
"Otherworld" (1985)
"The Last Starfighter" 1984
"Knight Rider"
"Star Crystal" 1986
"The Incredible Hulk Returns" (1988 TV movie),
"The Flash: The deadly Nightshade" (1990) ,
"Alien Nation"
"Austin Powers The Spy Who Shagged Me"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxiPuVt77W8



Dual Lights Without Function on Star Trek Lower Decks - The Most Important Device in the Universe !

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkU0yMlBzJ8
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Sep 22, 2021 12:52 pm

Solomani Front: Corporate Bodies and Non State Organizations

Paragraph

25. Transstar - Image

26. Image

27. Image

28.Tukera Lines - Image

29. Zirunkariish - Image
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Sep 23, 2021 12:27 pm

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Why Algae Could be the Plastic of the Future

Why Algae Could be the Plastic of the Future.

As revolutionary as plastics were for changing the course of manufacturing forever, 91% of plastics aren't recycled. There has to be a better solution. In a previous video I covered how mycelium fungus may be a viable plastic replacement, but there's another solution starting to bloom ... Algae. And it's showing up in a place you might not expect ... your feet. What if I told you we could wear plastic-free flip flops made from algae?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oy9NRjZQK10



1. Move over Crocs; multistyle configurable footwear.

2. Algae could be three dee printing material.

3. Flip flops - carbon footprint.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Mon Sep 27, 2021 11:28 am

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I review the AK-50

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHPyLu5PWtg



1. Don't do this at home; or anywhere.

2. Do it yourself when faced with powered armour.

3. Explains all those game mechanics regarding time, effort and treasure when building customized machinery.

4. Also, magic spells.

5. Devil, long spoon.

6. Shorter barrel, faster burning propellant.

7. Duct tape.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Mon Sep 27, 2021 12:02 pm

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When the Soviet Navy Lost 16 Admirals in a Single Accident: The Tu-104 Crash at Pushkin

The plane crash at Pushkin airfield on February 7, 1981 became the very last accident in the Tupolev Tu-104 history, after which they were permanently retired from service. But the main reason the disaster at Pushkin airfield went down in history was because this single crash had almost entirely beheaded the Soviet Pacific Fleet. That day, in just a few seconds, the Soviet Navy lost 16 admirals and generals, including the commander of the Pacific Fleet admiral Emil Spiridonov.

Chapters:
00:00 - 7 February 1981
02:48 - Pushkin
05:06 - War?
07:23 - Main Suspect
09:17 - Black Box
13:11 - "Sausage Plane"
16:54 - Printing Paper
21:40 - Serving on Duty

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZU1f47SC_A8



1. Decapitation.

2. Career ladder.

3. Or, unauthorized passengers and undeclared household appliances; paper rolls.

4. You have to keep in mind, smuggling toilet paper rolls on external cargo mounts still count as volume.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Sep 29, 2021 12:14 pm

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Avatar: RDA Gunships (Scorpion & Dragon) | Aircraft Breakdown

Spacedock returns to Pandora for a look at the Scorpion and Dragon Attack Gunships.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcNwTBbyLoM



1. Hardened.

2. Have one squadron fly High Guard.

3. Mini helicarrier.

4. Denser atmosphere? I thought it was lighter.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Thu Sep 30, 2021 10:40 am

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Are there SHOTGUNS in Star Wars? (...why are they not common?)

Are there shotguns in Star Wars canon or legends lore? If so, why are shotguns not more common? I'll look at that and more on EckhartsLadder for today's Star Wars Lore video!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OKDyESVqNfc



Bomb–Pumped Torpedo: This torpedo contains a small nuclear device that is detonated prior to impact in order to charge a laser. Due to the ‘stand-off’ nature of its attack, point defence against this torpedo suffers dice modifier minus two. Defences that work against lasers can be used against this torpedo.
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Re: Ship's Locker: Out of the Closet

Postby Condottiere » Wed Oct 06, 2021 11:05 am

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Honest Trailers | Star Wars Visions

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4pN5wxPTcg



1. Outsourced.

2. IP theft.

3. Chinese whispers.

4. High ground.


Image

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