Narn before the Centauri

Discuss Mongoose RPGs here, such as the OGL rulebooks, Jeremiah, Armageddon 2089 and Macho Women with Guns
PottsBr

Narn before the Centauri

Postby PottsBr » Wed Apr 28, 2004 6:08 pm

I think I'm seeing a discrepancy in the Narn history. I haven't gotten the Narn Fact Book yet, but according to the synopsis online, the Narn were "Hunter-Gatherers" before the Centauri came. That's probably an exageration as they were a agrarian people.

This doesn't agree with the very first episode of Babylon 5. G'Kar brings to the council's attension that Raghesh 3 was a colony of Narn before the Centauri occupation. This would mean that Narn was already a space fairing culture before the Centauri conquered them. Not only did they have space craft, but were plying interstellar space and establishing colonies of their own.

They may have been a peaceful, agrarian race, as it has been said, but they were not primitives. This becomes even more obvious when we look at the map from Into the fire. Raghesh is nowhere near Narn. It is several jumps away and actually much closer to Centauri Prime along the jump routes.
Enlightened Bystander
Stoat
Posts: 87
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 9:05 am
Location: Liverpool, UK

Postby Enlightened Bystander » Fri Apr 30, 2004 9:02 am

The Narns were maybe two or three decades in advance of our present level. Ragesh was actually colonised by Sleeper ship that was launched just before the Centauri Invasion.
Halcyon

Postby Halcyon » Fri Apr 30, 2004 9:56 am

Not to mention that the Narn had had alien visitors before.
nitflegal
Mongoose
Posts: 128
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2004 9:13 pm

Re: Narn before the Centauri

Postby nitflegal » Fri Apr 30, 2004 12:57 pm

PottsBr wrote:I think I'm seeing a discrepancy in the Narn history. I haven't gotten the Narn Fact Book yet, but according to the synopsis online, the Narn were "Hunter-Gatherers" before the Centauri came. That's probably an exageration as they were a agrarian people.
(Snip)
They may have been a peaceful, agrarian race, as it has been said, but they were not primitives. This becomes even more obvious when we look at the map from Into the fire. Raghesh is nowhere near Narn. It is several jumps away and actually much closer to Centauri Prime along the jump routes.
I've always kind of laughed at that. This "peaceful, agrarian race" had a centuries old tradition of blood debts and oathes, institutionalized assassins, swords with a pedigreed history, etc. Of ocurse, since it came from G'Kar in the first season and we all know that he would NEVER lie or shade the truth, it must be correct. . . :? :wink:

They may well have been primitive. However, somewhere in their recent past they sure as heck weren't peaceful! It would be ironic if they finally got their fecal matter together and made for a peaceful society, sending out colony ships and what have you, right before the Centauri got there.

Matt
Last edited by nitflegal on Mon May 03, 2004 12:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Prophetsteve
Weasel
Posts: 39
Joined: Mon Oct 13, 2003 5:06 pm
Location: Canada

Postby Prophetsteve » Mon May 03, 2004 2:53 am

The one thing to keep in mind is that Narn culture doesn't necessarily have to be unified.

Its quite possible that a sizeable faction or nation(s) of Narn were peaceful agrarian people but that there were nations or groups of Narn more warlike and had things like ancestral swords and assassin guilds.

And as it was said, it could be "revisionist" history on the part of G'Kar. After all, its nothing new to have someone to focus on some aspects of history to make a point while downplaying or ignoring aspects that would conflict with their view.

Then it could also be that Narn had a violent past but had largely moved past their bloody ways, but that elements of their violent past still remained - elements that may have been ceremonial and traditional until the occupation, when they became important again.
nitflegal
Mongoose
Posts: 128
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2004 9:13 pm

Postby nitflegal » Mon May 03, 2004 12:43 pm

The one thing to keep in mind is that Narn culture doesn't necessarily have to be unified.
Actually, if they were as primitive as depicted, it would be difficult to see them as being totally unifed. Until there is a racial endeavor that needs the resources of an entire planet (space navies, for example) it would seem more likely to have some factionalization. Certainly the Narn seem combative enought to make it seem likely that they weren't totally unified. Besides, it makes a better story if the Centauri occupation caused those old differences to be dropped and unified the Narn against them. Since we are told that the Kha-Ri were around before the Centauri, we culd suggest that either that was a fairly common form of government or it represented the pre-existing faction that was either the largest or best held together during the occupation.
Its quite possible that a sizeable faction or nation(s) of Narn were peaceful agrarian people but that there were nations or groups of Narn more warlike and had things like ancestral swords and assassin guilds.
Personally, if there were separate nations and at least some were warlike, it would make sense to me that all had some sort of military. Had they not, the warlike ones would probably have conquered them. Perhaps no more warlike than modern Japan or Sweden in some cases, but still able to defend themselves.
And as it was said, it could be "revisionist" history on the part of G'Kar. After all, its nothing new to have someone to focus on some aspects of history to make a point while downplaying or ignoring aspects that would conflict with their view.
That would be my first choice. He was on B5 to drum up support for his people against the Centauri and, with his history of deceit, it makes sense that he would say whatever he thought would gain him support. It does seem that people forget that in season 1 G'Kar was a lying, manipulative, blood-thirsty b@@tard.
Then it could also be that Narn had a violent past but had largely moved past their bloody ways, but that elements of their violent past still remained - elements that may have been ceremonial and traditional until the occupation, when they became important again.
Also possible. However, this approach seems somewhat cliched in SF, the old "finally acheived peace which left them open to invasion" tack is kind of tired. Of course, that's all up to Mr. Hahn!

Matt

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 30 guests